CVIndependent

Thu08222019

Last updateTue, 18 Sep 2018 1pm

When entering the painstakingly manicured 121-acre grounds of the Indian Wells Tennis Garden for Day 1 of the 2019 BNP Paribas Open, I couldn’t help but be impressed by the beauty offered up by both the Coachella Valley itself and the iconic sporting event that makes its home here.

The BNP Paribas Open was voted the Tournament of the Year in 2018 by both ATP men and WTA women for the fifth consecutive year, and one is immediately enveloped by the gorgeous vistas and the excitement spurred when all the best tennis players in the world converge here—but beyond the beautiful surroundings, this event is also defined by the many residents of our valley who fill all types of roles crucial to the success of this two-week tennis bacchanal.

From ball persons to security personnel, to groundskeepers and ushers, you’ll find CV residents present to welcome throngs of fans—totaling more than 450,000 last year. (To see photos of just a few of our involved neighbors, scroll down below.)

The on-court competition ramps up gradually from Days 1 and 2, when the qualifying matches for the main draw play out across the 29 courts. For the first time this year, the night of Day 2 featured the Eisenhower Cup event, a curious hybrid exhibition/competition featuring eight of the world’s best-known ATP players engaged in a form of high-speed tennis known as Tie-Break-Ten. Hosted in its inaugural appearance by perennial fan favorite Rafael Nadal, the world’s No. 2-ranked player, the players face off in four quarterfinal matches, followed by two semi-finals and then the championship, which was won by Milos Raonic.

While the uncharacteristically cold and wet winter weather showed up again as play was about to begin, it could not dampen the fun or attraction of the risk-taking tennis that entertained the crowd late into the night. All proceeds from ticket sales are to be donated to local charities—making this kickoff event a true celebration of the best the world of sports can deliver.

See images from the opening days of the BNP Paribas Open below.

Published in Snapshot

The competition will get serious on Wednesday, March 7, as the last-minute qualifiers to the 2018 BNP Paribas Open join the seeded players in both the men’s and women’s draws—with the goal of becoming the tourney champ, when play concludes Sunday, March 18.

Over the next two weeks, fans will flock to the beautiful Indian Wells Tennis Garden for match play. This year, the tourney’s “Full Bloom” marketing campaign is calling attention to “the world-class tennis players (who) participate in this event woven into the natural beauty of the desert landscape.”

The BNP Paribas Open has been voted the Tournament of the Year by both the women’s and men’s tours for the fourth consecutive year—and organizers are not resting on their laurels. Among the vibrant flowers and majestic palms added to the already impressive grounds, fans will be able to enjoy more concession options, including temporary desert outlets of famed eateries like Spago and high-end sushi franchise Nobu—as well as a newly added local roadshow from desert favorite Wally’s Desert Turtle, among other options.

Then there’s the amazing tennis, witnessed in an environment that brings fans closer to the players than most tournaments will allow. The field of top WTA female pros includes top 2018 performers Simona Halep, Caroline Wozniacki and Angelique Kerber, as well as perennial favorite Serena Williams, who is returning to the tournament after taking last year off due to the birth of her first child.

On the ATP side of the draw, top pros including former tourney champions Roger Federer, Novak Djokovic and Marin Cilic will join upstarts like Denis Shapovalov, Dominic Thiem and Mischa Zverev to battle through the desert’s warm days and long nights.

Here’s a brief gallery of snapshots from the first, free-admission days of this year’s event, which included the annual Kids’ Day event, player practice sessions and qualifying-round matches, which took place last weekend.

Published in Snapshot

It is the biggest local sports event of the year, bringing thousands of visitors and millions of dollars to the Coachella Valley—and the BNP Paribas Open will return to the Indian Wells Tennis Garden March 6-19.

The event is a Masters 1000 event—meaning it’s one of the nine most prestigious tourneys after the four Grand Slam events and the ATP World Tour Finals—on the men’s ATP Tour, and one of the esteemed premier tournaments on the women’s circuit. Those designations ensure that the top players in the world come—including Serena Williams, who returned in 2015 for the first time since a controversial exit in 2001. Total attendance could hit the 500,000 mark this year; only the four Grand Slam events have more visitors.

Last year, the event was again marred by controversy when then-tournament director Raymond Moore made what some considered to be disparaging remarks about female players during a press conference. Moore was forced to resign as tournament director, and in an unusual move, the tournament’s owner, billionaire tech guru Larry Ellison, last June selected Tommy Haas—an active German pro player who now lives in Los Angeles—as the new tournament director. Haas is currently getting ready to play in the Australian Open (taking place Jan. 16-29). This creates the intriguing and highly unusual possibility that Haas could play in a tournament that he’s directing come March.

“Tommy is definitely excited (about) joining the team, and it has been a nice transition to the other side of the game for him,” said Steve Birdwell, the chief operating officer of the BNP Paribas Open. “Tommy is focused on learning as much as he can. He will concentrate on strengthening existing relationships to create more meaningful interactions between players, sponsors and fans.”

There have been major renovations to the main stadium at the Tennis Garden, which first opened in 2000.

“We have upgraded concessions as well as all our luxury suites,” Birdwell said. “There are new restrooms as well. The walkways and concourse have been enclosed, freeing up over 100,000 square feet of space.”

Birdwell said that despite the worldwide appeal of the BNP Paribas Open, locals are important to the tourney organizers; in fact, locals receive discounts (along with seniors, students and military personnel), and Birdwell pointed out that admission is free on March 6 and 7, the first two days of the tournament.

While American men’s tennis has been in decline for a while, the BNP Paribas Open continues to grow—in part because it has become more of a festival-type event, with many ways to entertain tournament-goers both inside and outside of the main stadiums. Plans for a tennis museum are also in the works.

For more information on the BNP Paribas Open, visit www.bnpparibasopen.com.

Steve Kelly can be reached at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. Follow him on Twitter @skellynj.

Published in Sports