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Tradition, tradition, my sweet Lorde—a Pappy and Harriet’s tradition continued with a surprise show after midnight on Friday/Saturday at the storied adobe bar in Pioneertown.

Lorde, aka Ella Yelich-O’Connor, continued the tradition of secret, last-minute shows at Pappy’s, disclosing her first full-length performance since December 2014 with a simple tweet earlier in the day. She followed in the footsteps of Bon Iver playing a secret pre-Coachella warm-up under the nom de guerre of Mouthoil in 2013; the Pixies celebrating a return to Coachella in 2014; and Sir Paul McCartney’s Oldchella mini-gig last October that created the biggest traffic jam ever in Pioneertown.

Lorde’s shocker of a show had me scrambling, but I was able to make it for the hour-long warm-up gig, during which she introduced three new songs and played plenty of material from 2013’s Pure Heroine. Unfortunately, I was not allowed to bring in a pro camera, so I was only able to get some snapshots of the venue; the photo above is from her 2014 Coachella performance.

The show was slated to start at midnight, and security had all ticketholders line up in the outdoor stage area, since Wanda Jackson performed a 9 p.m. show inside. There was more security than usual—and lots of people running around with a sense of urgency, with VIPs, mostly family, entering first.

I waited in line with a group of fans from Long Beach who were able to obtain six of the $20 tickets before they sold out. The door’s opening led to a quick security check and a mad scramble toward the stage. I spied Nancy Hunt, owner of the boutique Brat, in Santa Monica, who seems to be at every sold-out show at Pappy’s, but for the most part, the crowd was new to Pappy’s, based on the informal survey I took while in line.

The show started about 12:20 a.m. with an intro tease of new single “Green Light,” as many fans did their best Statute of Liberty impressions with cell phones rising high in the sky for most of the show. Lorde was very comfortable and chatty, saying, “This is what I like about a small place,” before she was interrupted by fans stating where they drove from: “Oh, you came from L.A.? You from Nashville, today?” It felt like she was playing for close friends—something you rarely see from a pop star with fans only feet and inches away, and something that won’t happen at Coachella on Sunday.

Lorde teed up the crowd: “So I wanna try something that no one knows about yet. I wanna play you something from the new record. It’s kind of like one of my favorite things I think I’ve done. It’s a two-part song, but they’re very different. They’re what the core of this album is about.” A fan finished her sentence by yelling, “Sober!” which is a song from her upcoming second album, Melodrama. She replied: “Fuck, you guessed it! I really need you with me for this,” and a request was made to turn down the blue, cavern-like lighting. Lorde drove spectators wild as she sang, “My hips have missed your hips … what will we do when we’re sober?” partially hanging from the stage right “punk pole” used by many to just hold on during more raucous shows.

Lorde expressed how happy she was to play a live show again: “Thank you so much, wow, cool, I miss you so much.” Then came more news: “This song is a little ghost. I felt like a little ghost when I wrote this one. I walked until I could not walk anymore and I called a cab. … When I was writing, I felt like was in high school. Oh, I see my sister in standing in the back. It’s called ‘Liability.’”  

Lucky ticket-holders were treated to an “old” Lorde hit, “Royals,” which had a few Pappy’s staffers behind the bar singing along with the chorus.

Lorde shouted out to the crowd, “Thank you very much. How you doing out there? What do you want to know?” A fan asked, “What have you been doing?” She responded: “I bought a house in New Zealand, and I don’t garden yet, but I’ve been going to the beach.”

She hinted that the end of the night was near: “It’s a great one tonight. I want to get pretty down for the last two songs. I want you to dance like you’re alone in your bedroom, and you don’t give a fuck. Are you in?” Lorde then ended with “Team” and “Green Light,” the latter off her highly anticipated sophomore release.

As she knelt on a corner sub-woofer, Lorde said her goodbye: “Thank you so much Pappy and Harriet’s.”

Published in Reviews

From the time it was announced through Lady Gaga’s late addition as a headliner fill-in for the pregnant Beyoncé, this year’s Coachella lineup has been one of the most questioned and talked-about ever.

Beyond the headliners, however, there are always gems among the names in the smaller font on the poster. Here are some acts I’ll make sure to see—and I recommend that you check them out, too.


Friday, April 14 and 21

Tacocat

The name is funny, and so is some of the music, but this Seattle band, around since 2007, has a seriously interesting punk-rock sound. Three of the band’s four members are women, and during an interview with VICE, bassist Bree McKenna claimed that she was the illegitimate child of Megadeth frontman Dave Mustaine. She was kidding … we think. Don’t dawdle on Friday; get to Coachella early to catch this band’s feminist messages, humor and sarcasm.

Preservation Hall Jazz Band

I always love the variety of music showcased at Coachella throughout the weekend—and seeing the Preservation Hall Jazz Band will be a real treat. This legendary New Orleans jazz band has been going since 1963, and an impressive list of musicians has come through the band. The group also recently appeared on the Foo Fighters’ album Sonic Highways. The band played Coachella in 2014—and it felt like you couldn’t escape them. Beyond the band’s scheduled set, the group showed up in the Heineken tent to perform with Angelo Moore of Fishbone, and also appeared with Arcade Fire later in the evening. For a minute, I thought I might even see them busking in the parking lot.

Father John Misty

I’m so happy that Father John Misty is not scheduled at the same time as Radiohead’s headliner set. I included Father John Misty in my Coachella suggestions in both 2013 and in 2015—and both sets were amazing, so there’s no reason to think he won’t be blowing minds again in 2017. The former Fleet Foxes drummer has come a long way as a solo artist. His indie-folk sound has a lot going on in it, and his songs are deep—and often hilarious. Definitely make sure you catch Father John Misty; you won’t be disappointed.


