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Last updateMon, 24 Aug 2020 12pm

To properly explain how our cat, Buster, is hanging out at Dodger Stadium at a time when we are unable to do so, we need to start the story in June 2006.

We were living in Tucson, Ariz., and it had been about a year since my cat, Beavis, had died. After serious negotiations with my then-boyfriend (and now-husband), Garrett, we decided it was time to bring another feline into our lives. One weekend, we headed to the Humane Society of Southern Arizona to meet some of the cats and kittens up for adoption. I was looking at a cute little grey furball when Garrett pointed to a cage containing two orange-and-white male kittens, about six weeks old. One of the kittens, then named Yoda—presumably because of the tufts of white hair sprouting out his ears—was nervously sitting in the back of his cage. The other, then named Kiku, was hanging on the wire door, mewling his extreme displeasure at anyone and everyone who passed by.

“If we get two cats, they won’t be alone when we’re not home,” Garrett said.

So we went over to meet them. Yoda remained nervous. When picked up Kiku to give him a look, he reached out and clawed my upper lip.

“Handsome, you’re going to be paying for that for the rest of your life,” I said.

After they received the requisite neutering and vaccinations, we took Yoda and Kiku home. Yoda became Maeby, and Kiku became Buster. (I was a big Arrested Development fan at the time.) As beloved pets do, Maeby and Buster became family.

Maeby, the fluffier one, transformed from a skittish, nervous kitten into, no exaggeration, the sweetest creature I have encountered on this planet. He exuded joy—whenever someone picked him up, he’d reflexively begin kneading with happiness—and loved being social whenever friends would come over. He enjoyed playing fetch, but we had to be careful when taking him outside, because he could escape from any harness placed upon him.

Buster, the shorter-haired one, turned into the alpha of the pack—at least in his own mind. While he and Maeby adored each other, he’d chew off Maeby’s whiskers when we weren’t looking. He could be just as loving and as social as Maeby, but he was also perfectly happy to hang out by himself, whereas Maeby wanted attention whenever possible. Buster had one obsession—bugs. Whenever one was spotted inside the house, it would demand his rapt attention.

In early 2013, we had decided to move to Palm Springs; this meant uprooting Buster and Maeby from the only home they had known. While they HATED the car trip here—they always hated car trips, associating them with vet visits—they settled into their new home in Palm Springs nicely. However, several months after the move, Maeby got very ill—he had an impacted hairball in his colon. He was also given another diagnosis: He was in the early stages of kidney disease.

After emergency surgery and a short hospital stay, Maeby came home and fully recovered—although we were told to shave his gorgeous fur to cut down on the chances of a recurrence. While he didn’t care much for the clipper jobs, they didn’t ruin his happy, ever-loving nature. He remained his sweet self until suffering an apparent stroke. In 2015, at the age of 9, our Maeby passed away.

Maeby’s death transformed Buster. While his base personality remained the same, and he still had occasional moments of solitude, he became an attention freak: When he was in the mood, he insisted on attention. If there was a lap open, he was on it, and if there wasn’t a lap open, he would wait, not-so-patiently, until there was. The picture posted here was taken one night as he waited for me to finish dinner so he could have access to my lap—and, more importantly, get belly rubs

Shortly after Maeby’s passing, Buster, too, was diagnosed with early-stage kidney disease. But as of his regular checkup last March—right as the world was shutting down—his kidney levels were OK, and his overall health was good.

Buster was quite happy with the lockdown, because it meant that both of his dads were working from home and rarely went anywhere—meaning he got more attention, belly rubs and snuggles.

Early in the summer, we noticed that Buster was getting skinnier. His food bowl didn’t empty as quickly as before, and as the days passed, it started barely emptying at all. While Buster was as loving—and insistent on belly rubs—as ever, he had moments of lethargy. The final straw came when we noticed he wasn’t cleaning his fur as well as he always had: It was time to subject our 14-year-old Buster to the cross-town car trip to the vet. (Our cats went to Banfield Pet Hospital; shortly after Buster’s March visit, they closed down the nearby Palm Springs location, meaning we had to drive him to Palm Desert.)

We dropped him off on the morning of Friday, July 24; several hours later, the vet called with the news: His kidney levels were off the charts. Buster was very sick. He had only a few days left, and he could start having seizures at any time.

We had a brief discussion, and decided that it was time to let Buster go. We told the vet we’d return to say goodbye.


