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Mon12092019

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29 Sep 2019

Candidate Q&A: Palm Springs City Council District 2 Candidates Dennis Woods, Peter Maietta and Adrian Alcantar

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Palm Springs City Council District 2 candidates Dennis Woods, Peter Maietta and Adrian Alcantar. Palm Springs City Council District 2 candidates Dennis Woods, Peter Maietta and Adrian Alcantar.

On Tuesday, Nov. 5, Palm Springs residents living in the newly drawn Districts 1, 2 and 3 will head to the polls to elect three City Council members.

These elections are the first step in the city’s transition from at-large to district-based representation, to comply with the California Voting Rights Act. The changeover will be complete after the November 2020 election of council members in Districts 4 and 5.

(To see the newly drawn districts, visit www.palmspringsca.gov/government/city-clerk/election-general-municipal-election.)

Another change: The city will no longer have a directly elected mayor; instead, Palm Springs will join most other valley cities in designating a councilmember as mayor for a year on a rotating basis.

The Independent recently spoke to the three candidates running for the new District 2 seat: Dennis Woods, Peter Maietta and Adrian Alcantar.

Here are their complete answers, edited only slightly for style and clarity, presented in the order in which the candidates will appear on the ballot.


Dennis Woods, Land-Use and Transportation Planner/Palm Springs Planning Commission Chair, 59 years old

What do you believe is the single most important and immediate issue facing the city of Palm Springs?

There’s actually more than one priority facing the city at this point, but an immediate issue facing the city is that of homelessness, because I think it’s an humanitarian issue as well as (a challenge for) our brand as a city.

I think we have right around 200 homeless (persons) in Palm Springs. The programs that we have are working effectively, but we need to graduate people out of a shelter and into permanent housing. The city has been very effective in setting up a shelter to get the homeless out of the heat and into a safe place to sleep in the evenings. Then in the daytime, we, along with the Well in the Desert, have established cooling centers. Also, through the Well and others, there are a variety of places around town where (one) can get a meal. I think all of those are positive things. Another positive thing is that at the cooling center, there are people from Martha’s Village and Kitchen who provide wrap-around services and try to figure out why a person is homeless—whether they have hit hard economic times, or if they have psychological issues or have addiction issues. I think those services are important to provide so that if we get someone into housing, they can maintain that housing (solution) by helping to get them rent subsidies, or get them work. Those programs are working, but we need to give them a boost.

What’s really fantastic to hear is that there’s a $10 million grant in the pipeline from the state to Palm Springs to deal with (this issue). We don’t know what strings may be attached to that money if the governor approves it, but I would like to see us graduate people from shelters to homes. I would love to see us set up kind of a “one-stop shop” where you can get all your services in one place: You can get a shower; you can talk to social-services people; you can get some counseling if you need it for an addiction problem. We can have a shelter, and we can offer some temporary housing as we look to get people into permanent housing. I think with the $10 million grant, we probably would have the capability to do something like that.

I completely support the work of the current City Council, and they have set up a subcommittee that is trying to get all the social-service agencies to coordinate and collaborate. When they come together in a room, and they share thoughts and resources, I think that is an absolute positive, and I would continue to support that type of collaboration.

You mentioned in your first answer that there were a number of pressing issues facing the city of Palm Springs. Since homelessness was the topic of our second planned question, would you like to talk about your next-most-important issue?

The next important issue is affordable housing. We have a very nice stock of market-rate housing being built, and we have an existing stock as well. For many, the price point of these homes is cost-prohibitive if they have a moderate to low income. I think what we really need to do is to focus on trying to provide a mix of housing for people of all economic backgrounds to live in. I don’t think that we’ve had an apartment complex (plan) come through the city during the almost two years that I’ve been on the Planning Commission. There’s a need for apartment complexes in this city.

There are two low-income housing projects in the pipeline now that are actually both (located) in my district, which is interesting. As part of a settlement agreement, (the city) got a parcel behind Home Depot, off of Gene Autry, that might provide great potential, when combined with the $10 million from the state, to do some housing as well as the (homeless services and shelter) center that I talked about earlier. So, I think my second issue would be to provide more affordable housing to the people of Palm Springs. It’s really going to take a multi-pronged, multifaceted approach and a huge amount of collaboration to build this type of housing. We have been successful (in some efforts to date). The Desert AIDS Project (DAP) has a great housing project right behind (their offices) on Vista Chino, and it is fantastic. It looks good; it’s managed well; and that’s the type of project that we need.

You said you found it “interesting” that the two current affordable-housing projects are in your district. Care to elaborate?

I think what’s important about that is that my district, should I be elected, is dealing with affordable housing. I think we need to look at other districts and other opportunities where city-owned properties might support affordable-housing projects. These projects—if designed right and managed well—are fantastic. This is not like the Cabrini-Green Homes project in Chicago, which is what many people think of (when discussing low-income housing). I gave you the example of (the project built) behind DAP; that type of project is desirable. It does not devalue a neighborhood. It can actually (increase the) value of a neighborhood by having workforce housing closer to jobs, thus reducing the carbon footprint and making a better community.

