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After Zeptember comes Rocktober—not, repeat, not, Trucktober or any other “-tober” extrapolation. Those are consumer market mind-control operations perpetuated by the Deep State government, aka the alien lizard people who run the planet. If you listened to my short-wave radio show, you’d know this already.

Anyway: The scripted rock ’n’ roll TV series has been attempted many a time, but few ever crack the two-season mark. This makes sense, because rock that goes on and on for an interminable amount time just devolves into “progressive” or “jam” (both also evil creations of the lizard people), and no one needs that.

Here are 11 rock ’n’ roll series to stream in honor of Rocktober:

Metalocalypse (Seasons 1-4 on Amazon and iTunes)

One of the rare exceptions to the two-season rule, Brendon Small’s Metalocalypse thrashed on Adult Swim from 2006 to 2013, chronicling the exploits of death-metal superstars Dethklok. The band members may be morons, but they rule the world and throw down insanely brutal grooves that concert attendees only occasionally survive. The heaviest show ever.

Sex&Drugs&Rock&Roll (Seasons 1-2 on Hulu)

Denis Leary’s 2015-16 comedy Sex&Drugs&Rock&Roll is the Spinal Tap-esque tale of The Heathens, a notoriously volatile ’90s rock band who released their debut album and broke up on the same day. Twenty-odd years later, they reform with the help of Leary’s young rocker daughter (Elizabeth Gillies); egomaniacal hilarity ensues. SDRR isn’t a thinker, but it is rock ’n’ roll.

Vinyl (Season 1 on HBO Go and Amazon)

One-season wonder Vinyl presented a skewed dramatization of New York’s ’70s rock scene that didn’t quite nail the take—even with Martin Scorsese, Terence Winter and Mick Jagger producing, it wasn’t excessive enough. It’s still a fun ride, though, with faux New York Dolls and Velvet Underground stand-ins, and glimpses of the Boogie Nights greatness that could have been.

Flight of the Conchords (Seasons 1-2 on HBO Go and Amazon)

After 22 perfect episodes between 2007 and 2009, New Zealanders Jemaine Clement and Bret McKenzie quit their very-loosely autobiographical HBO series Flight of the Conchords, because writing music and comedy was too much work—what do you people expect of a musical comedy duo? Kanye West could only dream of creating a jam like “Hiphopopotamus vs. Rhymenoceros.”

Garfunkel and Oates (Season 1 on Amazon)

Comedy duo Riki Lindhome and Kate Micucci’s 2014 IFC series Garfunkel and Oates was sold short on arrival as a “female Flight of the Conchords,” which doesn’t do it justice: G&O is also dirty AF. Not to mention educational: “The Loophole” teaches young girls that anal sex is cool with Jesus, while “Weed Card” should be an anthem for medical marijuana. Women ahead of their time.

Roadies (Season 1 on Amazon)

It should have worked: Cameron Crowe (Almost Famous) made a 2016 tribute to the rock ’n’ roll lifestyle of touring starring Luke Wilson, Carla Gugino, Luis Guzmán and Imogen Poots; featuring drop-ins by Eddie Vedder, Lindsey Buckingham, Jim James and Gary Clark Jr.; and it all … went nowhere. Roadies mostly corrected its rom-com vs. rock course over 10 episodes, but it was too late.

The Get Down (Seasons 1-2 on Netflix)

While not as much of a mess as Vinyl, Baz Luhrmann’s 2016-17 musical history tour The Get Down, about the rise of hip-hop in the ’70s, still suffers from being a bit much (because, Baz Luhrmann). After a bloated debut episode, it gets waaay better and redeems itself over 10 subsequent hours, and the music is undeniably fantastic. Lament the coulda-been ’80s season.

Major Lazer (Season 1 on Hulu)

Major Lazer, a gonzo cartoon series that’s a mash-up of ’80s-style animation (think He-Man and G.I Joe), superhero culture, hip-hop and electronic dance music, premiered on then-obscure FXX’s even-more-obscure late-night ADHD animation block in 2015. Like the musical group it’s vaguely based on, Major Lazer is best experienced on quality drugs for maximum euphoria.

Dead Last (Season 1 on YouTube)

In 2001, The WB (known these days as The CW) launched and aborted a supernatural comedy series about a struggling bar band who stumbled upon the power to talk to ghosts—and then help them cross over from this realm. Yeeeah. Still, Dead Last’s Scooby-Doo charm and dark humor (the band doesn’t give a shit about the ghosts; they just wanna rock) is worth a YouTube binge.

