CVIndependent

Fri11242017

Last updateWed, 27 Sep 2017 1pm

Local DJ Alex Harrington has made a name for himself as one of the Coachella Valley’s most in-demand DJs—but he’s also been spending a lot of time on the production side, creating his own house music.

It appears that hard work is starting to pay off. He recently released a new EP, and has yet more new tracks in the works.

During a recent interview in Palm Springs, Harrington—a former Independent contributor—discussed his recent goings-on.

“I’ve been trying to focus on my production work, doing remixes, putting out EPs of originals, and also keeping up a presence with live gigs,” Harrington said. “As before, there was exploration involved. Now, I know the ropes and what I can do with them.”

After doing some work with nu-disco and tropical styles, Harrington said he’s currently focusing on house music. Harrington added that stepping up his production game has helped him grow as a DJ.

“When I changed from All Night Shoes to Alex Harrington, that was a big decision to dedicate myself more to house versus what I called myself before, ‘indie dance music,’” he said. “It was a mix. I think that when I changed over to Alex Harrington, which is my real name, I decided to focus more on my production. Instead of (my songs) being 3 to 4 minutes long, structured like a radio song, now they’re more made for clubs. That became my focus, and I think that my production work evolved, because the target changed. Before, I’d put it on the Internet. … Now, a lot of this is mostly for clubs and for people into this sound.”

Harrington has DJ’d beach houses in Malibu and clubs in Los Angeles, and is regularly performing locally at venues including the Saguaro and the Avalon.

“What I do is a little different, and it’s very similar to what an indie rock band does,” Harrington explained. “You play those small gigs; you build up; and last year, I had the chance to go out to Los Angeles a lot. Even if it’s an unpaid gig, I’ll head out there sometimes to play. We’re in a bubble out here, and we’re still evolving. I’m grateful for places like the Saguaro and the Avalon. I’d describe it like ‘Franken-gigging,’ because you patch together the good ones moneywise, and try to make it all look good as best you can, if you can.”

Harrington explained what he does to win over a crowd.

“I try to bring a stage presence,” he said. “Some DJs rely on a song selection and play what the crowd wants to hear. There are people who are really good at that and know what to play. For me, that wasn’t natural, and I wanted to do something different and engage the crowd. I find it more challenging, because it’s like a DJ trying to be a band. People walk in and already have a stigma of, ‘Oh, he’s pressing buttons.’ I passionately try to think of what songs to mix, and a lot of it is similar to what bands do. I use a four-count on a lot of songs and bring in another track; it’s about matching beats, and it’s not about pressing buttons. When the crowd engages, it’s magical, but there’s a stigma (about being a DJ), and you have to overcome it by not being obnoxious.

“I’m also not going to put on a helmet or anything like that,” he continued with a laugh. “To each their own, but I’d get too hot in a helmet.”

Has the term “EDM” died with the rise of house music?

“You and I probably remember house music in its infancy in the ’80s and ’90s when it was still raw and very powerful,” Harrington said. “Now that it’s popular, you hear the term ‘house’ a lot, and it’s so broad. I have tried to avoid … labeling, but you kind of have to at the end to give people an idea of what it is you’re doing. It’s a positive thing, and I think that’s why it’s exploding and why it’s here to stay—it’s so broad.

“The term ‘EDM’ was created because they tried to make dance music corporate, and EDM was a tagline. I think that house music is different. People who say ‘house music’ either love it or hate it. But people should do themselves a service and step outside the box. … When you walk into the café, and there’s a guy playing guitar or a girl singing, you don’t know who they are, but you think, ‘This is good,’ and you’re engaged by it. That’s what I’m trying to do with my music.”

While Harrington loves hip-hop and has remixed 50 Cent and Azealia Banks in the past, he is currently listening to a wide variety of music.

“A lot of the stuff I’m listening to right now is, of course, house, like Sonny Fodera,” he said. “A friend of mine, Husky, who is from Australia, makes a lot of great music in that scene there. I’m also listening to Fatboy Slim, who’s making kind of a comeback. He’s a perfect example of someone doing what I love. He’s put out some great tracks recently. I’m also listening to GoldLink, who is a rapper.”

Harrington has more new music to come.

“I have another EP coming out on April 5,” he said. “In May, I have a single coming out on Nylo Music, which is based out of New York and Europe. It’s kind of nice this year, because instead of me releasing my own music, I’m having labels come to me. There will also be a lot of remixes in between.”