The cannabis industry has come to Palm Springs. How has the city handled it so far? What changes, if any, would you make regarding dispensaries, lounges and other cannabis businesses in the future?

The city as a whole has been proactive with cannabis, and it started back with medical marijuana. I think this just shows that we were sensitive to a population here that medical marijuana could actually help, whether it was those suffering from HIV, aging issues, glaucoma or anything else. We started courting cannabis facilities when it was only concerning medical uses. Now, the voters have moved it into a recreational use (category), and the city has seen a flood of cannabis (business) applications.

What’s important to understand is that, out of those cannabis applications, there are different types—for grow facilities, lounges, dispensaries and (businesses that make) products like candy. Each of those types has a different environmental impact. What we saw is that when we put (grow facilities) into our industrial areas, during the budding season, they gave off strong odors. Those odors caused neighbors to become upset, which is very understandable. The city at that point was not really prepared and did not have the mechanisms (needed to respond to the problem). At the Planning Commission meetings, I went on the record saying that we need to up our game with this, and we need to buy the equipment necessary to understand and measure odor (levels). We didn’t have the enforcement tools … but we now have those tools. Now we have to look at whether or not we have a problem with the saturation of cannabis (businesses). The Planning Commission just looked at four issues related to our cannabis ordinance. One is saturation; another is notification—how we notify adjoining businesses when a new cannabis business comes in; what a waiver means if businesses want to be closer together than what the saturation (levels) will allow; and … architectural review. We certainly don’t want our entire Palm Canyon (business district) to be all cannabis. We need a strong mix of businesses on Palm Canyon. Many lounges cannot have windows facing the street, so we don’t want a bunch of blacked-out windows, either.

I think it’s really important that we look at the architectural integrity of cannabis facilities as they come in. What I really want to say is that we want to ensure that there are no environmental impacts from our cannabis facilities. We don’t want to prohibit them; we just want to make sure that their operation has no environmental impact on existing entities.

What can or should be done to decrease crime in Palm Springs?

I do think that (crime) is being handled correctly in Palm Springs. I have been endorsed by both the police association and the firefighters.

We are in a very fortunate and luxurious position to have our own police department. Our response times are fast for stuff that matters. If something is minor, and they have (to deal with) a major traffic collision, then of course it’s going to be a little bit different. I believe that, at this point, we are fully staffed in our police department. We have the equipment that’s necessary, and we have agreements with the surrounding areas if we need to pull in additional resources.

Crime exists anywhere, and property crime is something that Palm Springs always has to deal with because of the number of vacant buildings. But I do not see crime, in and of itself, to be a major problem. We have had a couple of incidents at our nightclubs that involved guns, which is very unfortunate, but I think our police department has handled that very well. We need to understand that clubs are an important part of what Palm Springs is, because they enliven (our leisure environment) in the evenings. But it’s a lesson learned that these clubs need to make sure that they have their safety and security measures in place, which is the responsibility of the club owners. The police will work with them to get those measures in place, and I think what we saw previously was a failure of those security measures to be in place. In the case of Zelda’s, the City Council took swift action and revoked its permit when it didn’t put those safety practices in place. We’re serious about reducing and eradicating crime, and I think that’s a prime example of where we took swift action to pull a permit when crime happened.

What is your reaction to the proposed construction of a downtown 10,000 seat arena by the Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians?

The tribe has the right to build this arena, but like any other development project, they have to (provide to the city) a tribal environmental impact statement (EIS), which they are in the process of doing. That impact statement is somewhat modeled after the federal EIS, so the tribe will have to (share) what all the (potential) impacts are—and there will be impacts from this arena going in.

It is incumbent upon us as a city to make sure that we reduce and mitigate those impacts. We want to ensure that adjacent neighborhoods and businesses are protected in the process. There’s traffic, infrastructure, first-responder services, light and glare issues—and I could go on. All these issues have to be addressed in this EIS. We (Palm Springs) need to be cooperative with the tribe, but we also need to be very proactive with the tribe to ensure that we get solid, enforceable mitigation measures as we build this arena.

If it comes in, I believe that there could be some benefits to having an arena in town. I’m not exactly sure what those benefits are, but I think there could be some economic benefits. Still, we need to evaluate those based on solid information. So, I think that Palm Springs could benefit from it as long as we can reduce the impacts.

Is the city of Palm Springs ready for an economic recession?