One of the most awful things about this damned pandemic is that it’s robbed us of our coping devices—the things we use to deal with the travails life brings us. Going to the gym, happy hour with friends, a summer vacation … nope, not possible right now.

The timing of Buster’s death coincided with the blessed return of one of my coping devices: baseball. I am a huge Los Angeles Dodgers fan. In normal times, I watch at least half of the team’s games on TV, and I try to get to Dodger Stadium once or twice a year to take in a game.

While Major League Baseball is back (at least as of this writing … you never know what COVID-19 has in store for the future), it’s different. Some of the rules have been changed; players are asked to keep their distance from each other in the dugout; and, most notably, there are no fans in the stands.

Well, actually, there are fans … sort of.

The Dodgers, as well as other teams, are allowing people to purchase fan cutouts, which are then placed in seats at the stadium. (Fun fact: A cutout of the eponymous corpse from Weekend at Bernie’s currently sits behind home plate at Kansas City Royals games.) In the Dodgers’ case, all of the proceeds, except for the $11.25 value of the cutout, go to the nonprofit Los Angeles Dodgers Foundation.

The Dodgers aren’t just allowing human cutouts at the stadium; they’re allowing pets, too. So … because we can’t go to Dodger games in person this year, and because the bulk of the $149 fee goes to a good cause, we decided to send Buster, in cutout form, to Dodger Stadium on our behalf.

On Saturday, Aug. 8, as we watched the Dodgers play the San Francisco Giants on TV, we spotted Buster in the stands. The sight led to biggest smile I’ve had on my face since March.

Published in Pets

Earlier this week, we asked you, our amazing readers, to answer a short, six-question survey about this Daily Digest—and more than 200 of you took the time to do so. We thank all of you who did.

Here are some takeaways:

• The majority of you (53.8 percent) said you preferred getting the Daily Digest three days per week—while 36.3 percent said you’d ideally like to receive it five times per week. However, some of the comments led us to believe that a lot of you who said you preferred three days per week did so because we talked about the time constraints we were under. So, moving forward, we’ll continue to do the Digest at least three days per week.

• More than 61.3 percent of you said you’d like the Daily Digest to include all news, not just COVID-19-related news. Therefore, in the coming weeks, we’ll broaden the range of news links included.

• The vast majority of you said exceedingly nice things about the digest’s tone and construction. We thank you all for that; we don’t plan on changing much there.

• The biggest complaint about the Daily Digest was the fact that some links are to publications with metered pay walls—meaning you can only read so many articles for free until you’re forced to subscribe. Unfortunately … there’s nothing we can do about this. We’ll do our best to link to as many free news sources as possible—but since some of the country’s best news sources have paywalls (The Wall Street Journal, The New York Times, The Washington Post, Los Angeles Times, etc.), they’re unavoidable. We know we’re largely preaching to the choir here, but it’s worth repeating: Good writing and reporting costs money to produce. That means the aforementioned news sources have every right to ask people to pay for it.

• This leads us to the Independent’s Supporters of the Independent program. First: Thanks again to all of you who have, will and/or continue to support us. It’s appreciated, and it’s helping us keep the figurative lights on. Second: To those of you who said you want to support us, but don’t know how, click on this sentence to go to our Supporters page. We use PayPal, so it’s easy to do. Third: To those of you who expressed guilt about being unable to support us financially: Please do not feel guilty. Times are tough—as tough as they’ve been since the Great Depression. We understand, and that’s why we make our publication, both online and print, free to everyone. When the time comes that you have a few bucks to truly spare, then please consider supporting us—but don’t sweat it until that happy time comes.

• Some of you said you didn’t know much about the Independent and/or the primary writer of this here Daily Digest. Well, here’s a quick primer I, Jimmy Boegle, wrote back in May. If you’re unfamiliar with our print version, here’s our entire archive—all 85 editions going back to our first one in April 2013. And, of course, all of our content going back to our first postings in October 2012 can be found at CVIndependent.com.

Thank you yet again to all of you who responded. If you have questions or concerns I didn’t address here, send me an email, and I’ll be happy to answer. And finally, to all of you. Thanks for reading. That’s why we do what we do.

Enough yammering about ourselves. Here’s the news of the day:

• I was again a guest on the I Love Gay Palm Springs podcast this week. I joined hosts Shann Carr, John Taylor and Brad Fuhr to talk to Dr. Laura Rush and Palm Springs Mayor Geoff Kors. Other guests joined the podcast as well; check it out!

