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Last updateTue, 18 Sep 2018 1pm

The recently concluded BNP Paribas Open in Indian Wells has grown into one of the biggest events here in the valley; people flock from all over the planet to watch the greatest tennis players in the world ply their trade.

Along with the players and fans, members of the media also come from various places around the world—and one tournament volunteer has the job of making sure they all get what they need.

Judy Strobl of Oceanside is in charge of the press room of the BNP Paribas Open. She has been a volunteer for the tournament for 13 years. It’s no secret that any large event here in the valley is dependent on volunteers—and the BNP Paribas Open is no exception.

“We have over 1,500 volunteers who handle everything from the media, to ushering duties,” Strobl said. “It’s impossible to understate the impact these volunteers have. Without them, there is no tournament.”

Strobl is very diplomatic when asked what it’s like to deal with members of the media. When asked if they can be difficult, she replied: “They want what they want, when they want. I try to take into consideration that many of them are jet-lagged and are used to working on deadlines. We work very hard with the PR staff to try to be as accommodating as possible.”

Of course, there’s always a chance that problems will come up—such as what happened last year when a French TV crew arrived.

“They airline had misplaced their luggage,” Strobl said. “They literally only had the clothes on their backs. We set up appointments with local thrift stores so they could be properly attired. It was a mad scramble, but eventually, they were able get clothes and get it done. I don’t know how, but we got it done.”

As the tournament grows, so, too, does the workload in the media room. “We have already over 400 media members here,” Strobl said. “It will require more and more finesse, but we are ready.”

As part of the multi-million-dollar improvements made to Stadium 1, the press room just received major improvements. Everything is now state of the art, with TV screens and digital hookups throughout the press area.

“Even though the modes and methods of communication and media are changing, the media always needs to see a friendly face—and that one hopefully will continue to be mine,” Strobl said.

Steve Kelly can be reached at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Follow him on Twitter @skellynj.

Published in Sports

An estimated 450,000 people attend March’s BNP Paribas Open tennis tournament … so what do the other 434,000 people do when the tournament has narrowed down to action in just Stadium 1?

One possible answer: They head over to the Renaissance Indian Wells Resort and Spa for the second annual Spectrum Indian Wells Art Show, taking place Thursday, March 16, through Sunday, March 19.

Lisa Ashinoff is just one of the many artists participating in the juried contemporary arts show. The Virginia Beach, Va., resident studied art at Bard College and Florida International University. Why is she taking part in an art show so far away from home?

“My body of work is a good fit out there,” she said.

Actually, her work—paintings and drawings of cityscapes and dreamscapes—has been shown in Palm Springs before, which should come as no surprise, since she describes her work as “a mixture of modern and a midcentury modern.” She said growing up in a Norman Jaffe-designed house influenced her work, which has hints of Frank Lloyd Wright’s architecture as well. Ashinoff’s precise lines come from a system she has honed over the years.

She recently displayed her work at one of Spectrum Indian Wells’ sister shows in Miami, and she said she’s looking forward to having her work back in the desert.

“It allows me to show my work to get more exposure, because I have pretty large paintings,” she said. “The gallery hasn’t been able to show as many big pieces as I like, so it allows me to take (to the show) the big pieces I like.”

Ashinoff’s paintings can indeed be big—as large as 73 inches by 92 inches.

“They’re bold when they’re larger,” she said. “The color and the style of them are more effective on a larger scale. They just lend themselves to being a little larger than normal. I think it’s easier to paint a larger painting than it is to paint a smaller painting.”

The international list of galleries and artists confirmed as participants in Spectrum Indian Wells is quite impressive. For example, Renssen Art Gallery, from the Netherlands, will show works in the figurative tradition. Renssen is an avid admirer of Pablo Picasso, and adds a bit of abstraction—with vibrant and subdued colors—to his works.

Also confirmed is Canadian James Patterson, a sculptor whose work includes a piece that was commissioned by and recently installed at the Peter Gilgan Centre for Research and Learning/Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto.

Almost any type of artwork one can imagine—painting, photography, glassworks, sculptures and more—will be on display at the show. Spectrum Indian Wells is one of six annual art shows put on by the Redwood Media Group, including Artexpo New York, which is billed as the largest fine-art trade show.

Spectrum Indian Wells takes place at the Renaissance Indian Wells Resort and Spa, 44400 Indian Wells Lane, in Indian Wells. The opening-night preview, from 5 to 8 p.m., Thursday, March 16, is a benefit for the Desert AIDS Project; tickets are $50 in advance, or $60 at the door. One-day passes for the rest of the show are $20 in advance, or $30 at the event; three-day passes are $25 online, or $35 at the event, with discounts for students and seniors. Children 15 and younger are admitted for free. For tickets or more information, visit spectrum-indianwells.com. Below: "El Raval" by Lisa Ashinoff.

Published in Visual Arts

It is the biggest local sports event of the year, bringing thousands of visitors and millions of dollars to the Coachella Valley—and the BNP Paribas Open will return to the Indian Wells Tennis Garden March 6-19.

The event is a Masters 1000 event—meaning it’s one of the nine most prestigious tourneys after the four Grand Slam events and the ATP World Tour Finals—on the men’s ATP Tour, and one of the esteemed premier tournaments on the women’s circuit. Those designations ensure that the top players in the world come—including Serena Williams, who returned in 2015 for the first time since a controversial exit in 2001. Total attendance could hit the 500,000 mark this year; only the four Grand Slam events have more visitors.

Last year, the event was again marred by controversy when then-tournament director Raymond Moore made what some considered to be disparaging remarks about female players during a press conference. Moore was forced to resign as tournament director, and in an unusual move, the tournament’s owner, billionaire tech guru Larry Ellison, last June selected Tommy Haas—an active German pro player who now lives in Los Angeles—as the new tournament director. Haas is currently getting ready to play in the Australian Open (taking place Jan. 16-29). This creates the intriguing and highly unusual possibility that Haas could play in a tournament that he’s directing come March.

“Tommy is definitely excited (about) joining the team, and it has been a nice transition to the other side of the game for him,” said Steve Birdwell, the chief operating officer of the BNP Paribas Open. “Tommy is focused on learning as much as he can. He will concentrate on strengthening existing relationships to create more meaningful interactions between players, sponsors and fans.”

There have been major renovations to the main stadium at the Tennis Garden, which first opened in 2000.

“We have upgraded concessions as well as all our luxury suites,” Birdwell said. “There are new restrooms as well. The walkways and concourse have been enclosed, freeing up over 100,000 square feet of space.”

Birdwell said that despite the worldwide appeal of the BNP Paribas Open, locals are important to the tourney organizers; in fact, locals receive discounts (along with seniors, students and military personnel), and Birdwell pointed out that admission is free on March 6 and 7, the first two days of the tournament.

While American men’s tennis has been in decline for a while, the BNP Paribas Open continues to grow—in part because it has become more of a festival-type event, with many ways to entertain tournament-goers both inside and outside of the main stadiums. Plans for a tennis museum are also in the works.

For more information on the BNP Paribas Open, visit www.bnpparibasopen.com.

Steve Kelly can be reached at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Follow him on Twitter @skellynj.

Published in Sports