We are. I think the city of Palm Springs is prepared for an economic recession. First, a large part of our economy runs off property taxes and transient occupancy taxes (TOT). If we have a recession, there would be a likelihood of a certain segment of the population no longer (traveling) to Europe or taking trips to the Caribbean. We are set up in such a way that we can market to the “drive market” like Los Angeles, San Diego, Santa Barbara and even San Francisco. So we can become the go-to place that is affordable when you can no longer afford a larger vacation. We need to do that to keep our TOT income coming in. Also, we have put aside reserves, which I think has been very intelligent on the part of the existing City Council.

During the last recession, we learned that we need to make sure that we don’t have vacant buildings that can reduce our property values. Riverside County as a whole was hit very hard, and Palm Springs suffered foreclosures. We just need to have the mechanisms in place, like the vacant building laws or whatnot, to ensure that at least the exterior of the properties are maintained so that we don’t degrade our existing property values. Also, we have (initiated) a lot of parties and events that draw a lot of people here and would continue to bring people here, like Splash House, Coachella and Stagecoach. So, I think we are prepared for a recession, particularly because we have our marketing machine that is nimble enough to change if the economy changes.

What’s your idea of the perfect night out in Palm Springs?

There are many perfect nights out in Palm Springs. (Laughs.) For me, a perfect evening would be to start off with beverages at the very nice midcentury home of a friend. You kind of all group there. From there, you go to one of our fine restaurants and do some nice “al fresco” dining. After the dining, as a gay man, I would head over to do a little dancing on Arenas, or some singing at one of the bars that does video-singing, and then call it an evening. I think that would be a perfect evening in Palm Springs.

Now, another perfect evening would be taking a beautiful night hike under the starry skies with some friends. A good place to do that would be going up Tramway Road, where it’s easy to see the roadway at night and not stumble. You can enjoy the lights of the city and the stars since you’re away from the light pollution.

Indian Canyon Drive will soon be a two-way thoroughfare. Yay or nay?

That’s a yay, and let me tell you why. First of all, I think it’s going to activate the businesses in that area and generate some new types of businesses as well. Secondly, with the build-out of the (Agua Caliente) Cultural Center, it will be a very nice connection to our downtown. It’s (just) across the street, but there are some barriers there, because the back of some buildings there are not activated. So, activating some of those buildings and allowing an easy crossing from the cultural center (will help). If the arena comes in, then it’s the same thing: We need some nice crossings to open the whole area up, so it doesn’t feel like you’re walking over a freeway to get to the other side of the road. I think (the traffic direction change) will eliminate that freeway aspect and make it feel more like the unique city that we are.

Also, we block Palm Canyon off quite a bit. Be it for the Tour de Palm Springs, VillageFest or the gay-pride festival, you have to (drive) through adjacent neighborhoods (to go south through town). With Indian Canyon being two-way, it should alleviate that kind of (traffic) stress through those neighborhoods. I think it’s a positive all the way around, and as a career transportation planner, I support it.

What question should we have asked you that we haven’t so far? And what’s your answer to that question?

I came here full-time about seven years ago, and I immediately reconstituted the Little Tuscany Neighborhood Organization to address a lot of quality-of-life ills around here. My neighbors saw how effective I was, and I quickly became the vice chair, and then was voted to become that group’s representative to ONE-PS, which is the umbrella organization. What’s been so reassuring is that my neighbors saw my effectiveness in getting things done, and they have completely encouraged me to run for City Council.

I think I’m in a very fortunate position, having the skill set and the lifelong experience working in municipal and regional government, to walk in and do a great job. The City Council sets policy, and I think I can do that very effectively. Secondly, I have the support of the vast majority of the (current) City Council, which really indicates that I can walk into that job with working relationships (already in place) with those sitting on the council. Why is that important? It’s important because that’s how you get things done. You really have to cooperate and work with one another to get things done. If I get the support of the citizens through being elected, it will be important that I have the support of the employees of City Hall and their unions. That means a lot. So, there’s a lot of confidence in me, and if elected, I really hope I can live up to the expectations.


Peter Maietta, Businessman, 51 years old

What do you believe is the single most important and immediate issue facing the city of Palm Springs?

That’s an easy one for me to answer: I believe it is affordable housing. One reason why I feel that way is because I live in a working-class district which I’ve been canvassing since April. What I hear primarily here in District 2 is that many people are struggling to make ends meet and just to stay in their homes. For them to look forward to continuing to live and work in Palm Springs is difficult. As you know, housing prices are higher here in Palm Springs, and they’re actually much higher than what working-class people can afford. Fundamentally, I think we need to get in front of this now, and to do what we need to build more affordable housing family units.

I know there will be one (affordable-housing development) going up in our district, and the Community Housing Opportunities Corporation is doing it. They’re in process of securing funding, but it’s fully approved. It’s actually quite in keeping with the architectural style of the area. It’s the nicest affordable development that I’ve ever come across. There’s a nice play area for children and a dog run. It’s great, and it’s actually geared toward one-bedroom and three-bedroom units, so for families or singles or couples. That will be the first (such development) that’s gone up here in 10 years, and I think that they should be spread throughout the city. We need to do our part to make sure (this option) is available to a lot of people, but in every district, not just concentrated in one.