• We previously mentioned that the city of Palm Springs had said that bars (serving food) and restaurants in the city (currently operating only outdoors) have to close at 11 p.m. for the time being. Well, after receiving some complaints, the city has extended that closure time to midnight.

RIP, Herman Cain. The former GOP presidential candidate and COVID-19/mask-wearing skeptic, who attended President Donald Trump’s infamous rally in Tulsa, died yesterday at the age of 74 due to the virus.

• It’s official: The national economy during the second quarter suffered from an unprecedented collapse due to the coronavirus and the resulting shutdowns.

• Wisconsin yesterday became the latest state to require that people wear face masks in public. However, Republicans in the state Legislature there seem determined to strike down Gov. Tony Evers’ order. Sigh.

Vanity Fair published something of a bombshell yesterday, saying that a team led by Jared Kushner had developed a comprehensive COVID-19 testing plan—but it was shelved, in part, because the coronavirus then was primarily hitting Democratic-led states.

• Please pay attention to this, folks, as it’s really important: U.S. Postal Service backlogs continue to amount, as the Trump administration attacks and starves the agency in multiple waysand this could cause huge problems with mail ballots during the election.

• Pay attention to this, too: The U.S. Census Bureau is being pressured by the Trump administration to wrap up the oh-so-important once-a-decade count earlysomething that has Democrats rather alarmed.

A sad milestone: For the first confirmed time, a Californian under the age of 18 has died from the coronavirus.

• Listen to the president! Yes, really, in this instance: On the heels of reports that the FDA is getting ready to allow a more-widespread use of convalescent blood plasma to treat COVID-19 patients, President Trump yesterday encouraged people who had recovered from COVID-19 to donate.

Got goggles? Dr. Anthony Fauci recommended wearing them in addition to a face covering, if possible, to offer more protection from this nasty virus.

• The Wall Street Journal takes a look at the first wave of lawsuits being filed against employers who allegedly did not do all they could to protect their employees from SARS-CoV-2.

An NPR investigation found that a multi-million dollar contract the Trump administration awarded to a company to collect COVID-19 data from hospitals—something the CDC had already been doing capably—raises a whole lot of alarming questions.

• The $600 in extra unemployment benefits from the federal government is expiring, in large part due to claims that it’s acted as a disincentive for people to go back to work. However, a new Yale study indicates that those claims are not based in reality.

• The government has 44 million N95 masks stockpiled, with another half-billion on order. However, those masks aren’t getting to the professionals who need them in a prompt manner. Key quote: “It’s like we’re in the middle of a hurricane here. They should not be stockpiling PPE,” said Bob Gibson, vice president of the 1199 SEIU United Healthcare Workers East, the largest such union in Florida. “It should be given to the frontline health workers. They have been in this fight for five months now, and they are exhausted.”

The U.S. Mint kindly requests that you spend the coins you have, because there aren’t enough of them in circulation right now.

• Remember that huge Twitter hack several weeks back that essentially shut down all verified accounts? Well, feds say they’ve arrested the mastermind … 17-year-old Graham Ivan Clark.

• If you’re a baseball fan like me … savor this weekend’s games, as things could get shut down as soon as Monday, according to the MLB commissioner.

Hong Kong is postponing legislative elections for a year due to the coronavirus—something that has pro-democracy folks quite alarmed. That couldn’t happen here. Right?

• Experts writing for The Conversation say that some 800,000 low-income households may have recently had their electricity disconnected. Blame the COVID-19-related shutdown—and lawmakers who aren’t doing enough to intervene.

• Also from The Conversation: Older, under-maintained schools in poorer areas were dangerous to begin with—and they’ll be even more dangerous if students are forced to return to them as the pandemic rages.

• We’ve talked in this space a LOT about the various vaccines being tested—but it’s likely that those vaccines, even if proven to be generally effective, won’t work on everyone. Well, MIT is using machine learning to design a vaccine that would cover a lot more people.

• Sweden has not done a whole lot to shut down its economy—and a lot of people have died there from COVID-19 as a result. Still … the curve is being flatted there. How and why? Will it last? MedPage Today looks into it.

An Arenas Road bar is poised to reopen (for outdoor dining) on Aug. 9, thanks to a brand-new kitchen. See what Chill Bar has planned.

• Finally, from the Independent: Get outside when temps are only in the 90s and check out what the skies have to offer in August—including the Perseids meteor shower

Folks, we’ve survived another month. Who knows what August will bring? Stay tuned to find out. Have a great weekend; the Daily Digest will be back Monday.