Saturday, April 15 and 22

Yip Yops, Kayves

A different local band or two is announced as a Coachella performer, playing early on a stage, a few days before both Weekend 1 and Weekend 2. CIVX (now Killjoi), Machin’, EeVaan Tre, Alchemy, Brightener and The Flusters have played in this slot. Who will play this year? We received the answer for Weekend 1 today: Kayves on Friday, and Yip Yops on Saturday. As for Weekend 2, worthy contenders include The BrosQuitos, Hive Minds and the reigning Independent Best of Coachella Valley Best Local Band, Venus and the Traps. Locals: Go and support the bands are selected!

Warpaint

Psychedelic pop/rock band Warpaint (upper right) turns in live performances that soak attendees in dark psychedelic vibes—no frills necessary. The group’s most recent album, last year’s Heads Up, took the band in more of a pop direction, but let me assure you: The album is fantastic, and was one of my favorites of 2016. The tracks “New Song” and “So Good” get stuck in your head—and you only want to hear more.

Thundercat

Flying Lotus protege Thundercat is a musician on the rise. After releasing his latest album, Drunk, in February, he’s gotten bigger thanks to the buzz that has surrounded it. Thundercat’s electronic funk mixed with soul somehow sounds both futuristic and traditional. His bass grooves on Drunk are so damn smooth, and his collaborations with people such as Kenny Loggins and Michael McDonald are weird and fantastic at the same time. It’s hard to believe this guy was once playing bass for Suicidal Tendencies.

The Head and the Heart

I saw The Head and the Heart’s set at Coachella in 2014, where I learned the band’s folk sound could work well at Stagecoach, too. The Head and the Heart remind me a lot of The Lone Bellow, because the songs are deep, yet The Head and the Heart also can play in styles similar to Fleet Foxes, Iron and Wine, and even Vampire Weekend. The band writes more complex parts for the mandolin and fiddle than most Americana bands.


Sunday, April 16 and 23

Toots and the Maytals

Goldenvoice has put some great reggae legends on the Coachella stage—and Toots and the Maytals, one of the great reggae/ska bands of the early ’60s, is the latest band that is part of that welcome trend. Toots Hibbert (below) is a reggae legend who has the voice of a soul singer; he’s written some of reggae’s greatest songs, and has performed with acts such as the Red Hot Chili Peppers, Major Lazer, Eric Clapton, Keith Richards of the Rolling Stones, and many others.

Hans Zimmer

This one makes me laugh every time I look at the Coachella lineup. One of my friends who worked in the film industry at Warner Bros. asked me, “Hans Zimmer ... how does that work, exactly?” The legend who has created the scores for films such as The Dark Knight, The Lion King, Inception and many other blockbusters is definitely an odd addition to the lineup … but I have a feeling he’s going to silence anyone who made fun of his inclusion, even though I have no idea what his performance will entail. Who knows … maybe Goldenvoice can get Philip Glass to perform in the future?

Future Islands

In 2014, I went Pappy and Harriet’s before Coachella started to watch The Pixies. As I was leaving Pappy’s, one of the owners, Linda Krantz, asked if I was staying for the very late performance of Future Islands; I declined. While at Coachella the next day, I took a short nap on the grass in the media area right behind the Gobi tent … and was woken up by a catchy bass line. I got up and walked into the Gobi to watch Future Islands, which had just started the set. I was blown away, and I can’t wait to see Future Islands at Coachella again.

New Order

New Order is made up of the surviving members of Joy Division (now minus bassist Peter Hook) and was one of the biggest bands of the ’80s and ’90s. Take note: Bernard Sumner is known to be a serial complainer during performances. When I caught the band’s set at Coachella in 2013, Sumner bitched throughout—to the sound engineer about a botched intro (before the band even played a note), and about headliner Phoenix, which was playing on the Main Stage at the same time. That aside, the band turned in a great performance. Expect some great visuals and music to dance to—things any Coachella attendee will appreciate. 

Updated on April 11 after release of set times.

Published in Previews

Many music fans know about Australian psych-rock band Tame Impala—but they probably don’t know about Pond, even though the band has featured and continues to feature various members of Tame Impala.

Here’s the current breakdown: Pond’s frontman is former Tame Impala touring member Nick Allbrook, and the band includes Tame Impala member Jay “Gumby” Watson. Other Pond members are Shiny Joe Ryan, Jamie Terry and Ginole.

In between performances at Coachella on Sunday, April 16 and 23, Pond will be playing at Pappy and Harriet’s on Monday, April 17.

During a recent phone interview from Australia, Jay Watson told me why so many bands from Australia have made a splash in the United States over the last decade.

“If you think about it proportionately, (the number of bands to find success) is probably the same as it is in the United States,” Watson said. “There are, like, 23 million people here. I know it’s kind of easy and fun to think of it as this obscure place.”

Both Tame Impala and Pond are known for melding psychedelic music and rock. Watson said it’s not really a challenge to mix the two together.

“We just try to make stuff that has melodies we like,” he said. “… I guess we like stuff that sounds weird. That’s why it sounds psychedelic, or whatever word you want to use. We always try to make it sound weirder and have stronger songwriting at the same time.

“I guess we haven’t thought about making something sound psychedelic. … We just listen to a bunch of stuff and then squish it all together. If you’ve been listening to a lot of old Brian Eno and a lot of the new Rhianna album, (our music) is probably going to come out somewhere in between,” he said with a laugh. “I think it’s a really transparent process to where we’re digging on things, and it finds its way into the music.”

A new Pond album, The Weather, will be released on May 5.

“It might be a bit more conceited,” Watson said about the new album. “… We didn’t just throw in every idea that we had, which Pond has been known for in the past. I think (the new album) covers a lot of ground. There’s rock ’n’ roll stuff on there; there are samples from old records, and even hip-hop stuff, and electronic stuff, and it’s really freaky noise. I think it jumps around a lot in 40 minutes. It feels like longer.”

Considering Pond’s recorded music includes all of those aforementioned elements, the band members must find ways improvise during live shows.