Also, I’m definitely in favor of having all developers, building anywhere in the city, allot a certain percentage of new construction that they’re working on solely toward affordable-housing units. If a developer is unable or unwilling to do that, then I would like to see a cash (payment) received by the city that’s equal to the projected cost of building those affordable units in that particular development. That money can go into a general fund, so that more affordable housing can be developed throughout the entire city equally. Right now, Palm Springs is behind where it needs to be in addressing this issue, and it’s something I would advocate strongly for on the City Council.

What grade would you give the city of Palm Springs regarding its response to date to the homelessness problem? What has the city done well, and what future actions and policies would you support?

I would have to say that the city of Palm Springs is a shining example of what can be done for homelessness. In conjunction with the Coachella Valley Association of Governments and the Desert Healthcare District (DHCD), Palm Springs, along with most of the Coachella Valley, is moving toward a “housing first” model. “Housing first” is an approach (to alleviating homelessness) by quickly and successfully connecting individuals and families who are experiencing homelessness to permanent housing. There can be no preconditions or barriers, like being sober or requiring any other treatment or services, set for (anyone) as participation requirements. There’s no one cause for homelessness, and there’s no one cure for it, but by giving people shelter and access to whatever services they need, it can help end the cycle of homelessness for at least the one individual. And it will help integrate them back into society. So, you’re ending homelessness one person at a time. It’s far more likely that cycle can be broken for someone if they are already living somewhere, and they have services wrapped around them. If there is no “housing first” approach, and people are just treated for an addiction or (rescued from) domestic violence, and if they are not housed and helped, then they just wind up back out on the streets. So, I think the city has a really good plan in this instance.

The city is waiting to get $10 million from the state to go toward this problem. The DHCD has given $1 million, too. I believe that Palm Springs has put up a certain amount of money (for this issue) as well. So, there’s a good solid, strong plan.

I would like to see a new 24/7 shelter that’s open 365 days a year for acute homelessness needs. Right now, we have the Well in the Desert facility, Arlene Rosenthal’s facility, which is great. And the city is wonderful for extending her permit for a longer period of time so she can remain in that building. It’s been open 24 hours during this terrible heat of recent months, but I do think there’s a need for another shelter.

The cannabis industry has come to Palm Springs. How has the city handled it so far? What changes, if any, would you make regarding dispensaries, lounges and other cannabis businesses in the future?

I think the city has done a great job embracing this industry. I feel that the city continues to grow and refine its ordinances—specifically, I mean like odor ordinances, which seems to be a primary concern of many residents here. Because it is so windy, where there are grow or manufacture (cannabis facilities), then the smell can become a problem. But the city has done a great job of making sure that odors are contained, and they have very stringent policies in place with lots of measuring devices to make sure (the regulations are met).

I think they did a great job of lowering the level of taxation (on cannabis businesses in the city) to make dispensaries more competitive with other valley cities. Also, we face an underground market problem here with our cannabis industry, which makes it more difficult for legal dispensaries to compete, because in an illicit market, the prices can be lower.

I have no problem with retail shops or lounges, but I would like to see them equally distributed throughout commercial areas in the city. I think right now, the ordinance states that there has to be at least 1,000 feet between such businesses. I’m definitely in favor of creating a “green zone” designed to house manufacturing and cultivation sites away from residential areas. I think that would do a great deal to mitigate the odor concerns that some residents have—not all, but some.

I’d like to see the creation of a long-term cannabis commission or task force that would allow citizens to always have a voice in this industry as it grows. I mean, that’s nothing new for the city: They have lots of subcommittees, working groups and advisory/informative groups for people to give information, feedback and flavor to the decision makers.

What can or should be done to decrease crime in Palm Springs?

Well, crime is everywhere in our country. But I think our police department, and our police chief in particular, are doing a remarkable job here in Palm Springs to keep crime under control.

A few months ago, I had the pleasure of doing a ride-along with one of our officers, and I got to see firsthand how hard our force works to protect the city. I saw so many calls that day, and I have the utmost respect for the way they do their job and how they put their lives on the line each day for everyone in this city. I can’t stress enough just how much respect I have for them. I know that as of this January, the police department will (again) be fully staffed for a city of roughly 47,000 people. The recently added officer recruits are now all out on patrol. But I think that one way to decrease future crime would be to do an impact study on the influx of additional tourists we have (visiting the city) every year and consider adding additional officers, or part-time officers, to aid our dedicated police force during the high season. Although on paper, come January, we’ll be fully staffed for a city of our size, we’re never really just a city of our size, because we always have a significant number of visitors in our city.

Everyone knows that our economy may soften, and my fear is that if people were to lose their jobs due to a downturn in tourism, we may see crime rise in our city. That’s another reason that I’m a strong proponent for ensuring that our police force has the means and a plan to be adequately staffed, were that to happen.