Published in Daily Digest

There was no Palm Springs Power baseball on Friday, May 29—what was supposed to be team’s opening day.

Rather than an umpire calling out “Play ball!” and cheers from the crowd wafting on hot evening breezes, Palm Springs Stadium—like virtually all baseball stadiums around the country—was empty, due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

“We’re hopeful that we’re going to be able to play some sort of season later in the summer,” said Power vice president of baseball operations Justin Reschke during a recent phone interview. “Kind of the silver lining in this is that the college players who would come out to play for the team are (uncertain) if they’re going back to school, and they are very eager to play. We have local players, and even from other parts of Southern California, who are close enough to commute back and forth for Power games. So we’re not looking at bringing in 30-35 (collegiate) players from all over the country—like we normally would—and having them stay with host families like we have (in the past).

The Power is usually the leading team in the Southern California Collegiate Baseball League, and consists of college players—usually, at least—from around the country.

“If, at some point this summer,” Reschke said, “we’re allowed to open up and host games for even a small number of fans, that would be kind of our ultimate goal. So we don’t have a definite plan for the Power, but we have players who are eager to play. We have coaches who are willing to get on the field. We’ve heard from dozens of fans who call our office every week for an update. We’re ready to go as soon as we’re able to—but we’re not going to jump the gun and do something before it’s safe and before we’re sure that it’s the right decision.”

In the meantime, team owner Andrew Starke and Reschke have other baseball enterprises that will operate this summer despite the pandemic

“We also operate the Palm Springs Collegiate League, which is a league for all levels of college baseball players,” Reschke said. “Whereas the Power team is mostly focused on Division I college players from all over the country, the collegiate league is focused on Division I, Division III, NAIA (National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics) players and junior-college players. Last year, we had 10 teams in the PSCL, all playing in the mornings at Palm Springs Stadium. The goal (for the players) is to play some summer ball, so that when they go back to campus in the fall, they have improved their game, and they can compete for a more prominent role on their school team.”

The Power brain trust has moved this year’s PSCL program to a little town called Ranger, Texas, onto to the campus of Ranger College.

“The biggest (attraction) was that, in the county where this school is located, they’ve only had four cases (of SARS-CoV-2 virus), and they haven’t had a new case since the middle of April,” Reschke said.

(Since we spoke to Reschke, that total had, as of today, risen to seven, not counting a possible nursing-home cluster.)

“We like the isolation of it,” Reschke said. “And we like that we can go and, essentially, take over this whole college campus for a month and play all of our games in that type of (closed) environment. Everything will be self-contained. The players will be staying on campus, playing there and eating there. The players can get their work in, because a lot of them will not have stepped on a baseball field since March, and they’re eager to get out there.”

Back to Palm Springs and the 2020 Power season, we asked about protocols that might be necessary for players, staff, fans, etc., to observe while operating safely and confidently during games at Palm Springs Stadium.

“We have started to put together our plan,” Reschke said. “Because if Gov. Newsom says sports can resume, and … we can have gatherings of, say, 50 people or whatever (the number) is, we’ve got to be ready to go at a moment’s notice. We’ve reviewed the protocols that the NFL will be using when they return—and obviously, those are a lot more beefed up than what we may be able to do—but we’re looking at what some of the MLB proposals are as well. We’re definitely looking at social-distancing factors, and luckily, Palm Springs Stadium is big enough. It has a seating capacity of around 4,000 (spectators). So if we’re talking a couple of hundred fans in the stands, we can absolutely make sure that (everyone’s) spread out. We’ve got (spray) misters all over the stadium, so wherever they sit, they’re going to be comfortable. We’ll follow whatever local guidelines there are for face masks, and for checking the temperatures of customers who enter the business. Whatever it takes, that’s what we’ll do.

“From the players’ side, we’ve looked at everything from what’s being done with the Korean Baseball Organization, which has been playing for a few weeks now in Korea, with umpires and coaches wearing masks. We’re looking at doing some social distancing with our players, like having players who aren’t actively in the game sit in the stands or stay in the clubhouse while spread apart, because we have two very large clubhouses in the Palm Springs Stadium.”

Fortunately, the potential lost season has not caused an insurmountable financial obstacle for the operation.