Z Rock (Seasons 1-2 on Hoopla)

One of the more WTF? series in IFC’s WTF? history, 2008’s Z Rock followed the fictionalized hijinx of real-life Brooklyn power trio ZO2. By night, they were aspiring rock stars; by day, they were a children’s party band. ZO2 were apparently connected, with guests like Dave Navarro, Dee Snider, Gilbert Gottfried, Steel Panther and dozens more making hilarious cameos. But still, WTF?

Yacht Rock (Season 1 on YouTube)

In the mid-2000s, hipsters and music snobs alike were held rapt by Yacht Rock, a 12-episode mockumentary tribute to ’70s/’80s SoCal soft rock. Steely Dan, Kenny Loggins, Toto, The Doobie Brothers, Hall and Oates, The Eagles and even Van Halen are recreated (intentionally terribly) here; despite the grainy 2005 resolution, Yacht Rock is still vitally important. Just ask Weezer.

Published in DVDs/Home Viewing

On Sunday night at Coachella, Major Lazer proved there’s not a stage big enough for the group.

I was fortunate enough to see Major Lazer’s Coachella appearance in the Mojave tent in 2013, so I had some idea what to expect. That show was epic—and drew a crowd so large that there was no escape.

When I took my place at the ADA platform on the lawn about 100 yards or so away from the Coachella stage on Sunday night, I knew that this year’s Major Lazer performance was going to be big: Major Lazer’s crowd made Ice Cube’s crowd the night before look small in comparison.

Diplo, Walshy Fire and Jillionaire performed in typical Major Lazer fashion, combining their talents as producers and DJs to amp up the crowd—with some help from their female dancers. At one point, they had the crowd jump and then run to the right and then to the left. Yes, they asked the huge crowd, packed in like sardines in many places, to run.

Major Lazer utilized the Coachella Stage’s visual walls better than any other group I saw over the weekend. The visuals were awesome, and included scenes from the group’s cartoon television show, images of retro television sets, trippy designs and a “PEACE IS THE MISSION” flag. Of course, Peace Is the Mission happens to be the title of Major Lazer’s latest album.

However, the show’s most epic moment, by far, came when Major Lazer paid tribute to Prince by turning the Coachella Stage purple all the way across—and then announcing special guest Usher, who performed “I Would Die 4 U.”

It was the best tribute to Prince I witnessed through the weekend. Mavis Staples discussed her friendship with him and sang the chorus to “Purple Rain,” while Pete Yorn sang a few lines and the chorus of “Nothing Compares 2 U” at the beginning of his set. Mario Estrada of the Flusters wore a purple handkerchief in his front suit pocket, and many performers mentioned Prince’s name and their sadness over his passing. Big names like Guns N’ Roses and Ice Cube even dedicated their performances to Prince. But Major Lazer and Usher certainly did it best. 

Photos below by Kevin Fitzgerald; scroll down to see more from Sunday at Coachella.

Published in Reviews

The Coachella 2016 lineup will most likely be remembered as one of the weakest in years. While last year’s lineup at least offered variety, this year’s slate somehow seems … limited.

Still, with a little searching, you can find some great acts, both unheralded and well-known.


Friday, April 15 and 22

Volbeat

This Danish metal band is of the more surprising additions to the Coachella lineup, although metal isn’t entirely shunned by Coachella, considering Mastodon played in 2009, and Motorhead played in 2014. Volbeat combines rockabilly, rock ’n’ roll and metal to create an interesting sound. I’ll be the first to admit that Michael Poulsen’s voice is hard to take in, but former Anthrax guitarist Rob Caggiano helps make it all work. Volbeat might be the thing you’ll need to shake off the EDM/electropop vibes on Friday and prepare yourselves for Guns N’ Roses on Saturday.

Mavis Staples

At the age of 76, Mavis Staples (pictured above) has been enjoying a career rebirth thanks to collaborations with Jeff Tweedy of Wilco and a new album, Livin’ on a High Note, produced by M. Ward. Staples was part of the Staple Singers with her father, her brother and her two sisters. At The Band’s last live concert in 1978, she sang “The Weight.” While she’s been singing gospel for most of her life, and you’ll definitely hear some in her set, never fear: She’s got a powerful voice and will be a delight of your first afternoon at Coachella.