What is your reaction to the proposed construction of a downtown 10,000 seat arena by the Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians?

I personally am very excited about it for a number of reasons. I definitely want to see Palm Springs thrive as a vacation destination, and I think a venue such as (the proposed arena) will help us greatly. And I’m even more excited over the new jobs that will be created for our residents. I’d like to see our residents chosen for those jobs first. I know that (decision) is really up to the (Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians), but personally I would love to see them pull from our pool of residents here.

I am concerned about the stress that a venue of that size will put on the city’s infrastructure, including our roads, our traffic and our law-enforcement resources. When elected, I want to foster a strong relationship with the tribe and help to work with both the City Council and the tribe to make sure that everyone’s concerns are dissipated and that the venue is a true success. Although the tribe is a sovereign nation, we all share the same city, and we all have a shared interest in its growth.

Is the city of Palm Springs ready for an economic recession?

I think the city has done a great job thus far of keeping and managing our reserves (which we’ll need) in the event of another economic downturn. But we are primarily an economy that is based upon tourism. In an economic downturn, we may see less revenue come to our city from out-of-town visitors. I think that given the many events we already have here in the Coachella Valley, coupled with the new 10,000-seat arena, tourism should never evaporate, so to speak. With that said, we should continue to find ways to set aside funds for future infrastructure needs.

In my District 2, and in other areas of the city, our roads are in very poor condition. The water mains, particularly where I live in Desert Park Estates, rupture somewhere on an almost weekly basis. Those water mains have reached their life expectancy. Our municipal buildings are showing signs of deferred maintenance. I am a strong advocate for updating the city’s general plan, which has not been updated in seven years, and it’s a 20-year plan. I think if we do update it, we’ll be able to prioritize the municipal projects in such a way that they’re addressed before they fail. If we can address such issues earlier, then we can be smarter about conserving resources.

What’s your idea of the perfect night out in Palm Springs?

You do know that I’m running for public office, and I haven’t had a carefree, fun night out in Palm Springs in months. (Laughs.) But I am looking forward to one. I’d start off by having dinner at one of the fabulous Mexican restaurants that we have here, because it’s my favorite kind of food. I’d have a margarita and then probably something deliciously unhealthy to eat. Then, to counteract that, I’d take a long walk, visit our local shops and just talk to people along the way. I find that the best way I can shape my platform is by talking to as many people as possible who not only live in my district, but in the city overall. Now that I’m beginning to be recognized, since my bus ads are all over town, people are very willing to talk, and I’m always very willing to hear what they have to say.

Indian Canyon Drive will soon be a two-way thoroughfare. Yay or nay?

I’d say that I’m for it. I think it will definitely help alleviate traffic on Palm Canyon Drive. It will certainly aid in traffic control when the new arena is built, because a 10,000-seat stadium could mean 10,000 cars. But mostly I think it will help drive foot traffic to the already existing—and I imagine new—businesses on Indian Canyon, which will help our economy. So, I would say “yay” to it.

What question should we have asked you that we haven’t so far? And what’s your answer to that question?

(I’d like) to tell (the readers) a little bit about myself. I was a banker for 20 years, and in my last job, I worked for Union Bank investment services. I ran marketing for all their brokerage products and their retirement bank-deposit products. After that, I bought into an architecture and interior-design firm which I ran for six years before moving full-time here to the desert. So, from being in corporate America and owning a small business, I do understand how to create jobs, and what the struggles are for working families in Palm Springs.

I feel that I’m ready to get down to business at City Hall on day one. I’m a community volunteer, and I’m on the board of directors of Desert Park Estates, which is my neighborhood association. I serve on the fundraising committee for the LGBTQ center, and I served as an appointed member of the Palm Springs Board of Appeals. I’m just a guy who loves my city and my district, and at this point in my life, I have the time and the inclination to give back, and I’d really like to do that.


Adrian Alcantar, Salon and Day Spa Owner, 37 years old

What do you believe is the single most important and immediate issue facing the city of Palm Springs?

In all honesty, it could be any one of a magnitude of issues, but I think we really need to focus on our (city’s) deficit. As a business owner, I’ve sat in on a City Council meeting where the city approved a two-year projected budget with a deficit of roughly $215,000. If I operated a business and approved a budget with a deficit, I wouldn’t be in business. That’s the bottom line. I look at pension liabilities, bonds that are out on the convention center, and the mounting infrastructure improvements that need to be made on city-owned property, and it concerns me. With the new arena that is going to be built—I believe that it is inevitable—we have an opportunity right now to change the dynamic of the way the city does business. I really believe that (the arena) could be a new revenue stream for the city of Palm Springs that could positively impact the reduction of debt.

