CVIndependent

Fri09222017

Last updateFri, 16 Sep 2016 12pm

It was a simple, four-step exercise:

1. We came up with a list of 10 questions—five serious, issue-based questions, and five questions that are a little more light-hearted—to ask all of the candidates for city office.

2. We set up interviews with all of the candidates.

3. We asked the candidates the 10 questions.

That’s exactly what Palm Springs resident Jimmy Boegle did over the last couple of weeks. He interviewed every one of the 14 Palm Springs candidates—eight mayoral candidates, and six City Council candidates.

Now, comes the last step.

4. Report the answers to those 10 questions.

Here’s what all of the candidates have to say. We only made minor edits on the candidates’ answers for grammar and style; in some cases, we also edited out redundancies. Finally, in some instances, we did not include portions of candidates’ answers if they went completely off-topic.

Welcome to Candidate Q&A.

Candidate Q&A: Palm Springs Mayoral Candidate Guy T. Burrows

Candidate Q&A: Palm Springs Mayoral Candidate Robert “Rob” Moon

Candidate Q&A: Palm Springs Mayoral Candidate Ricky B. Wright

Candidate Q&A: Palm Springs Mayoral Candidate Bob Weinstein

Candidate Q&A: Palm Springs Mayoral Candidate Ginny Foat

Candidate Q&A: Palm Springs Mayoral Candidate Bill Gunasti

Candidate Q&A: Palm Springs Mayoral Candidate Mike Schaefer

Candidate Q&A: Palm Springs Mayoral Candidate Ron Oden

Candidate Q&A: Palm Springs City Council Candidate Anna Nevenic

Candidate Q&A: Palm Springs City Council Candidate Paul Lewin

Candidate Q&A: Palm Springs City Council Candidate David Brown

Candidate Q&A: Palm Springs City Council Candidate J.R. Roberts

Candidate Q&A: Palm Springs City Council Candidate Jim King

Candidate Q&A: Palm Springs City Council Candidate Geoff Kors

Published in Politics

Name: Ricky Wright

Age: 66

Occupation: Former principal at Palm Springs High School

Interview: Phone

1. When you stand at the intersection of Tahquitz Canyon Road and Palm Canyon Drive, and look northwest, what comes to mind?

What comes to my mind is that the development is a lot different than what we have around it. That’s what I see. I mean, frankly, it doesn’t seem to fit, but that’s what was approved, I guess. It’s not what I perceived it to be when they were talking about it, and I never saw the plans or anything, but I thought it would fit a little better.

2. Does Palm Springs have a crime problem? If so, what should be done about it?

Yeah. I don’t think it’s as bad as it’s made out to be by some folks, but I do think it’s increased, and we need more officers. I think we’re down nine officers, and maybe more than that. So because of the cutbacks and the recession and all that, we need to add probably 12 new officers. I actually had a conversation with the chief about this, and he wants to balance that with experienced officers as well as new officers. You don’t want to hire 13 brand-new officers. He wants to have a balance, and I agree with that. The other issue is, if you’re going to attract experienced officers and have them leave the areas in which they live, there’s going to have to be some kind of bump in the pay for those officers. I think, as a city, we need to look at doing that.

3. What, if anything, should be done about alleged corruption in Palm Springs city government? Be specific.

At this point, it’s alleged. What’s going to happen as a result of it, is there’s going to be complete transparency for the new folks coming in and from this point on. It’s too bad it had to happen the way it happened. But the more transparent you are, the less likely we are to have those kinds of issues. That’s my feeling. Whatever happens, we’re going to work it out as a community. But, honestly, I’m embarrassed by it. My roots grow deep in the community. I’m embarrassed that … all around the state and country, they’re looking at this happening to us. It’s kind of embarrassing for us, although I think we’re going to get through it. It’s going to make us closer. I know in my career as an educator, it always came out to be when we had incidents like this, as a school community, we got stronger. As a community, I think we’re going to get stronger as a result of this.

4. What specific steps will you take to help solve the city’s homelessness issue?

I’ve said this repeatedly: The homelessness issue is not just a concern here in Palm Springs. Every major city has this issue, and I’m really glad they established the committee to look into it, but I think what we ought to do is canvas the country and the state and find out which programs are being successful, and then bring that back to Palm Springs and adjust it to meet our needs. The other issue is, we need a treatment center on this end of the valley to deal with those folks who are homeless who have addictions, who maybe have mental illness, and that would give the city more leverage—in particular the police department. Right now, we don’t have a lot of leverage to deal with people who are loitering and creating those situations that are causing problems for us.

5. Do you support electing City Council members by district, or do prefer the current at-large system? Why?

I prefer the system we have. I don’t know enough about the options of having wards. I don’t know enough about that. I don’t think that the system we have right now is a failure at all. In my experience of being here almost 20 years, it’s worked fine. So unless I can see some reason why we need to change, I’d like to keep it the way it is.

6. If you were not running for this office, which of your opponents would get your vote? Why?

I haven’t thought about it much. I don’t know. I mean, I don’t know the other candidates. The only other candidate I really know is Ron Oden. Would that mean I’d vote for Ron Oden? I don’t know. I’m getting to know the candidates better.

7. A dear friend is in town for just one night, and asks you where to go for dinner. Where are you sending this dear friend?

I like Melvin’s. There are several places my wife and I like to go. Depending on what kind of situation it is, I like to go and listen to music. I like Lulu.

8. Name one business or service that you wish Palm Springs had (but currently does not have).

I would lean toward having more tech businesses in the valley. Being a former educator and realizing the importance an advancement of technology, I’d like to have a big tech company here in the Coachella Valley where we can train our kids and be a part of the international technology movement. At the same time … we need a university here, a college in the Coachella Valley. … It’s best to have our own UC in the Coachella Valley.

9. Which annual Coachella Valley event or festival is your favorite? Why?

I like Coachella Valley festival—all of them. I like the ones that we have by Goldenvoice, and I think that does a lot for this city. The entertainment they bring in is fantastic. Now I do like the things that the younger folks are doing, like the Tachevah block party and Splash House. I really like those, and those are the products of some of my former students, so that makes it even nicer.

10. If the FBI was about to raid your home or office, which personal item would you grab to make sure it didn't get broken?

The keepsakes that are pictures of my mom and my grandparents … are real dear to me. I have a little mantel in my den that has their pictures on it, and I’d make sure that they didn’t bother those and break those. I have a vase that my grandmother gave me when I was younger, and I’d want to make sure that didn’t get broken. The mementos that are related to my family, in particular my grandparents and my mother and father, I’d make sure that those aren’t damaged.

Published in Politics