For more information, visit www.alexharrington.co.

Local DJ Alex Harrington had a big year in 2015.

He played at the Dome at the Coachella campground. He returned to ever-growing summer pool-dance party Splash House. He played some out-of-town shows—including an appearance with Vanilla Ace.

The longtime Independent contributor is starting off 2016 with a bang, too: He’s releasing a new EP, Tru Groove; is starting a record label; and is beginning a residency at the soon-to-open WTF and Buzz Bar, in the old Dink’s location in Palm Springs.

During a recent interview, Harrington talked about his new EP.

“The new EP is three tracks, and the inspiration behind it is UK garage music,” Harrington said. “A lot of the old-school UK garage music, I got into it, but I wanted to give it a current touch. Everybody knows I like disco music, so what I did was make an album where the beat is garage music; the bass and the piano is disco music; and it’s all arranged like house music.”

Harrington explained the appeal of UK garage music.

“Since the ’90s, probably before that, it’s been popular in the UK,” he said. “We’d probably call it ‘main room’ or ‘progressive.’ A lot of popular artists would get on these garage tracks. Really, they are normal beats and normal music, and they speed it up. A normal house song is 120 beats per minute. A garage track is 133—so what you have is this beat that’s very frantic, but you have people singing R&B, rap and pop vocals. There are a lot of garage hits that we’ve probably heard—we heard a lot of it in the early 2000s, but … by the time we find a label for it, it’s over. But it’s very popular in the UK.”

Harrington has made what’s been referred to as “nu-disco” and “tropical house” music in the past. However, Harrington’s interests have evolved.

“It’s actually more personal now. I’m very selfish when it comes to my music and inspired by my environment. That’s why the valley is so important to me: I get inspiration from my surroundings and culture around me,” he said. “I don’t sit there and say, ‘I want to make a house track,’ or, ‘I want to make a rap track.’ It’s more of what I’m into and what I’m feeling. That’s why it’s changed so much—I’ve gotten into different things. This record signifies a change because it has all those elements together. I’m not trying to speak outside of myself here, but it has my signature sound, which I’ve never had before.”

Harrington began his DJ career performing under the name All Night Shoes. However, he went back to his real name last year.

“I feel it was a really good choice,” he said. “Having a moniker is cool for certain people, especially when you have an inspiration of something image-related. For me, the inspiration has always been more internal. It’s my job to create something, and I felt with All Night Shoes, I catered more to the name. Now I get to do what I want, and I think that’s what helped me own it.”

The upcoming residency at the new WTF and Buzz Bar is exciting for Harrington, he said. The venue was slated to open around the first of the year, but has faced delays due to power issues.

“I’ve always had a love-hate relationship with venues, because a good venue needs to be in place in order to be successful, and the venues in the desert have a hard time in trying to get people in the venues,” he said. “A lot of venues don’t care about their talent. I think for me, this new place called WTF represents a change, because the owners are very interested in the guests and doing something different. It’s not just opening the doors, selling liquor and selling food. … It’s like Los Angeles and London meet Palm Springs.”

One of the venues with which Harrington has had an association is the now-closed Hacienda Cantina and Beach Club. The venue has been shrouded in controversy since before it opened, and rumors have been going around the music community regarding unpaid bills and unmet commitments.

“They haven’t paid a lot of us out, and I’m not going to get into specifics, but it was a sudden and out-of-nowhere thing, and even to this day, we don’t have a true explanation,” Harrington said about the closure. “It got confusing, and it’s sad. The space is most likely going to go to waste.”

What’s next for Harrington?

“I just started a label called Daiquiri Hawk. We’re primarily a YouTube channel that uploads songs and shares music,” he said. “We also do releases, and this EP will be the first thing. I poured a lot of effort into the EP, and I worked with Reid Horton, who is a friend of mine out of Orange County. I’m really recognizing that the scene out here for DJs is here today, gone tomorrow, so I need to have a backup plan. I just see myself continuing the trend of this EP and getting a greater reach as far as an audience goes. The people in the valley deserve something different, and I hope I can bring that to them through my music.”

For more information, visit www.alexharrington.co.

I wish I could bring you a mix this month … but I can’t.