“It’s kind of like covering your own songs,” Watson said about performing live. “When we record our albums, two or three of us record all the instruments. On some of the songs, I might be the only person on the song. On some of the songs, it might be Joe as the only person on the songs. As a five-piece (performing live), we kind of delegate parts of the songs. We even have electronics on tracks, like the horns, saxophones and trombones.”

Watson said he enjoys touring in the United States.

“I find it interesting that you go through the middle of the country,” he said. “In Australia, you wouldn’t go through the middle. That’s always intriguing. But there are a lot of nice older venues in America. I like the theaters, and they are some of the nicest theaters in the world. It’s kind of like Australia in that (the U.S.) has a wide range of landscapes. You don’t have tropical, but you have the desert, and you have the Pacific Northwest. Over a month, you get to see a bunch of different landscapes, which is interesting.”

In addition to performing on Sundays at Coachella, Pond will perform with Nicolas Jaar and Floating Points at 8 p.m., Monday, April 17, at Pappy and Harriet’s Pioneertown Palace, 53688 Pioneertown Road, in Pioneertown. Tickets are currently listed as sold out. For more information, call 760-365-5956, or visit pappyandharriets.com.

Published in Previews

Can a punk band have a serious message and still be a fun listen? The Interrupters have answered that question—with a resounding yes.

On Friday, April 14 and 21, the Los Angeles two-tone punk band will be making its Coachella debut.

Fronted by female vocalist Aimee Interrupter, the band also includes the Bivona brothers: Kevin (guitar), Justin (bass) and Jesse (drums). You may recognize Kevin Bivona; he is also a member of Transplants (with Tim Armstrong of Rancid and Travis Barker of Blink-182), and he played on Jimmy Cliff’s 2011 EP, Sacred Fire.

The Interrupters have addressed political subjects on the band’s first two albums. The 2014 song “Take Back the Power” includes the lyrics: “What’s your plan for tomorrow? Are you a leader or will you follow? Are you a fighter or will you cower? It’s our time to take back the power.” The 2016 track “She Got Arrested” addresses the subject of domestic violence.

During a recent phone interview, Kevin Bivona said that while the band addresses political subjects, it isn’t entirely political.

“I wouldn’t put (politics) first, because we’re musicians, and we’re a band, but we’re not politicians,” Bivona said. “Some of our songs are definitely politically charged, but not all of them. I think it’s a spectrum, and I think everyone is political to a certain degree. Maybe we are more political than some bands, but in our genre of punk rock, it’s actually pretty common to have a stance, at least. But not all of our songs are based around politics or government. (We also do songs about) any general injustices, general relationships with people, and standing up for yourself. Everybody is a little political, and we’re on the spectrum.”

Bivona was a professional musician long before helping form The Interrupters and has appeared on numerous albums by other artists. He said he tries to create a healthy balance with the other projects in which he takes part.

“It kind of balances itself out,” he said. “Being that we’ve been so lucky with the touring opportunities that we’ve gotten with The Interrupters lately, it’s been my primary focus. Sometimes, it works out where I can go do a couple dates with Rancid in between Interrupters tours. There hasn’t been anything conflicting yet, knock on wood. I kind of take each thing as it comes and just try not to get bombarded. It’s something I think about, though, having that kind of a balance.”

Last summer, The Interrupters played The Warped Tour. I asked him if he felt the current tour—founded on punk rock in the mid ’90s, and now primarily appealing to fans of pop-punk, Christian punk and metal bands—would make the average punk devotee feel out of place.

“It seems that way, genre-wise, when you look at it, but getting to know the founder, Kevin Lyman, throughout the summer and watching the way the whole organization works—it is the same tour as it was in 1997,” Bivona said. “I think the music has evolved and branched out into different areas, but there definitely still is a home for punk rock. … You’ll see more punk rock on that tour this year or next year, especially with the political climate the way it is. It’s always a good time when there’s a lot of protesting happening—it’s a good time for punk to bubble up again, because it never fully goes away.

“It is the same festival as it was, but the young people’s tastes have changed, and we’re trying to bring punk back. I think part of us playing last year was trying to build a bridge between old Warped Tour and new Warped Tour. We’re a new band, but we’re also very inspired by the original punk rock and ska. Being a new band helps bridge the two together. It was actually a lot of fun to do that tour, because it still has a very DIY punk ethic, and all the bands work together, no matter if they’re metal, pop-punk or techno. We all still have to wait in the same line to get food and get a shower.”

The Interrupters are signed with Hellcat Records, a label founded by Tim Armstrong of Rancid that is an offshoot of Epitaph Records, which was founded by Bad Religion guitarist Brett Gurewitz. Bivona explained his love for the label.

“The best part for us was when we got our first pressing of our first album, and just seeing that Hellcat logo on there,” he said. “We all grew up as such big fans of that label. When the Give ’Em the Boot compilations started coming out, we wore those out back in the days of CDs, when they’d get all scratched up and you’d have to go get another one. Plus, Epitaph putting out all those Punk-O-Rama compilations—that was how we discovered music back then. I remember the first time I heard Hepcat on the first Give ’Em the Boot, and the first time I heard “Sidekick” by Rancid was on Punk-O-Rama. Being part of that legacy is the coolest thing.”

While The Interrupters are new to Coachella, Bivona is not: He played the festival with Tim Armstrong when they performed as part of Jimmy Cliff’s backing band in 2012.

“It’s a very California festival, and we’re looking forward to the whole experience of the thing,” he said. “(We’re looking forward to) playing to audience that may have never seen us before, (people) who go to that festival just to discover new music, because a lot of people buy a ticket before the lineup comes up, because they love discovering new music and being at the festival all weekend. We hope to grab some of them. We also want to check out the festival. Toots and the Maytals is performing. We want to see Dreamcar, which is the new band with the No Doubt guys and Davey Havok, so that’s also a cool experience for us.”

Published in Previews

T.S.O.L. helped define the Los Angeles punk scene after the band’s start in 1978.

However, its initial punk success was short-lived: After frontman Jack Grisham, drummer Todd Barnes and keyboardist Greg Kuehn left in 1983, T.S.O.L. (True Sounds of Liberty) reconfigured as a rock band.

