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Sun08252019

Last updateTue, 18 Sep 2018 1pm

With the release of the Golden Globe nominations comes the yearly opportunity to talk about the stupid, shitty snubs that make the Globes a joke.

High atop this year’s WTF? list would be the snubbing of one Jake Gyllenhaal for some of his career-best work in Stronger, the story Jeff Bauman. Bauman lost his legs to the asshats who set off bombs at the Boston Marathon—and he managed to get a glimpse of one of the attackers before the explosion.

At the time of the marathon, Bauman was sort-of on hiatus from on-again, off-again girlfriend Erin Hurley (Tatiana Maslany). In an effort to win her back, he promised to show up at the finish line to cheer her on as she completed her great personal journey. What should’ve been a triumphant moment wound up being a terrible tragedy.

Directed by David Gordon Green, the film is a story of strength and love, endurance and determination—and being just plain pissed off about being permanently injured. Gyllenhaal’s warts-and-all depiction of Bauman resonates in a way that feels real. It’s the kind of performance that deserved recognition.

Let’s see what Oscar has to say about this.

Stronger is available via online sources including iTunes and Amazon.com.

Published in DVDs/Home Viewing

On this week's size-does-matter Independent comics page: The City, in a normal strip and a bonus strip, examines pressure-cooker background checks and Rush Limbaugh's thoughts on the Boston tragedy; Red Meat gets out the butter to keep the monsters away; Roland and Cid stock up on pot roasts before it's too late; and Jen Sorenson ponders buying an elected official.

Published in Comics

The Dropkick Murphys’ set during Weekend 1 of Coachella seemed … off. The performance by the Boston-area band seemed cut in half, and the band only played a string of songs off their two most-recent albums.

Of course, a lot has happened in the week since that performance.

Dropkick Murphys have always had a soft spot for their hometown and have never held back in expressing their love for their city.

The Weekend 2 appearance of Dropkick Murphys, of course, came a day after the capture of Dzhokhar Tsarnaev. As the world now knows, he and his older brother, Tamerlan Tsarnaev, allegedly planted two bombs that exploded at the Boston Marathon, and killed one police officer.

The Dropkick Murphys’ style of including Celtic music in their punk-rock sound has always made them a popular live act around the world. The band has always included their hometown of Boston as a theme in their music, and even recorded the song “Tessie” for the Boston Red Sox. They also play a series of shows throughout various venues in the city on St. Patrick’s Day every year.

As one of the darkest weeks in Boston’s history unfolded, the band again did their hometown proud, raising more than $60,000 this week with a collector’s edition T-shirt they sold via their website for victims of the bombing.

The band’s intro music—The Chieftains’ “The Foggy Dew,” featuring Sinead O’Connor on vocals—played before the band took the stage earlier today. The band’s road crew struggled to secure a flag featuring the seal of the city of Boston, and they eventually took down due to technical problems. The band opened up the set with “For Boston,” the first song off their 2001 album Sing Loud, Sing Proud. The large crowd that gathered at the main stage screamed the lyrics back to the band.

“We’d like to thank everyone for their support for our hometown of Boston,” said Ken Casey, bassist and vocalist of Dropkick Murphys. Casey and lead vocalist Al Barr traded the lead vocals on several songs.

The crowd was energetic, even in the hot sun, breaking out into mosh pits and crowd-surfing. (See the photo gallery below) The band asked people to “put their arms around their neighbor and do an Irish jig,” the crowd obeyed, despite the blistering heat.

Al Barr ran down to the crowd level and stood on the security fence to sing during many of the band’s songs.

Dropkick Murphys played several of their fast-paced Celtic/punk rock songs, but they also played some of their sentimental ballads, including the song “Rose Tattoo” from their new album, Signed and Sealed in Blood. Dropkick Murphys were joined by The Pogues’ accordion player James Fearnley last week; this week, the crowd was treated to Gordon Gano from Violent Femmes, who followed Dropkick Murphys on the main stage. Gano played the fiddle on “Captain Kelly’s Kitchen.”

The band closed their memorable set at Coachella Weekend 2 with “I’m Shipping Up to Boston” after stating that they were happy to be headed home to be with their families.

Have a safe journey home, boys. You did your city proud at Coachella.

Published in Reviews