Circumstances have forced me to make a few hard decisions. Most notably: The website on which we’ve been hosting our mixes, SoundCloud, has suddenly made it very difficult to post anything related to a music mix. Here’s what happened: Some major record labels recently signed with Soundcloud, and in the aftermath, Soundcloud has rocked the DJ/mixing world by pulling all sorts of stuff offline, and issuing a lot of copyright notices.

Let me clear: The labels have the right to do this. But that doesn’t necessarily make it right. Artists like me are seeing our mixes being removed, even though we are giving all artists proper credit, and not selling any of this music.

There is not another viable service to use to host mixes at this point; many of my colleagues and I have been shocked to see this happen. As a result, I have to change a few projects around—including this monthly mix/column.

I’ll still contribute to the Independent when possible, and will always be working on new things. Who knows what the future will bring? Keep up and in touch at www.alexharrington.co, and thanks, as always, for all your support.

I have curated a mix this month that should prime you for the upcoming summer season!

I wanted to turn up the heat and bring you tracks that can get anyone moving. I took some inspiration from the deeper side of dance, so this playlist can take you from the pool to the club—and back!

I recently decided to retire All Night Shoes and perform under my “real” name, and with that, my style has evolved as well. In any case, you may hear some familiar sounds here—maybe you can pick them out!

I hope you enjoy this exclusive mix. Enjoy these pre-hot season sounds!

  • Redlight, “Gold Teeth” (TRU Concept Remix)
  • Mark Ronson featuring Bruno Mars, “Uptown Funk” (Chris Lake Edit)
  • Breach, “Let’s Get Hot”
  • Anna Lunoe, “Breathe” (Cosmo’s Midnight Remix)
  • Galantis, “Runaway (U & I)” (East and Young Remix)
  • Tough Love, “So Freakin’ Tight”
  • Kolombo, “Ur the Finest”
  • SNBRN featuring Kaleena Zanders, “California” (Chris Lake and Matroda Remix)
  • Kaskade, “Never Sleep Alone”
  • Bee's Knees featuring Marty Rod, “Rumored to Be Real”
  • Breach, “Jack” (Alex Harrington Remix)

FRESH Sessions this month features a fantastic guest artist: Orange County-based tastemaker Death House of Love, aka Reid Horton.

Reid is not only a DJ; he also plays in a band called VIBES.

I had a chance to ask him a few questions about his own tastes in music, and what kind of sounds come to mind when he thinks of the Coachella Valley.

Learn more at www.facebook.com/deathhouseoflove and soundcloud.com/deathhouseoflove, and scroll down to play this month's mix!

How would you describe your sound? What resources do you use to obtain your tracks?

My “sound” is somewhere between disco, Chicago house and indie rock. I grew up listening to fusion jazz greats like Chick Corea, John McLoughlin and Jaco Pastorius. My sound has evolved from more of a rock/jazz/blues background, and I played in punk-rock bands growing up. I’m not a huge fan of labels, so if you like to groove, I think you’ll like my music.

As far as finding new music, I used to write a blog called “Reid’s Wild World,” and thankfully still have a lot of connections from that. I am also on SoundCloud every day, looking for new music. No sleep for the groovy.

How long have you been playing music?

I’ve been playing music since I was 12 years old. I was really into Bad Religion at the time. I asked my mom for a guitar and instantly fell in love with the creative process of music. I’ve played in bands since I was 15, and have always loved the idea of playing live music for people, which is why I think DJing came so quickly to me. I used to make mix tapes (on actual cassettes), ever since I was in middle school, and I saw DJing as natural extension of my own creativity. I am also a member of a band called VIBES. Being able to play “disco” music live is such an incredible feeling, and lets me get my “live music itch” scratched

What record/track is currently inspiring you?

I am really digging the new Cherokee EP (Teenage Fantasy) that was just released on Roche Musique. It’s really atmospheric and layered, with a strong sense of pop delivery—a nice divergence from the pack of straightforward indie/disco/dance. As far as songs I’m playing in my sets, “Number 1 Gurrrl” by Wax Motif is a dance-floor burner that I love throwing on, as well as my dude and fellow VIBES member Templeton’s new tune, “Better Represent.” On a personal note, our new VIBES material is coming really well, and I think it’s easily the best music we’ve written.

When you think of Palm Springs and the Coachella Valley, what kind of sound/genre of music would you select for a weekend drive?