Now, with the pension liability, I think we have about $192 million (accrued to date), and it’s continuously growing. Then you look at the additional lifetime medical benefits for city employees, and that’s another $100 million. And then there are the bonds that are out on the convention center and the airport. We just approved, I think, somewhere between $30-$50 million for a bond for the airport reconstruction of the baggage-claim area. And you look at police overtime, fire overtime, city staff pay—and it just continues to snowball.

What grade would you give the city of Palm Springs regarding its response to date to the homelessness problem? What has the city done well, and what future actions and policies would you support?

I would give the city of Palm Springs an “F.” I want to explain that this comes after the city of Palm Springs vacated a number of individuals from Sunrise Park. They removed these individuals and then moved a mobile command center into Sunrise Park to combat the mounting heroin and drug-related issues that were occurring. They have deemed this to be a public-safety and health issue. I commend them on their efforts, and I want to be very clear when I say that I value what they’re doing to take back the park and allow it to be a space that’s free for everyone. However—and this is where the grade comes into play—my big concern was that there were not any leaders of (nonprofit) communities, or leaders from the county, or leaders from other resources that are available to these (homeless) individuals, available at the time of vacating them. The night after (the city’s action), the Street Life Project went in to do a meal service, which they offer on a regular basis. It was published that there’s a temporary stop to that service, because the police department has placed a ban on feeding the homeless. Now, this is not humane.

I also sat in a City Council meeting, and I listened to Chief Bryan Reyes—and I’m going to quote him on this—say that “homelessness is not a crime.” He said that in public testimony at that council meeting. But what we have done is criminalize individuals who want to help combat the crisis. They want to help by providing food or other services, and I think it’s wrong (to criminalize their service). We haven’t developed a plan, and we are jumping through these strategic moves, but there is no public plan in place, and that’s what concerns me the most.

Look at cities like Boston, San Francisco and Seattle. All of them have plans that are in place. Boston is a great example. They have leaders of the (nonprofit) communities come together at the table, because these are stakeholders in the community. In 2015, they realized they had an issue, and by working together, they instituted a plan with the city itself. (Palm Springs City Manager) David Ready is on record saying that homelessness in the city is not our issue, that it’s a county issue. And that’s wrong. It is everybody’s issue. It is a humanitarian issue. I will stand behind that (statement) 100 percent. Now, we need to come together as a working community to combat the crisis that is in front of us that we deal with on a daily basis.

By vacating people from the park, it has spread them all over the city. We may not see them, because they’re not concentrated, but they’re still there. I think it was 256 individuals (tracked) on the count, but I’m sure there are more than that. And the question now is, “Where did they go?” I truly value the work that Arlene Rosenthal does over at the Well in the Desert. She’s having some issues with her conditional-use permit. I hope the city recognizes that she needs to be a valuable asset in that city plan. And with $10 million coming from the state, if that happens and that fund gets created by the governor, I hope we form a group. I don’t want to call it a task force, and I don’t want to call it a commission, because when you do that, you get lost in (all the rules like) public comments being limited to only two minutes, but I think we need an open forum to put all the (nonprofit) stakeholders in the area together to say, “Listen, this is how we need to be able to help with this issue.” Then we can go into a commission or task force that’s formed. But I really believe we need to bring together a group of people who know what the hell they are doing in regards to this topic. And we don’t need to just blow the money on some damned consultant. That’s all that you’re going to get from me on that one.

The cannabis industry has come to Palm Springs. How has the city handled it so far? What changes, if any, would you make regarding dispensaries, lounges and other cannabis businesses in the future?

Recently, I had the opportunity to go to a meeting of (the Coachella Valley Cannabis Alliance Network), which is a group of individuals from that industry itself, and the amount of research I had to do before going into this forum and speaking was quite interesting. You know, I look at the cannabis industry overall, and what I see are small businesses. So, I’m very middle of the road on this topic. I see the residents’ standpoint, and I see the business standpoint. It is a small business (environment), first and foremost, and I believe we should treat them as such, and treat them fairly. I’m going to go out on a limb here and say that no other business is required to pay the amount of fees that cannabis does. And the taxes are quite high, too. This concerns me, because, as a result, the illegal industry still thrives behind other doors. I believe that if we readjust tax structure and the way that we do business with (the cannabis industry), we can reduce the amount of illegal activity within the city. Also, at that point, it will allow more funds to stay with these business owners so they can invest their money to reduce odor, and to make other business improvements.

I’m also concerned with where these tax dollars are going, and what we could do with these tax dollars if properly allocated. For instance, look at a city like Desert Hot Springs that was on the brink of bankruptcy. But when they allowed this industry into town, (the city) blossomed. A new revenue stream was created that was able to support the city’s economy. I’m not saying that we want (to create) a large density (of cannabis enterprises), because there has to be a balance within the guidelines of our current policy. And I’m not saying we should put a shop on every corner and three on every street. I think it needs to be measurable and sustainable. We need to diversify the economy throughout the entire city. I think we have an option with building a “green zone” that’s been talked about to lower the tax bracket for some of these businesses and incentivize them. I think that’s a great option, but I want to make sure that those tax dollars go back to where we need to see them. I’d love to see those funds get used properly, and maybe even to deal with the homeless crisis. Maybe we put (those dollars) back into schools and education about drugs and alcohol. There are a ton of positive things that we could do with these tax dollars, instead of just putting them into the general fund to be absorbed. I think if (these dollars) are used properly, then the residents can benefit from it, and that’s the bottom line.

