Nov. 3—a day most of us have long been looking forward to, with a mixture of anticipation and dread—is just hours away.

I have been an anxious mess, I will admit, all day—in large part because no matter what happens, a whole lot of people are going to be angry.

As for tomorrow: The Independent won’t be covering the results as they come in, as we don’t have the proper staffing to do that well—and we don’t do things we can’t do well. We’ll have PLENTY of coverage post-election on what everything means, but for Election Day and the immediate aftermath, here are the sources I recommend.

For local results: Follow the county’s election page here. This is where you can see the city and other local results as they come in.

For state results: I recommend following the fantastic coverage of our partners at CalMatters. You can also view the live results as they come in at the secretary of state’s page. Finally, the Los Angeles Times is the closest thing the state has to a newspaper of record, so it’s worth a watch.

For national results: Well, take your pick of all the big media sources. I recommend a big-newspaper website like The New York Times or The Washington Post, or one of the original four (ABC, NBC, CBS, PBS) networks’ news sites over any of the cable-news sites. Also, if you want an interesting foreign perspective, BBC News is worth a look.

Take a deep breath. Stay calm. And hang in there.

News from the day, much of it related, as you’d expect:

• The Associated Press has published a lengthy explainer on how the organization “calls” each race. Find that here.

• Remember that on the national level, there is not just one election; there are actually 50 separate elections taking place, all of which are done a little differently—and that’s REALLY important to remember this year. In some states, all of the early/received mail-in votes will be counted and released first (and those, according to polling, may tend to favor Biden); in other states, it’s the exact opposite. The New York Times has published a fantastic chart explaining when we can expect each state to report what results here.

Nate Silver, of FiveThirtyEight, says Trump has about a 10 percent chance of winning—and 10 percent is NOT nothing. His piece, “I’m Here To Remind You That Trump Can Still Win,” is worth a read, to better understand the vagaries of polling and whatnot.

• Sigh. The president today signed an executive order creating a “1776 Commission.” According to Politico, the goal of the commission is “to promote ‘patriotic education’ and counter lessons that he says divide Americans on race and slavery and teach students to ‘hate their own country.’” This is some scary stuff.

• Meanwhile, the White House is being surrounded by “non-scalable” fencing in anticipation of protests.

• Aaand in some states, last-minute attack ads with a decidedly anti-LGBTQ slant are popping up. According to NBC News, an example: “Omar Leos, a candidate for the San Antonio School Board, has been happily married to his husband since 2013, but he did not expect his relationship to be an issue in the campaign. However, Texas Family Action, a political action committee affiliated with the conservative San Antonio Family Association, sent a mailer to voters in Leos’ district describing him as being ‘“married” to same-sex man’ and noting he has ‘no children’ in the school district.” 

• Now for some good news: A federal judge—known for a conservative bent—rejected an attempt by Republicans to get 127,000 votes thrown out in Texasbecause they were cast via drive-through voting. Thank goodness.

• The big local news of the day: The 2021 Palm Springs International Film Festival has been cancelled. While not surprising at all, it is very sad. A quote from the news release: “As we reach the end of the year, it is clear that we will not be able to present the film festival the way we have over the past 31 years. This is not an easy choice but we have made the decision to skip the 2021 edition. Rest assured we plan to be back in 2022 when we can hopefully be together safely again in theaters. We are still planning to celebrate and honor the best in cinema with our Film Awards Presentation on February 25, 2021 and plans for our annual short film festival scheduled for June 22-28, 2021 remain intact.”

• Back to national news: Over the weekend, Dr. Anthony Fauci told The Washington Post that the status of the pandemic in the United States is dire: He said: “We’re in for a whole lot of hurt. It’s not a good situation. All the stars are aligned in the wrong place as you go into the fall and winter season, with people congregating at home indoors. You could not possibly be positioned more poorly.”

• You can probably guess what happened next, but anyway: This assessment really ticked off the president and his supporters—so much so that Trump told a crowd that he might fire Fauci after the election.

• Sort of related: Dr. Scott Atlas, the man who apparently has Trump’s ear over Fauci these days regarding the coronavirus, doesn’t know what RT is. According to The New York Times: “Dr. Scott W. Atlas, the White House coronavirus adviser, apologized on Sunday for appearing on a Russian state-sponsored news show that has been instrumental in an effort by the Russian government to spread false health information during the pandemic. Dr. Atlas did not, however, apologize for the content of the interview, where he continued a pattern as Mr. Trump’s adviser of downplaying the severity of the coronavirus pandemic, as well as asserting without evidence that lockdown measures used to contain the virus are ‘killing people.’

• Our partners at CalMatters created a map/chart showing where donations to the two main presidential candidates came from in California, broken down by zip code. By that measure, some parts of the Coachella Valley prefer Biden; others prefer Trump.

The conclusions of a recent Stanford study: “We investigate the effects of large group meetings on the spread of COVID-19 by studying the impact of 18 Trump campaign rallies. … We conclude that these 18 rallies ultimately resulted in more than 30,000 incremental confirmed cases of COVID-19. Applying county-specific post-event death rates, we conclude that the rallies likely led to more than 700 deaths (not necessarily among attendees).”

• Related, I fear, is this headline from Slate: “Trump Plans to Hold an Election Night Party Inside White House With 400 Guests.”

• OK, and now a little more good news: A small study out of the U.K. shows that people who had mild or asymptomatic COVID-19 cases still had cellular immunity six months later, “suggesting they might have some level of protection for at least that time.”

• Also good: A judge has told the U.S. Postal Service to get its crap together: “The U.S. Postal Service (USPS) must remind senior managers they must follow its ‘extraordinary measures’ policy and use its Express Mail Network to expedite ballots ahead of Tuesday’s presidential election, under an order signed by a U.S. judge.”

• Finally, there’s a word in Mexico, “zozobra,” that defines a concept that heretofore was unfamiliar to many Americans: “The word ‘zozobra’ is an ordinary Spanish term for ‘anxiety’ but with connotations that call to mind the wobbling of a ship about to capsize. The term emerged as a key concept among Mexican intellectuals in the early 20th century to describe the sense of having no stable ground and feeling out of place in the world.” Read more, from The Conversation, on how to handle zozobra—something many of us are experiencing right now.

Well, here we go. Stay safe, and go vote if you have not done so already. The Daily Digest will be back on Wednesday, the good Lord willing.

Jimmy Boegle

Jimmy Boegle is the founding editor and publisher of the Coachella Valley Independent. A native of Reno, Nevada, the Dodgers fan went to Stanford University intending to become a sportswriter—but fell...