I envision the long, burning orange sunsets and the way the temperature changes at that time of the day to create an energy shift that is hard to feel anywhere else in the world. I really enjoy the open, creative and slightly-off-center viewpoint that comes along with traveling (or living) in the valley, and I am always partial to a weekend out of Orange County. As far as a soundtrack, I think the new Cherokee EP I mentioned earlier would be perfect, or something along the lines of Classixx album, Hanging Gardens, which I think is easily one of the best records in the last 10 years.

The track list:

  • Casino Gold, “1981”
  • MNEK, “The Rhythm” (Tontario remix)
  • Matvey Emerson featuring Gosha, “All I Want Is You”
  • Years and Years, “Desire” (Rainer and Grimm Remix)
  • Jerry Folk featuring BB Diamond, “So Long”
  • Wax Motif, “Number 1 Gurrrl”
  • Tom Bull, “Not Like Me”
  • Mocki, “Weekend”
  • Wild Cub, “Thunder Clatter” (Bit Funk Remix)
  • Durante, “Full Moon”
  • Ariana Grande featuring Iggy Azalea, “Problem” (TKDJs Remix)
  • Mariah Carey, “Emotions” (Christofi remix)
  • Bakermat, “Teach Me” (MK Remix) 

The Purple Room Restaurant and Stage is known for its residencies featuring acts such as the Gand Band and The Judy Show—but the venue hasn’t been particularly well-known as a place to see edgier, younger talent.

However, that is beginning to change, thanks to a new series of programming called Purple Room After Dark. The series features local and visiting acts in shows that start at 11 p.m. on Friday and Saturday nights.

Handling the booking for Purple Room After Dark is Alex Callego, who has worked with the Ace Hotel and Swim Club, as well as Bar. He also handles the Palm Springs Comic-Con and various other local events.

“I was approached by Tony Marchese, and by Dean McFarlane, who I used to work with over at the Ace Hotel,” Callego explained. “When Dean moved over to Purple Room, I said, ‘Hey, maybe you can get me in there. I’d love to try to do some entertainment over there.’

“It took about a year. Tony contacted me and basically wanted to have a meeting. We sat down, and I gave them a proposal, and we are launching our first shows at the end of February. This is the first time I’ve been able to actually be creative with what I’m doing—and there’s a lot of stuff I’m really excited to do.”

Local acts slated to play at the Purple Room in February include Waxy (Friday, Feb. 20), DJ Aimlo (Saturday, Feb. 21 and 28), CIVX (Friday, Feb. 27) and Independent resident DJ All Night Shoes (Saturday, Feb. 28).

Callego said he has big plans for March.

“I have Organic Junk Fude on Friday, March 6, with the Yip-Yops. Organic Junk Fude is a band that was around in the early 2000s and sort of had a cult following. They were this punk band that were kind of like GWAR, and also did hip-hop. It was a really strange stage show—and I was actually in the band for a bit. They were gone for a few years. They all have kids, and now they’re back and writing new music.” (See The Lucky 13 for more on Organic Junk Fude.)

Callego also isn’t afraid to go beyond musical acts for Purple Room After Dark.

“Another thing I have that I’m excited about is a stand-up comedy show on Friday, March 20, with Allen Strickland Williams, Eric Dadourian and Solomon Georgio. Allen Strickland Williams is part of a sketch group called Women; they’re getting a lot of attention and just got picked up by IFC.com. … All of them individually in Women are really talented and do different things. Solomon Georgio was just on Conan, and he did a lot of awesome comedy writing. Eric Dadourian was written up somewhere as part of the 100 Best Comics in Los Angeles.”

The band Roses is scheduled to appear on Saturday, March 21. It features members of the late, lamented group Abe Vigoda.

“Abe Vigoda played Coachella, but they are now defunct,” Callego explained. “Roses just did a mini-tour and played in New York. They also part of the scene that plays at The Smell in L.A. I’m also going to have Dunes on Saturday, March 28, which also features ex-members of Abe Vigoda.”

Callego said admission to most shows is free for the time being.

“We will have some shows that will have a $5 or $10 cover charge at the door, but I would say a good 90 to 95 percent of our shows will be free,” he said.

Purple Room After Dark takes place at 11 p.m., Friday and Saturday, at the Purple Room Restaurant and Stage, located at 1900 E. Palm Canyon Drive, in Palm Springs. Admission to most shows is free. For more information and a complete schedule, call 760-322-4422, or visit afterdark.purpleroompalmsprings.com.