I look at everything in the scope of us always working together, no matter what the situation. How can we incorporate it back into the stream of things to benefit the residents, to benefit the city and to benefit the city employees as well? There are three things that I always look at, in regards to making policy, and if it does not benefit the residents, the city and the stakeholders, then it’s not going to be a “yes” (from me). This is something I’ve always done as a business owner: Does it benefit the business; does it benefit me; and does it benefit my employees? It’s just how I operate, even at home.

Just to clarify, what were you referring to when you talked about a “green zone”?

There’s a “green zone” that they’re looking at creating close to the I-10 freeway, and it’s going to be in District 1. They’re looking at developing that property, very close to the Amtrak station, for some growth opportunity and development. They want these types of businesses to go in there so they will not affect or impact residential areas. I do see the concerns (being raised) in the Desert Highland Gateway Estates and Demuth Park areas, where we’re seeing large scale (cannabis) companies going in, and the communities are offering a little resistance. I think that Veronica Goedhart (from the city of Palm Springs Office of Special Projects/Vacation Rentals and Cannabis) is doing a great job. I would urge any member of the community who has a concern to reach out to her, because she has a wealth of knowledge, particularly regarding how the ordinance is written and how it works.

What can or should be done to decrease crime in Palm Springs?

You have crime anywhere, no matter where we go, and it’s here (in Palm Springs). We have a population of around 44,000 with a voting population of roughly 30,000, so that tells me that there are 30,000 people who live here full-time. And then you have this constant rotation and revolving door of tourists, which adds around 130,000 on a monthly basis. So crime is going to happen. Now, I’m not saying tourists create crime. There are individuals on the tourist side and on the residential side who are ready for a bad time. So, I just think we need to be aware. I think that our police department is aware of the situation at hand, and they understand that we live in a large transient community. But we also live in a community that’s very trusting. My husband is always telling me, “Lock the door! Lock the door!” And I’ll be honest: I’m the first one not to lock the door! I think in regards to crime, our public just needs to be aware of it. We have people who visit us on a regular basis. And now with the vacation rentals, more people who visit us are staying in our neighborhoods. And there are individuals who are displaced or homeless or whatever, and they’re looking. So I think the public just needs to be aware of that and make sure we’re taking care of ourselves, our neighborhoods and the people who live around us.

It’s kind of funny, because I think a lot of that has to do with the way that neighborhoods are integrated. What I mean is: How many people actually know their neighbor’s name now? Do you know who lives two houses down the street? I think that has a big impact with crime. So, I say if we want to reduce crime: Get to know the people around us, and we start looking out for one another again.

What is your reaction to the proposed construction of a downtown 10,000 seat arena by the Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians?

I’ve had my business downtown for five years, and I would have loved to see the completion of the (Agua Caliente) Cultural Center and spa down there. I see it from all sides right now. I see that it’s going to bring rising rents to small businesses, and that concerns me. But I also see it on an economic plane from the city (perspective). We are very lucky that we have this neighboring nation that’s willing to front the $260-plus million to foot the bill for this project. And all that I see is growth. I believe that it can positively impact the reduction of debt, if it is planned properly. And by that, I do not mean that the Agua Caliente tribe is not going to plan properly, because everything they’ve built so far is absolutely beautiful. I want to clarify that. But, I do think there’s a level of logistics that needs to be done hand in hand with the city and the tribe to make this a successful feat across the board. And it all begins with communication and working together. We have to have that relationship with the tribal council again.

We haven’t really had a very strong relationship in the last couple of years, I believe since (former Agua Caliente Chairman Richard) Milanovich died (in 2012). I look at it like these new guys at the helm of the tribal council want to build a successful stadium and business, and I want to see that happen, because I think that everybody can benefit across the board. So, I’m very pro-arena, and I think it can be very successful if the city is given the logistical strategy. I’ve had to talk to (representatives from) several cities across the nation who have brought in arenas much like this one. And (these stadiums) generate almost $100 million per year. And when I look at the revenue that could potentially be gained from the (transient occupancy tax) and sales tax throughout the city because of an addition like this, I’d say that at the low end, we’re talking $20-30 (million). Now, $20-$30 million sounds like a good deal to me as long as we’re prepared for the infrastructure with the roads and public safety and the way we’re going to go about doing business on a daily basis when we have events. So I think that’s where the communication needs to start. And we should look at the environmental impact, and we should look at the long-term effects on neighborhoods that are adjacent to (the proposed site) like the Movie Colony. And we need to devise a working plan on how we’re going to strategize around parking. Would a large off-site parking area with shuttle service be beneficial? We have to look at all of these things.