“From a revenue standpoint, we do generate revenue from our PSCL, because those players pay a fee to participate in that,” Reschke said. “We generate revenue from our California Winter League, which is kind of the same thing (as the PSCL), but for professional players and aspiring professional players. Those are the two (initiatives) that drive our business (model). The Power is more for the community and the players we commit to giving a spot to play for the summer, as well as the coaches that we work with. Of course, it’s for the community, No. 1, and certainly we want to have fans in the stands so we can entertain them, and let them come in and have a hot dog and a beer and enjoy baseball the way it should be enjoyed.

The Power may play games without fans as well.

“It’s about getting the players on the field. It’s about having something for them,” Reschke said. “We’re there in the stadium whether fans are there, too, or not, so we might as well use it and have something going on. I guess our biggest expense would be turning the lights on, so if there’s no fans, maybe we look at playing earlier in the day—say, in the mornings, when it’s cooler.”

Reschke concluded on an upbeat note: “We’ll be focused first on getting players back on the field, and then we’ll be looking at whether we can have 50 fans, or 200 fans—and what does that look like? Hopefully, there will be some good news, and we’ll see. Obviously, there are a lot of questions.”

For more information, visit palmspringspowerbaseball.com.

Published in Features

On this week's pumpkin-spice-flavored weekly Independent comics page: This Modern World watches how conservatives respond to an extinction-level event; Jen Sorenson fears a taxing day at the polls; The K Chronicles enjoys some youth baseball; Apoca Clips watches as Li'l Trumpy and Li'l Kayne babble; and Red Meat prepares for a big date.

Published in Comics

On this week's midsummer classic weekly Independent comics page: The K Chronicles pays tribute to Jackie Robinson; This Modern World hears from the invisible hand of the free market; Jen Sorenson goes camping; Red Meat plays a new video game; and Apoca Clips covers the meeting between Trumpy and Putin.

Published in Comics

I recently rented out my room through AirBNB to a Smog City Brewing Co. employee. Located in Torrance, the 5-year-old brewery has quickly developed a cult following for its quality, flavorful beers. I was giddy when he brought with him a dozen of Smog City’s delicious stouts, IPAs and sours.

That same weekend, I stayed in La Quinta, at Jim Lefebvre’s house. I got to sip on some Hoptonic IPA with a baseball legend.

I learned more about baseball in that one weekend than I had in my entire life. The 1965 National League Rookie of the Year while he played for the World Series champion Los Angeles Dodgers, Lefebvre was named to the All-Star Game in 1966. He played in Japan from 1973-76, then returned to the big leagues as a coach. He managed the Seattle Mariners, the Chicago Cubs and the Milwaukee Brewers, and managed China’s national baseball team during the Beijing Olympics.

His charisma and his passion for the game are astounding. He believes in developing better players through better planning, tools, collaboration and teaching.

“Kids love to have something to be challenged to,” he said. “They want to have incentives to be rewarded. … Every single player I know had to deal with some form of adversity to prove to people they can play. When somebody challenged them (that they could not do a certain thing), they did it. That’s what we have to create in our sport. That’s my whole objective and my whole movement. Let’s get the coaches involved. Let’s get them to train certain techniques in the player development program and then make it happen.”

Nothing is more American than baseball and beer. And with the sudsy craft-beer revolution in full force, there’s no need to drink beer for the masses: You can now enjoy Clayton Kershaw’s curveball while sipping a craft beer.

The clocks have sprung forward; spring training is more than halfway finished; and Major League Baseball’s regular season begins April 3. If you head down Interstate 10 to see a game, you’ll be glad to know that Dodger Stadium added craft beer to its lineup in 2013 and has continued to add Los Angeles craft offerings.

Goose Island and Golden Road will likely have the largest presence at Dodger Stadium. Pro-tip: Golden Road’s Better Weather IPA and Ballast Point Brewing’s Grapefruit Sculpin are great choices for tailgating, because cans are easily portable.

For smaller craft options, check out the loge-level concourse and the relatively new Think Blue Bars. The taps rotate, but past sightings included Fireman’s Brew Brunette, Eagle Rock Brewing’s Revolution XPA, Dudes’ Brewing, Stone Brewing Co. Arrogant Bastard Ale, Anchor Brewing Company Anchor Steam Beer, El Segundo Brewing’s Blue House Citra Pale Ale and Angel City’s Witbier. Confirmed craft brews for the 2016 season include Firemans Brew Blonde and Brunette.