Published in Previews

On Friday, Feb. 13, the Hard Rock Hotel Palm Springs will host an event featuring fashion and music—with a local twist.

The Seven|Six Trade Show is now in its fourth year; last year’s show was held at the Ace Hotel and Swim Club in Palm Springs. The Seven|Six is the brainchild of Coachella Valley local Omar Czar. Full disclosure: I am involved with the Seven|Six Trade Show—and I can assure you that Czar is a “jack of all trades” when it comes to throwing these types of events. He handles everything from booking the musical acts, to bringing in vendors for the show.

For the upcoming show, Omar is looking to bring in more than 50 fashion brands. The Seven|Six is open to any brand that has a seasonal line and a website. These loose rules make it easier for smaller and/or lesser-known brands to get their products exposed to a larger audience.

The first half of the show is open exclusively to scouts from larger retailers.

“We’re making brands available that (weren’t previously) available to locals,” Czar said.

He added that one of their main goals of the show is to encourage local companies to push for more exposure. While many of the participating vendors come from Los Angeles, he wants local designers to take advantage of the opportunity.

“I do it for the locals,” he said. “The local people are our main supporters.”

The Seven|Six also features musical acts at each event. This show will feature hip-hop artist Azizi Gibson, an artist on Flying Lotus’ Brainfeeder label. Several DJs will be playing, including All Night Shoes (that’s me!) and Seven|Six collaborator Oscar Smith IV, aka Captain OSIV.

With a local focus and international state of mind, the Seven|Six has something for everyone at every event. Also: Keep an eye out for a Seven|Six retail location, coming soon to the valley.

The Seven|Six Trade Show will take place from noon to midnight, Friday, Feb. 13, at the Hard Rock Hotel Palm Springs, located at 150 S. Indian Canyon Drive. Admission is $10. For more information, visit www.facebook.com/thesevensixx.

Published in Local Fun

This month, I’m launching a new mix series, called “New Palm Springs.”

Each mix will include tracks that I feel reflect our valley. I have always been inspired by my environment. I like cooler, chilled-out tracks for (our rare) rainy days. I like upbeat ones for sunny days.

Living in the Coachella Valley inspires me on different levels. While we are definitely a Southern California community, we also reflect diversity. Here, you can find people from all over the world, and everyone has a story. This can especially be illustrated by the artists who are attracted to this area.

I hope that, with this mix series, I can share my view of the valley and how it inspires me to create. Enjoy the mix by scrolling down and pressing play!

  • Michael McLardy, “You Feel” (DJ Le Roi Remix)
  • Johnny Bravo and Polina Griffith, “Holding Us” (Chris Rockz Dub)
  • Boris Dlugosch featuring Roisin Murphy, “Never Enough” (Jesse Rose Remix)
  • Lovebirds, “This Feeling” (Original Mix)
  • Years and Years, “Desire” (Rainer + Grimm Remix)
  • Adam K and Soha, “Lost In Orbit”
  • Bloc Party, “Truth” (Digitalism Remix)
  • Lapsley, “Falling Short” (JackLNDN Remix)
  • Aaliyah, “Rock the Boat” (Invoker Remix)
  • Carl Cox, “Keepee Uppee”
  • Branded James, “Balboa”
  • All Night Shoes, “Breakaway”
  • Templeton, “Better Represent”
  • Tennishero featuring Chelonis R. Jones, “Alone”

Fans of Independent resident DJ All Night Shoes’ monthly FRESH Sessions mix were treated last July to a guest mix by JF//Discord.

The “De:Volve” mix showed just what makes JF//Discord (Jeremy Ferguson) unique: It featured some familiar dance music—tinged with a darker side.

Ferguson recently discussed his interest in becoming a DJ.

“I just wanted to move people with good underground electronic music,” Ferguson said. “I think I have a good ear for underground electronic music and hopefully translate the connection I have with people to where they can dance.”

Ferguson isn’t shy about his adoration for metal music. He often wears a hoodie jacket with the logo of the metal band Death. He’s also known for his saying, “Horns Up!” He said first discovered metal music when he was in the fourth-grade.