I think the way that the city of Los Angeles handles parking at the Hollywood Bowl is interesting, for instance. If it’s planned right, it can be very successful. What we need is an open dialogue, not only with the tribe, but with other cities who have experienced the same thing and gone through the process. We can sit down and get on a phone call and just ask, “What works for you? What didn’t work for you?” Let’s make this the most successful arena that the nation has seen. We’re building this project right in the heart of our downtown. It’s not on the outside. It’s not somewhere away from downtown Las Vegas like the Golden Knights arena. And it’s not downtown San Diego, either; it’s Palm Springs. So we just have to make sure that our streets, public safety and the city can support all of it.

Is the city of Palm Springs ready for an economic recession?

It’s a one-word answer: No. It’s true that we’ve made some changes, and we’ve been able to sock away a little money. But looking at the debt, I fear that 2008 is going to come around again, and we’ll have to let go of 100 employees, if not more. I don’t want to see that happen at all. But the continuing growth of debt would have a major impact on that situation. My husband is a union man, and I would never want to see that happen to our family.

I feel that we really need to begin to diversify our economy. We need a solid plan for a way that the city can continue to bring in money, even during the down times of a recession, and it cannot be based on tourism alone. That’s huge. We really need to diversify the businesses we’re bringing into this town. The debt is around $500 million, and we’re going to be faced with tough choices if a recession hits, and it is bigger than the last one.

What’s your idea of the perfect night out in Palm Springs?

For me, since I’ve lived close to downtown in the Movie Colony for years, and I’ve owned a business downtown for the last five years, I can literally walk into a restaurant and have a great meal, then go catch a movie and finish it off with some ice cream. During the winter months, it’s great, and it’s always the best to do just that.

Indian Canyon Drive will soon be a two-way thoroughfare. Yay or nay?

I’m in the middle on this one. I support the conversion, and I think it will help reduce traffic during large-scale downtown events. I know that this decision to change was done before the 10,000-seat arena project was announced, so how traffic is directed on to Indian Canyon when one of these events ends is the only logistic (issue) that concerns me now. It goes back to infrastructure and whether or not we have what we need to support (the arena) traffic. I think if we open ourselves up to conversation with the tribe, then we can plan for it. So I’m still in support of growth happening, and large-scale events happening, and I just want to make sure that whatever we do with infrastructure, we’re making the right choices, and that were not operating on a 30-year-old general plan.

What question should we have asked you that we haven’t so far? And what’s your answer to that question?

The financial issue is the big one for me, and how we operate with our money. I found it surprising that we went from an 800-900 page budget to 50-plus pages in the last couple of years because of the deletion of itemized line items. I think a large part of being transparent with our residents is allowing them to see where we are spending money. And when you look at payroll structure with the city, we are very top-heavy, and it concerns me. I’ve said in the past that I would have never approved the budget (now in effect). I would have directed the city manager to figure it out and balance the deficit. I would have sat there until they approved a balanced budget, no matter how late. I was at that meeting, and it ran late. Also, Councilman J.R. Roberts came out and said in an article in The Desert Sun that the voters are not informed enough to make the right choice and vote (on issues). He contends that this is why we elect people to the City Council. I disagree with that. We are a very smart society, and I hope that any voter thoroughly educates themselves and makes themselves aware of who they are voting for, and that they vote for the most qualified candidate. I would hope to see that we have a diverse array of candidates on that dais that are elected to our city’s offices. They should represent all walks of life. That is going to be key in making sure that we remain successful.

There is a reason why we’ve gone into district elections, and I support having the working people (of our city) represented on the council. It needs to happen. We have not had a Latino candidate (elected) in almost 47 years, since Joe Garcia. And, considering that the Coachella Valley is 53 percent Hispanic, it surprises the hell out of me. Now I look at the demographics in each of the districts, and I think this is a great way to operate, but I have one concern. We allowed a minority district to be formed that has a mass representation of a minority, and we did not carve out minority numbers throughout the city. So, we have in essence said that the minority will have one voice and one vote when it could have been positively distributed across the board. We should not have just gone off of the Census, as old it was, but used the Registrar of Voters data. So, I think there’s somewhat of a misrepresentation there, and I think that we need to re-visit it.

I believe in (campaign) contribution limits, and I do not believe that one individual should be able to donate $10,000 or $50,000 to a campaign. I believe there are things that need to be changed in our city’s election practices. I will try my hardest to make sure that there is a level playing field for anyone who wants to run, if I am elected. That’s no matter what socio-economic status they may have. I believe anybody can offer valuable input at any time, and I think we need to see change today. I hope Palm Springs is ready for a new voice, because I’m ready to serve.

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