After a legal battle over the name, Grisham became part of T.S.O.L. again in 1999, with Kuehn rejoining in 2005. They’ve been performing together ever since—and recently released a new album, The Trigger Complex.

T.S.O.L. played the first-ever concert that Coachella promoter Goldenvoice put on, so it’s appropriate that T.S.O.L. will be playing Coachella on Sunday, April 16 and 23.

During a recent phone interview with Grisham while he was in traffic driving home to Huntington Beach, he was an open book. Grisham’s history includes a love for drugs and alcohol, legal issues, a marriage to a 16-year-old girl in Mexico, and eventually sobriety, which he achieved in the late 1980s.

“I believe I would have been dead if I didn’t stop,” Grisham said, “not because I was a big drug-addict guy, because I really wasn’t. I’ll tell you exactly what I was: I was a high school idiot who had gotten out of control. I was hanging out with people who were like me—a mess. Everyone was drinking, snorting coke and taking pills or whatever the fuck was going on. I would say to myself, ‘I don’t really have a problem, because I don’t really shoot up. I’m not really an alcoholic, because I live at my mother’s.’”

Grisham recalled one of his early arrests.

“I was actually arrested in Palm Springs for disturbing the peace,” he said. “Luckily, they didn’t get me for impersonating an officer, which is what they originally wanted me for.

“I did little bits of time in jail, but no prison sentences—just a bunch of stupid arrests for dumb stuff. But there were a lot of people who weren’t happy with me, and I was drinking large amounts and taking pills to go with it. When you’re 24 or 25 years old, is it a recipe for disaster? Yes. Pills and booze is a bad combo.”

Grisham still believes in punk-rock ideals, even though he’s now a responsible member of society, a husband and a father.

“It’s kind of funny, because I have the same outlook now that I had back then,” Grisham said. “To me, punk rock was always this family kind of thing. My family and I were not on good terms. The punk-rock thing was this cool family thing where everyone was an idiot and out of control. A lot of it was kind of a hippie movement, too. We were inclusive. Men and women were equal; no one cared who you were into sexually, so it was really wide open, and I still think like that. I still think that you should challenge old ideals, conflict, experiment, keep an open mind and all that stuff. It hasn’t changed, but—I hate to sound like Austin Powers right now, but along with free love comes responsibility. Now, I’m just more responsible with the same ideals.”

Grisham has spoken out in the past about political issues, and was one of the 135 candidates who ran in the recall election for governor of California in 2003. Grisham said it’s hard to say whether he’s always considered himself “informed.”

“That’s a hard one. I don’t know how informed a lot of us were,” he said. “I was pretty ill-informed, saying, ‘Fuck the government!’ I had a dad who was 30 years in the Navy. Attacking what he stood for was part of being a young man growing up and turning against your father. How informed was I, really? I don’t know. Sometimes, I think we’re fighting the wrong demons at times. I don’t think people realize that some of these issues we’re dealing with, many of them are things that have been going on for thousands of years—fear, greed and these kinds of things.

“I don’t know what’s going to happen. It’s actually pretty frightening. Who isn’t scared? But you can be conservative and liberal at the same time. It might sound a little crazy, but I love helping people who have been harmed by circumstance. I’m in, and I’m 100 percent in. Those who have (been) put out by their own choice, I’m not really a big fan of. I think they should teach courses in religious tolerance in schools and start teaching tolerance and understanding. These are things we’re not teaching our children. A lot of people who believe in a higher power are basing their political decisions on those beliefs, yet we refuse to look at other people’s beliefs and understand what we’re dealing with.”

As far as Goldenvoice goes, Grisham said he’s had nothing but positive experiences with the group over the years.

“T.S.O.L. played the very first Goldenvoice show in Santa Barbara. I’m still friends with those guys,” he said. “(Goldenvoice president) Paul Tollett wanders around Coachella, and you wouldn’t even know it was him. I was out there for Desert Trip, and he was really nice, and he invited my family out. He’s wandering around in jeans and a T-shirt; all these people are there to see these bands and have no idea he’s the guy running the show. He walks up to my wife and said, ‘I still remember having to call Jack’s mom’s house,’ and rattles off my mother’s phone number. My interaction with them has been great. They’ve treated my family with respect, kindness and love, and that’s what I like about them.”

However, Grisham conceded he’s not a fan of large festivals.

“I’m not a big concert guy. For me, I’ll probably wander around, play and then go back to wherever I’m staying and go to bed,” he said. “I’ll probably hang out during the day and visit people in town. If I’m going to listen to music, I like listening to it at home. I think it’s really cool they asked us, because not a lot of bands of our type have been asked. Yeah, the Vandals and the Damned have played, but it was really nice (for them) to ask us to do it, and I’m stoked to see people and my friends. That’s what I’m looking forward to. My kids are more stoked about it than I am—not that I’m not stoked; it’s an honor, but I like being at home. I shoot photos, too, and people have to come to me, because I don’t go anywhere. I get asked to go to studios to shoot so and so, and I say, ‘No, tell so and so to get in their fucking car and come to Huntington Beach, and I’ll shoot ’em over a cup of coffee.’”

Published in Previews

Before Nirvana took the world by storm, a band from Dayton, Ohio, called Guided by Voices was creating innovative post-punk rock—what would come to be known as “alternative rock.”

Guided by Voices will finally be appearing at Coachella for the first time on Friday, April 14 and 21.

The history of Guided by Voices is a bit hard to explain. Robert Pollard founded Guided by Voices in 1983. The group, amidst varying lineups, broke up in 2004, reunited in 2010, broke up again in 2014, and reunited last year. The prolific band has produced music that one could call lo-fi, psychedelic rock, garage rock, punk rock and post-punk rock. The group has released 23 albums (not counting various “unofficial” releases), at one point putting out as many as three albums in one year.