Down in Orange County, Angel Stadium also has a nice selection, offering craft beers such as Bootlegger's Brewery Palomino American Pale Ale, New Belgium Brewing Ranger, Stone Brewing Co. Arrogant Bastard Ale and Hangar 24 Brewery Betty. (Hangar 24 also offers its Ballpark Beer, a blend of a classic pilsner with an American wheat beer.)

Of course San Diego’s PetCo Park is also in on the craft scene with San Diego locals like Ballast Point, Alesmith, Mike Hess, Karl Strauss, Coronado, Lost Abbey and Stone. Don’t miss Stone’s rooftop beer garden at the ballpark, with 12 different beers on tap.

Back at Dodger Stadium, here are some awesome nearby craft-beer spots to check out:

Sunset Beer Company is in Echo Park at 1498 Sunset Blvd. It’s tucked away in a nondescript mini mall, so you could easily miss it—but with more than 800 craft bottled beers (with only a $2 bottle/corkage fee) for purchase and 12 rotating taps, it’s definitely worth a visit.

Just 1.2 miles away from the stadium, also on Sunset Blvd. (2141 Sunset Blvd.), is the ever-popular craft beer bar Mohawk Bend. With 70 taps that include beers like Kern River’s Just Outstanding IPA, Bottle Logic Recursion 8.0, Mother Earth Cali Creamin’ cream ale with vanilla and Refuge Blood Orange Wit, there’s something to please every palate.

Beer. It’s always been American as baseball, and now the craft revolution has taken hold not just in our breweries, bars, grocery stores and homes, but also in the stands. America’s national pastime’s beer lineup is now a whole lot tastier.

Play ball!

Published in Beer

On this week's extra-potent Independent comics page: The K Chronicles celebrates the start of football season; Jen Sorenson examines what Miley Cyrus has done to devolve the teddy bear; The City listens to a not-so-touching expression of love; and Red Meat prepares to burst lasers out of nipples.

Published in Comics

Javier Avila and Calani Raceles are two young men with mental challenges doing the unimaginable—playing baseball.

“At first, my son didn’t even want to show up. He couldn’t catch a ball, let alone hold a bat. Through this program, his hand-eye coordination skills have improved, and he can do all those things,” says Enia Raceles, Calani’s mother. “Now he looks forward to each Friday so he can hit again and talk to his baseball friends.”

Both Javier and Calani are players in the Challenger division of Coachella Little League. The program is made up of more than 20 physically and mentally challenged young people with disabilities including autism, Down syndrome and cerebral palsy. The division started in 2010 and is the only one in the Coachella Valley.

“As the only division of its kind here in the Coachella Valley, we want to teach everyone with a disability that you can play a sport and that it is possible,” says Esmeralda Ortega, vice president of the Challenger division.

Every Friday at 7 p.m. at Bagdouma Park, 51723 Douma St., these young people get together under the guidance of dedicated volunteers of all ages. Together, they work on the fundamentals of hitting and catching and conclude with a game against each other or against another team.

But this isn’t an ordinary game: No score is kept. There are no outs recorded, and each player must bat and record a hit before the next side can do so.

“Most teenagers get together on Friday nights, go to the movies, hang out, play video games,” says Alex Rodriguez, secretary of the Challenger division. “For these kids, this is their Friday night, getting together on a Friday night with their friends outside of school, and they play baseball.

“They’re just like me and you. They have drama, hopes, dreams. Only a disability separates us.”

Javier’s father, Jose Avila, is grateful that this program exists and wishes more programs like these were available for children like his son.

“A lot of these kids can’t do much like me and you. Programs like these help increase hand-eye coordination, motor skills, sportsmanship and, above all, socialization,” says Avila. “Here, they’re not outsiders, but just another person like me and you. Here, disabilities don’t exist and friendships are formed.”

To join or volunteer with Challenger division, please contact Esmeralda Ortega at (760) 972-9053 or Alex Rodriguez at (760) 238-2690. Johnny Flores Jr. is a reporter for Coachella Unincorporated, a youth media startup in the East Coachella Valley, funded by the Building Healthy Communities Initiative of the California Endowment and operated by New America Media in San Francisco. The purpose is to report on issues in the community that can bring about change. “Coachella Unincorporated” refers to the region youth journalists cover, but also to the unincorporated communities of the Eastern Valley with the idea to “incorporate” the East Valley into the mainstream Coachella Valley mindset. For more information, visit coachellaunincorporated.org.

Published in Features