“I first started off with Def Leppard and Pyromania, and I got that on cassette,” Ferguson said. “It was my first actual music purchase. When Hysteria (Def Leppard’s follow-up to Pyromania) came out, I got that one. There was a store in Palm Desert at the time … called Music Plus. My brother and I would go in there, and we’d just start looking through their audio section in this thing they had with four pairs of headphones you could use to listen to music. I remember seeing the list of bands … Autopsy, Death, Testament, Metallica, Slayer, Anthrax, Megadeth. We started listening to all these bands, and it piqued my interest. From there on out, it was just all metal.”

Ferguson was even a member of a metal band in high school.

“I was in a death metal band called Discordance the whole I time I was in high school, as the lead vocalist,” he said. “Metal took a real bad turn when all the grunge stuff started popping up. Nobody wanted to be associated with metal whatsoever in any way, shape or form. I was still kind of young back then, so I was like, ‘Maybe metal is starting to die, and maybe it’s going to start fading away.’

“I got exposed to electronic music. It was super-underground at the time, and the masses didn’t really like it yet.”

Ferguson’s interest in metal led him toward a different side of electronic music.

“I was drawn more to the underground, darker styles,” he said. “The darker production style (features) a lot of minor chords. House is a lot more soulful; deep house is a little bit more deep; and trance … is atmospheric and euphoric. I like the darker, more subtle, disturbing undertones with bass music. Right now, I really like the underground techno coming from Greece. Guys like Christian Cambas, Axel Karakasis, Spiros Kaloumenos … are putting out some really good techno.”

Ferguson’s equipment includes two of his own Pioneer CDJs and a Pioneer mixer. He said that while he started out using turntables and likes vinyl, a lot of the music he selects isn’t available on vinyl.

Ferguson also said the local music scene is not always so embracing.

“It sucks getting no love from anybody in your hometown,” he said. “You don’t get any love from the locals here at all. No one really comes out to shows. No one cares, really, and it’s just tough. It’s not just DJs, but it’s universal to all artists here. We have no venues to play at, and the venue owners don’t really understand electronic music, or care about it. It’s tough to get something built and keep it going on a regular basis.”

Still, Ferguson said he enjoys what he does as a DJ.

“The upside for me is focusing on that musical side of me and getting it out,” he said. “Hopefully, somebody that you play for in the crowd will connect with it. That’s the cool thing—when you expose somebody to a different style of music, and they say, ‘Oh yeah! I’ve never heard that before. Who is it?’ That’s what’s cool for me.”

Ferguson explained what he wants to happen in the Coachella Valley’s DJ scene.

“I’d like to see all of us come together as a community and not be so fragmented,” he said. “We should support each other whether or not we like the musical style—and I’m saying that for me, too, because I have my own certain style. We all need to be more open-minded and come together to make an impact for the local community here. That’s what we need in order for it to grow and succeed, and to get exposure from out of the valley.”

For more information on JF//Ferguson, visit www.facebook.com/JFDiscord1.

Dance, dance, dance!

I wanted to make this month’s mix something fun and inviting. Over time, anybody can collect a plethora of tracks—and as a DJ, that’s amplified. I’ve recently been listening to a lot of tracks that I haven’t played in a while, and it’s nice to look back on tracks that inspired me. After collecting a few “classic” remixes, I decided to make this mix for you. It’s perfect for listening by the pool or by the fire. I hope you enjoy this holiday FRESH mix!

By the way, my latest release, Pressure, is available now for free download via my SoundCloud page. Enjoy this month’s FRESH mix below!

  • Penguin Prison, “Hang on to Your Love” (Sade Cover)
  • Kill Me Softly featuring Jane Elizabeth Hanley, “Catch” (Ben Macklin Remix)
  • Allure, “Why”
  • George Maple, “Talk Talk” (JackLNDN Remix)
  • Prizm x Fergie, “Glamorous”
  • Kastle x Amtrac, “Hyperspace”
  • Russ Chimes, “Baiona”
  • Water Face, “Gotta Get Close”
  • Alesso featuring Tove Lo, “Heroes” (Amtrac Remix)
  • Mystery Skulls, “Paralyzed” (Aeroplane Remix)
  • Ben Macklin, “DARE”
  • Fleetwood Mac, “Dreams” (D.V.S Remix)
  • Mike Posner, “Cooler Than Me” (Eau Claire Remix)
  • Odesza, “Sun Models” (Elkoe Remix)
  • Moodblanc, “Make Love” (Ben Macklin Remix)
  • All Night Shoes featuring Giorg Tierez, “Pressure”

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