The current lineup includes Robert Pollard (lead vocals), Doug Gillard (guitar), Bobby Bare Jr. (guitar), Mark Shue (bass) and Kevin March (drums).

During a recent phone interview with Doug Gillard, who was a member from 1997 to 2004 before rejoining the band in 2016, he said the band still calls Dayton home.

“I’m personally from Cleveland, so I still love Cleveland, even though I don’t make it back there that much, but Bob (Pollard) still lives in Dayton,” Gillard said. “That’s kind of where we’re still based. We still rehearse there, and that’s where we start every tour. We still like Dayton, but there are not a lot of venues for Guided by Voices to play, or the venues are booked.”

One of the best-known and least-lo-fi albums from Guided by Voices’ heyday is Do the Collapse, from 1999, which was produced by Ric Ocasek, guitarist of The Cars. The album received a mixed reception.

“We were a four-piece back then,” Gillard said. “We did the basic tracks, and that left Bob and I doing most of the overdubs; we came back to oversee the mixing a couple of weeks later. We even did some recording at Ric’s house, because he had a tape machine there. The rest we did at Electric Lady Studios in New York. We had a pretty fun experience at that time. I personally wasn’t down with some of the production things that were happening, but Bob sort of wanted to see where it would go. That’s the record that came out—but I personally had fun recording it.”

Amid all of the lineup changes and reunions, I asked Gillard what keeps Guided by Voices going.

“I think Bob enjoys touring, and touring with the band behind him,” he said. “He does enjoy putting out records under the name Guided by Voices, so it’s sort of like, ‘Why not just use that name all the time?’ He still records solo albums, (has) solo ventures and (has) side bands, too, but under Guided by Voices, we can do the whole repertoire and the whole history. We can play all the songs from the records that have come out, all the fan favorites—and Bob is always writing. He writes songs every day. I’d say Guided by Voices is probably the best outlet for most of the stuff he writes.”

Last year, Guided by Voices released a new album, and will be releasing yet another new album on April 7.

“That’s pretty much Bob solo under the name of Guided by Voices,” Gillard said of last year’s Please Be Honest. He recorded everything himself. … He even played the drums and was going around the studio in Dayton playing everything. We have a double album coming out in April, August by Cake. We recorded that in New York as a band, and five of the songs are songs that Bob did in Dayton by himself, one-man-band style. I added some guitar to those finished mixes. Eight of the songs are two songs each by the other band members to fill out a double album. That was a lot of fun. … It’s kind of a sprawling double album.”

Gillard said the seemingly continuous recording process doesn’t burn him out—but that touring does at times.

“I love recording. That’s probably my favorite thing to do—record and create things in the studio,” he said. “Sometimes, you get tired when you’re touring of the live shows, and we tend to play long shows. We try to take a day off in between each show, and that helps.”

Guided by Voices has been on many Coachella fans’ wish lists for many years. Gillard said he’s not sure why the band has never played the festival in the past.

“I’m always up for playing festivals,” Gillard said. “In my tenure with Guided by Voices, we’ve played quite a few. I don’t know if the band has been asked to play Coachella in the past or not, but maybe it was during a time when Bob was on a hiatus from touring. I know we’re very excited to be playing.”

Published in Previews

Since the Los Angeles-based band Chicano Batman started in 2008, the group has taken a long and interesting path to success—and after years of independent EPs and album releases, the group recently signed with ATO Records.

On the heels of new album Freedom Is Free, which dropped March 3, the group will be making its second appearance at Coachella on Saturday, April 15 and 22.

During a recent phone interview with guitarist Carlos Arévalo, he discussed the recording of Freedom Is Free.

“The album was recorded in January 2016 over the span of two weeks,” Arévalo said. “The album was recorded at the Diamond Mine studio in Long Island City, N.Y., with the producer, Leon Michels. Leon Michels is a former member of the Dap-Kings and played with Sharon Jones when he was 16 years old. He’s appeared on numerous recordings, and he was a member of the Black Keys. … We had been writing for (the album) since the summer of 2015.”

The recording process with Michels was different for the band, Arévalo said.

“There was a bit more of a direction involved,” he said. “Before, we would just record with songs we had, and we would record them the way we’d play them live. For better or worse, that’s what you hear. This time, we had a producer, and we would bounce a lot of ideas off of him. He acted as a fifth voice. Often times (before), it’d just be the four of us going democratically. So if there’s something not happening, and there are two saying, ‘Go this way,’ and two going another way, we kind of go nowhere. But it was nice having Leon say, ‘No, it should go this way.’ We respect his résumé and his musical abilities, so that made it really easy to move forward in finishing the arrangements in some of the songs. There are also backup singers; there’s flute and a lot of instrumentation on it, and we said we’d figure that out for a live setting later. We also tightened up our songwriting. We wrote more concise songs and said what we needed to say.”

The support of ATO Records is obviously beneficial, Arévalo said, but he added that he and his fellow band members are thankful to those who helped them in the past.

“Everything we’ve done up until we started working with ATO was pure self-release and completely independent,” he said. “We had the help of managers and booking agents … and all of those people before who helped us get to where we are now with a label. The label is very supportive and gives us our creative freedom, and they are going to put our music on a platform that we couldn’t put it on ourselves financially, or without those networks being in the music industry.”

Chicano Batman has played numerous times in the Coachella Valley, most recently last year in October at The Hood Bar and Pizza. There has never been a gig too big or too small for Chicano Batman over the years as the group built its fan base.

“We’re older guys. We’re not 21-year-olds who get in the van and tour the country for three months straight,” Arévalo said. “We have wives and families, and we were really mindful of how we’ve toured. We would do touring in two-week spurts. We’d hit up markets that we knew we’d do well in and places we knew there was a fan base. We’d play San Francisco in a 500-capacity room, but we’d go to Atlanta and play to a 250-capacity room, because we hadn’t put in the work yet out there. Also, we’ve been asked to play big festivals and open for big bands. Right now, the way things are looking, we’re going toward the bigger rooms. We’ve been selling out nice-size rooms along the West Coast.”

