CVIndependent

Fri11242017

Last updateWed, 27 Sep 2017 1pm

LOS ANGELES (Reuters)—California legislators have raised fines for traffic infractions to some of the highest in the United States to generate revenue—and the poor are bearing an unfair burden, losing cars and jobs because they cannot pay them, civil rights activists said last week.

The Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights of the San Francisco Bay Area said in a new report that the $490 fine for a red-light ticket in California is three times the national average. The cost is even higher if motorists want to attend traffic school in lieu of a conviction or are late paying.

“Our state is raising money off the backs of California families to balance the budget for special projects, and it’s using traffic tickets as a revenue generator instead of to protect safety, instead of to do justice,” said Elisa Della-Piana, the group’s legal director.

The report comes as lawmakers in some states and local jurisdictions have begun to recognize the implications of high traffic fines on the poor and unemployed, especially in minority communities.

Failure to pay a fine on time can lead to a motorist to lose one’s driver license and car, suffer further financial problems—and even wind up in jail.

“Studies show 78 percent of Californians drive to work, and a very high percentage need to have a license to have a job,” Della-Piana said. “If you can’t afford to pay $500 this month for a traffic ticket, that’s also saying to many families, ‘You lose your household income.’”

California lawmakers have begun to take baby steps to address the problem, Della-Piana said, with Gov. Jerry Brown lately vetoing new attempts by state legislators to raise fines or tack on new fees to traffic tickets, as they grapple with deep budget deficits brought on in part by mushrooming public employee pension obligations.

Brown, a Democrat, has also said in his latest budget proposal that the state should not be suspending driver’s licenses for failure to pay a ticket.

State Sen. Bob Hertzberg, a Democrat from Los Angeles, has introduced legislation that would reduce fines based on a motorist’s ability to pay.

Della-Piana said California should next stop arresting motorists who cannot afford to pay their tickets. Black people are statistically more likely to be jailed for such offenses, according to the report.

(Reporting by Dan Whitcomb; editing by Cynthia Osterman)

Published in Local Issues

I have curated a mix this month that should prime you for the upcoming summer season!

I wanted to turn up the heat and bring you tracks that can get anyone moving. I took some inspiration from the deeper side of dance, so this playlist can take you from the pool to the club—and back!

I recently decided to retire All Night Shoes and perform under my “real” name, and with that, my style has evolved as well. In any case, you may hear some familiar sounds here—maybe you can pick them out!

I hope you enjoy this exclusive mix. Enjoy these pre-hot season sounds!

  • Redlight, “Gold Teeth” (TRU Concept Remix)
  • Mark Ronson featuring Bruno Mars, “Uptown Funk” (Chris Lake Edit)
  • Breach, “Let’s Get Hot”
  • Anna Lunoe, “Breathe” (Cosmo’s Midnight Remix)
  • Galantis, “Runaway (U & I)” (East and Young Remix)
  • Tough Love, “So Freakin’ Tight”
  • Kolombo, “Ur the Finest”
  • SNBRN featuring Kaleena Zanders, “California” (Chris Lake and Matroda Remix)
  • Kaskade, “Never Sleep Alone”
  • Bee's Knees featuring Marty Rod, “Rumored to Be Real”
  • Breach, “Jack” (Alex Harrington Remix)

This month, I am bringing you my “New Palm Springs: Vol. 2” mix—part two of a four-part series.

The goal of each mix is to reflect the valley in which we live (or the place you love to visit, if you don’t live here). The Coachella Valley has a unique collection of different cultures that come together and commingle.

As a musician and DJ, I want to create experiences that evoke emotion. This second mix builds on that ideal—I want to give you soundtracks you can keep in your pocket, so to speak. In it, I’ve included my latest remix, “One in Three,” from Name One and Maxxi Soundsystem.

This mix features a deeper, sexier collection of tracks. I wanted this mix to reflect the nightlife in our valley—but from a different angle. Think of it as offering a poolside meets nightclub vibe.

Not everyone follows a crowd; some people want to experience the unfamiliar and expand their usual listening habits. The music I find is from all over the world—including a lot of music made right here in the Palm Springs area. I love finding a balance between local inspiration and international inspiration.

Enjoy this month’s mix below!

  • Moon Boots, “Bills to Pay”
  • Rose, “No Good” (Toniia and Santiago Remix)
  • Tove Lo, “Not on Drugs” (The Knocks Remix)
  • Name One and Maxxi Soundsystem, “One in Three” (All Night Shoes Remix)
  • Disciples, “They Don’t Know”
  • Joshua Heath, “Just Funk Me Already”
  • TRU Concept vs. Beverley Knight, “Keep the Fire Burning”
  • Fabienne, “Sunstroke” (Endor Remix)
  • Me and My Toothbrush, “Show Me”
  • Redlight x Tinashe, “Pretend”
  • T. Williams and MJ Cole, “Privilege”
  • Full Crate, “Hurt Your Back”