In this age of Donald Trump, Arévalo sees Chicano Batman’s multicultural fan base as a beautiful thing and hopes that it inspires people.

“The goal has always been to reach people through art and have a positive message,” he said. “That’s always been our reality and where we’re from. I think being in the music industry and coming up in it, you see that not all stages represent people who look like us. We try to change that and be the best we can be musically, and as people promoting diversity through our music. It’s beautiful that we can bring people of all cultures together. If you ever come to a Chicano Batman show, it’s a beautiful sight. There are people from all cultures and ethnicities being represented as we grow in popularity. That’s a special thing to cherish in these divisive times and people drawing lines in the sand.”

The band last year took part in an ad campaign for which it recorded a cover of Woody Guthrie’s “This Land Is Your Land.”

“During the summer of last year, Johnnie Walker approached us about being part of their ad campaign called ‘Keep Walking America,’” Arévalo said. “The idea was to promote and celebrate diversity, which has always been the M.O. of this group, obviously. They approached us, and we thought the message was a strong one, and they were the ones who suggested we record Woody Guthrie’s ‘This Land Is Your Land.’ This happened when Trump was running for president. We were really starting to see the ugliness of people identifying other people by race and trying to differentiate themselves from other people. We thought it was a good message, and the song is a protest song, so it speaks to those ideals about this country, and we felt like it’s a big statement for us to be part of something like that. People who look like us aren’t really represented in commercials and movies, and we thought it would be an important campaign to take part in.”

After its 2015 Coachella debut, Chicano Batman is hoping to make a bigger impact this year.

“We’re hoping we get a better time slot this time,” Arévalo said. “Last time, we played at 1 in the afternoon, and we were hung over. Aside from that, we’re really excited to bring this new production to fruition. We’re also touring with backup singers to sing on many of the new album tracks.”

Arévalo added that the band is forever thankful to the Coachella Valley for support.

“We have a lot of love for the Coachella Valley. We always make it a point to go out there and play whenever we can,” he said. “The Coachella Valley is one of those places that gave us chances when other places weren’t giving us chances. We’re not going to forget the places that gave us chances when we’re playing the Fillmore. People always come up to us and tell us how meaningful it is that we played there, and we’re always humbled by that.”

Published in Previews

LOS ANGELES (Reuters)—Lady Gaga will step in for Beyonce at this year’s Coachella music festival after the R&B singer, who is pregnant with twins, dropped out of her headlining slot due to doctor’s orders.

Gaga, 30, made the announcement late Tuesday, Feb. 28, on her social media pages with an image of the three-day lineup at the festival and her name at the top of the second day’s schedule, accompanied by the caption, “Let’s party in the desert!”

Beyonce, 35, was due to headline the annual Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival in Indio on April 15 and April 22. She pulled out last week, saying in a statement that she was “following the advice of her doctors to keep a less rigorous schedule in the coming months.”

Gaga’s Coachella headlining slot follows her performance at February’s Super Bowl, where she sang, danced and soared over the stage suspended on cables, delivering a flawless choreographed medley of her hits that include “Poker Face” and “Born This Way.”

The singer is also due to kick off her world tour in support of her latest album, last year’s Joanne, in August.

Coachella is the first major U.S. festival of the summer live music scene and hosts two consecutive weekends of the same lineup.

Beyonce and her rapper husband Jay Z, who have a 5year-old daughter, Blue Ivy, have not said when the twins are due. The singer said she’ll headline Coachella next year.

(Reporting by Piya Sinha-Roy; Editing by David Gregorio)

This morning’s announcement of the Coachella 2017 lineup was, per usual, met with a wide variety of reactions.

While I was not wildly impressed by the lineup (which you can see below), the online reviews have been largely positive. Esquire even went so far as to call the slate of performers—featuring headliners Radiohead, Beyoncé and Kendrick Lamar—“the festival’s best lineup in years.”

And … Hans Zimmer? The legendary film composer? He’s performing. Wow.

However, one band has received a lot of criticism—Radiohead. And that, frankly, is just not right.

When this band from Abingdon, Oxfordshire, England released its first album, Pablo Honey, in 1993, success in England came quickly, followed by popularity in the rest of the world, including America. The song “Creep” became an international hit, while “Stop Whispering” made the charts in the United States. Radiohead’s modest, “alternative” sound came at the perfect time in terms of rock-music evolution, and by the time new millennium started, Radiohead was one of the biggest bands in the world.

Now more than a decade and a half into the 2000s, Radiohead is still wildly popular—yet some have started to question the validity of their music, even labeling it as “boring.”

These criticisms are off-base. Radiohead, after all, has sold 30 million records while consistently selling out arenas. Yes, Radiohead still matters—and here are five reasons why.

1. Radiohead has a vital role in Coachella’s history.

Radiohead first performed at Coachella in 2004. At the time, the band was reveling in the release of top-selling albums OK Computer (1997; considered by some to be one of the best albums of all time), Kid A (2000), Amnesiac (2001) and Hail to the Thief (2003). In other words, in 2004, Radiohead was huge—while Coachella was still struggling. Radiohead, along with a reunited Pixies, and The Cure, helped Coachella sell out of passes for the first time. Coachella was considered an indie festival at the time, and Radiohead was a game-changer. Radiohead returned to Coachella in 2012 and was very well-received by attendees and the music press.

2. Radiohead’s lyrics are fascinating.

All of Radiohead’s albums include a lot of fascinating lyrical content. “Creep” is a ballad about a girl who frontman Thom Yorke was fascinated with; she actually showed up at one of the band’s gigs. The first song I ever heard by Radiohead was “Fake Plastic Trees” (1995). Amusing title aside, it was written by Yorke, while under stress from Capitol Records, as a follow-up single to “Creep,” and was inspired by a drunken night in Canary Wharf, a business district in East London that has a lot of … fake plastic trees. Believe it or not, plastic trees are a controversial subject, going back to an early 1970s essay written by Martin H. Krieger titled “What’s Wrong With Plastic Trees?” Meanwhile, Hail to the Thief was memorable because of the political climate at the time—the record title was a nod to George W. Bush’s presidency. Yorke penned the track “2 + 2 = 5” as a reference to George Orwell’s 1984.

3. Radiohead does a lot musically.

Radiohead’s first three albums have a rock sound—although other elements are included. Then came Kid A in 2000—showing off a Radiohead sound that had evolved to include more specific elements of classical music and electronic music. Thom Yorke told Chuck Klosterman during an interview in 2003, “Do people really think I like straight-ahead rock? There's an irony in that, because I’ve always been more interested in making sounds, which is why I gravitate towards Kid A material.” The way in which Radiohead layers its music is, simply put, fascinating.

4. Radiohead’s live performances are awesome.

Beyond the great music, Radiohead’s visuals and lighting during live performances is dazzling. At Coachella in 2012, Radiohead had different-sized video screens hanging above the stage, an LED screen behind the band, and a large video panel at the top of the stage that showed all five members at once. And the band’s still got it: Reviews of Radiohead’s performance at Lollapalooza in Chicago last summer were positive across the board.

5. Radiohead’s new album was one of the best of 2016.

To reiterate: Radiohead’s still got it.

A Moon Shaped Pool, released May 8 of last year, is Radiohead’s ninth album, and it shows the band is creatively pushing the bar higher and higher. The release has received near-universal acclaim while nabbing two Grammy nominations—for Best Alternative Music Album and Best Rock Song (“Burn the Witch”).

If you have never seen Radiohead before, make sure you don’t miss them at Coachella—no matter the preconceived notions you may have about the band. A lot of Coachella 2017 attendees were not even born yet when Pablo Honey hit record stories back in 1993—and how many other bands from that era are still going as strongly today?

Indio is the Coachella Valley’s largest city—and faces complex challenges due to the fact that it’s the home of Coachella, Stagecoach and Desert Trip.

In this year’s city election, seven people are running for two seats on the Indio City Council: Incumbents Glenn Miller and Lupe Ramos Watson, and challengers Joan Dzuro, Gina Chapa, Sam Torres, Jackie Lopez and Noe Gutierrez.

Joan Dzuro (right), a retired human resources consultant, cited a lack of both redevelopment funds and a concise plan for redevelopment as problems in Indio, due in large part to the state of California dissolving all redevelopment agencies back in 2012.

“One of the challenges that we have is the loss of the redevelopment funds,” Dzuro said. “… When those funds were removed by Sacramento, it became harder to find funding for that. I’m very encouraged by the hiring of (the city’s new director of economic development), Carl Morgan, because he’s able to come up with plans to talk to investors and businesses, and to try to work on options for some of that funding. You always need more funds when you have a fast-growing city. Public safety needs to be able to keep up with that, and it costs money.”

Dzuro said that her 35 years in corporate human resources give her much-needed experience.

“I’ve dealt with corporations from the business side and the employee side,” she said. “I think that’s the strength I can bring to the council, and bring in jobs and create businesses for the city, and have those businesses contribute new marketable skills to our unemployed and to the younger people graduating from college.”

Gina Chapa, a community organizer who worked for Congressman Raul Ruiz, said the lack of diverse commerce is a big issue.

“We’re struggling a lot with bringing in new businesses, supporting businesses, and actually having a thriving commercial area,” she said. “Also, I see that there’s a huge disparity between different populations in Indio. In order to feel like a complete city, we need to find a way to build bridges between the different communities in Indio. I feel that there’s a lack of ownership or participation. There’s a large population of disaffected or apathetic residents who feel disconnected to their local government.”

Chapa (right) said her roots are in Indio. “I’m a longtime community organizer and community resident. I was born in Indio and went to school in Indio. I’m raising my son in Indio, and I’m connected to various communities in Indio.”

Sam Torres, a former city councilman, said Indio’s slow economic recovery has caused problems.

“We’re starting to see some signs of (recovery in) the last few years, but we haven’t seen the robust economy we thought we were going to have,” he said. “I think that there’s another issue, and that’s the fact we’re starting to see two Indios. One is the north side and the far south side along the polo fields. The south side gets a lot of attention and is a new and dynamic community. But we’ve been leaving out the communities that have always been here. The residents in these communities are the ones who were building this economy. If you look in those neighborhoods, you can see the decay.”

Why should Indio voters put Torres back on the City Council, two years after he lost a re-election bid?

“I know the job. Now I really know this city,” he said. “I tell the truth and tell it like it is: ‘This is the problem, and this is what it takes to fix it.’ I do not bow to special interests, because the city residents elect me, and I don’t have a scheme to make money off this city.”

Jackie Lopez (right), who works as the district director for Assemblymember Eduardo Garcia, said Indio’s largest challenge involves commerce.

“The No. 1 issue is places to shop,” Lopez said. “People spend their money outside of Indio. One of my main goals is better economic development. There are a lot of business owners struggling to make it. On the north side of Indio, we have a village market that could be a grocery store that’s sitting there. There are people who live across the street looking for places to shop that are walkable, and they’re getting to the point where they’re relying on their children and public transportation. Even though there are places to shop on the other side of the overpass, it’s too far for them. … I also feel that hotels are another concern with these festivals in our city; a lot of our tourists are staying outside of the area.”

Lopez said her work experience makes her a good fit for the City Council.

“I’m a lifelong resident here and have eight years working for the state Legislature,” she said. “I know how to get our money back from the state. I have worked on numerous pieces of legislation at the state level, (and worked) with our congressman to leverage funds for victims of the Salton Sea.” 

Noe Gutierrez—a behavioral health specialist, writer for CV Weekly and musician—said the city has not focused enough on small business.

“Downtown Indio hasn’t flourished like it should have,” he said. “I think smart growth is what we need—focusing on small-business owners and helping people get set up and started, as well as following them through. We all know the numbers of small businesses and when they open. Generally, they close within three years. We need to develop a plan we can follow.”

Gutierrez (right) said his experience in understanding people will serve him on the City Council.

“I grew up in Indio, and went to school in Indio, and I understand the backstreets, the different neighborhoods, the different types of people who live in those neighborhoods, and I understand their perception of things,” he said. “I have a huge amount of empathy given my background working as a social worker. My job is to put myself in other people’s shoes, so I feel I do a pretty good job doing that. … One thing I’m known for is gathering people together, getting them connected and establishing long-term relationships that are beneficial.”

The incumbents have had front-line experience dealing with Indio’s economic challenges in recent years. Glenn Miller said that while some newer areas of Indio—closer to Interstate 10—are fairly prosperous, the city’s downtown is suffering.

“Some of our older parts are taking a toll from the economic downturn,” he said. “It’s getting the actual funding availability, not only from the city of Indio, but also from our business community to invest into some of the areas that have been hit hardest due to the economic downturn, such as our downtown area.”

Miller, who has been on the council since 2008, has seen the city deal with hard financial times.

“When I first came on to the council, we had a structural $13 million deficit,” he said. “We burned through $35 million in reserves. Now we have a structurally balanced budget with over a half-million dollars in reserves, so financially, it is economically sound. But when you start talking about where you want the city to go when listening to our residents, one of the things they ask for is different kinds of shopping and business opportunities, education and investing in infrastructure.”

Miller said he should be re-elected because of his dedication to the city and the fact that he spends most of his free time working for a better Indio.

“I’m the most active and involved council member out of all the council members,” he said. “I’m very much engaged and spend all my free time working with our businesses, nonprofits and residents on what’s important to them.

“Indio will grow not only locally, but regionally. Not everyone who lives in Indio works in Indio. So the stronger the Coachella Valley is as a whole, and the more relationships we can build with College of the Desert and with our school district, it will be an advantage to the city of Indio, and I’m able to engage in those relationships.”

Councilmember Lupe Ramos Watson (right) said she’s concerned that Indio is losing out on sales-tax revenue.

“Our first and biggest challenge is to recapture some of the sales tax that is leaking out to other cities,” Watson said. “Several years ago, we conducted an economic-strategy analysis to figure out how much of our disposable income is being spent within the city boundaries to produce sales tax revenue, and how much was leaking out to other cities. We figured out that more than 50 percent of our potential sales tax revenue is leaking to other cities.”

Watson said she deserves to remain on the council due to the steps that she and her colleagues have taken regarding economic development.

“We just hired an economic development director a couple of months ago,” she said. “Because of the strategy we put together a couple of months ago, we have a plan for the downtown area that we’re completing to make sure the businesses that come into that area not only revitalize the downtown area, but add sales tax to our revenue and augment the opportunities as the ‘City of Festivals.’ With my background in planning in addition to development, I believe I’m a great asset to the city of Indio to help unfold these projects.”

We asked each of the candidates: What is the real identity of Indio?

“I believe Indio’s biggest attraction is that we’re a family-oriented city,” Dzuro said. “We emphasize our parks, the teen center and the Boys and Girls Club of America. We work together as a community with our festivals. The Tamale Festival and the Date Festival are family events. We really try to bring in the families to our community, and I think that’s what we emphasize more than anything.”

Chapa said that she feels the city government is not properly engaging with the older parts of the city.

“We know what it’s all called: ‘The City of Festivals,’” Chapa said. “That’s what it’s marketed as. It … doesn’t have just one identity. We know people understand Indio from the outside because of Coachella and the large snowbird community. As for the identity that it once had, there are many 40-plus-year residents living here who aren’t being included in the new face of Indio and the ‘City of Festivals.’ The identity is something we need to work on as a city, and (we need to) reach out to the community to build an identity so the people can feel like they’re part of the city, and that we can build our city together.”

Torres said Indio is not reaping the economic benefits it should be.

“The city of Indio is the ‘City of Festivals,’ but we used to be the second seat of the county, and we’re now in the backseat to Palm Springs,” Torres (right) said. “Any of the big events they have here, even at the casinos, they call it ‘Greater Palm Springs.’ We provide the neighbors and facilities, but the cash registers are ringing in the west valley. The local leaders have allowed that to happen and don’t have a plan to bring that identity back to Indio, and that’s where we made a huge mistake. It’s called the ‘’City of Festivals,’ but we’re really the ‘Greater Palm Springs Chamber of Commerce Backseaters.’”

Lopez said she wants Indio to once again be considered the hub of the Coachella Valley.

“We have so much potential, and we’re still growing,” she said. “On the other side of the freeway, I just found out we’re getting a Sonic and some other new places to shop and eat. The hope is to make sure we have a council member who will reinvest back into our community. We do pay taxes, and we’d like to see some of that money come back in infrastructure or attracting new places to shop and eat in downtown Indio—becoming the hub of the valley again.”

Gutierrez also said the city does not capitalize enough on the ‘City of Festivals’ label.

“There are some blinders on us,” he said. “We’re known for Coachella, but we don’t really expand on that. We’re just the site for Coachella. … We can’t rely on one-time events where people come, hang out and then leave, and probably never come back. We need a continuous inclusion of all age groups, ethnicities and everything.”

As for the identity of Indio, Miller (right) feels it has a lot to offer culturally.

“It’s the ‘City of Festivals’ and the city of culture. The city also has a bright future,” he said. “I think people see that in our rich history and being the largest city, but … multiple art developments and art pieces are going up throughout the city by world renowned artists who want to be part of the city of Indio and its culture.”

Watson said that she feels the city’s identity as the “City of Festivals” ties everything together.

“We’ve always celebrated our culture through the festivals,” she said. “It’s a community of celebration; Indio is full of hard-working individuals who work through our seasons to fulfill every need of their families, and when it’s time to celebrate, it’s done through our festivals. That is … a hard working community that understands that we need to work hard and work together to build a community that meets our needs.”

Published in Politics