G-Eazy

G-Eazy is a rising star in the hip-hop world. The Oakland native has toured with 2 Chainz, Lil Wayne and Snoop Dogg. He also was part of the Vans Warped Tour in 2012. His most recent album, When It’s Dark Out, features collaborations with Big Sean, E-40, Chris Brown, Kehlani, Grace and others. Check out his recent track “Me, Myself and I.”

M83

M83 has been around since 2001, but it took a decade for the band to reach is critical and commercial peak to date, thanks to the concept album Hurry Up, We’re Dreaming. This French electronic band records music that’s catchy, ambient and haunting. The group will soon be releasing the follow-up to Hurry Up, titled Junk, which is sure to be a smash-success. Fun fact: The new album is inspired by ’70s and ’80s shows such as Punky Brewster and Who’s The Boss?


Saturday, April 16 and 23

BADBADNOTGOOD

The name is quite funny, but this Canadian group (right) has left a serious mark on the modern music world. While the group has recorded jazz instrumentals, it is also connected to the hip-hop world, and recently recorded an album with Ghostface Killah, Sour Soul. BADBADNOTGOOD is no stranger to Coachella; the band played the fest in 2012 and surprised the audience when it backed Frank Ocean. The jazzy instrumentals are fantastic, as is the collaborative spirit. Who knows what tricks the band members will have up their sleeves for Coachella 2016?

The Damned

If you call yourself a punk-rocker, and you aren’t familiar with The Damned, it’s time for school on Saturday. The Damned is one of the early British punk bands that formed in 1976 and defined the genre along with The Sex Pistols and The Clash. With goth, psychedelia and punk-rock attitude, The Damned was in a league of their own. Guitarist Captain Sensible struck out on his own in 1978 while The Damned were on hiatus and recorded a recover of “Jet Boy, Jet Girl.” He then went on to have hits with songs such as “Happy Talk” and a hilarious song titled “Wot,” as in, “You say Captain; I say ‘Wot.’” Be sure to make time for The Damned at Coachella; who knows when you’ll be able to see the group again?

Deerhunter

Hailing from Atlanta, Deerhunter is part of the awesome psychedelic rock scene you’ve been hearing thanks to a new group of bands. Frontman Bradford Cox identifies as gay; the title of the group’s debut album, Turn It Up Faggot, referenced what audiences used to scream when the band was first starting out. Few bands have been able to combine shoegaze and the indie-psych garage band sound together so well.

Ice Cube

While many people know Ice Cube for his horrible comedies, his hip-hop career is the stuff of legends. He penned most of NWA’s early material and then went on to a very successful solo career (even if a lot of his early material was in response to NWA’s diss tracks against him for leaving the group). Ice Cube was a straight-up gangsta rapper who had a voice and attitude that sounded like he was kicking in your door to come and get you if you were on his shit list; much of that attitude is still present when he performs live. While Ice Cube said he’d “try” to make a partial NWA reunion happen at Coachella on the heels of the biopic Straight Outta Compton, don’t expect Dr. Dre to show up; if anyone does appear with him, expect Yella, MC Ren, or possibly both.


Sunday, April 17 and 24

Pete Yorn

When you listen to Pete Yorn, not only do you hear some indie-rock; you also hear folk music and a bit of that Bakersfield country music sound from the ’70s. One of the best songs I’ve heard Yorn do is his cover of the Ramones’ “I Wanna Be Your Boyfriend.” Considering this guy has shared the stage with everyone from the Foo Fighters, to the Dixie Chicks, to Coldplay, take some time to check him out.

The Vandals

Along with Pennywise, the Descendents, Black Flag and Social Distortion, The Vandals are one of the bands people think of when it comes to Southern California punk. The band also has a humorous side, including hilarious takes on cowpunk, and a well-known Christmas album and song titled Oi to the World. Bassist Joe Escalante also well-known for being a lawyer, a radio show host and a conservative. Regardless of politics, nobody can deny that the Vandals kick ass.

Death Grips

The group Death Grips has a wild reputation. The experimental hip-hop trio from Sacramento has shunned the traditional ways of doing business and instead opted for shock value and performance art. The group used a picture of a member’s penis as the cover art for the album No Love Deep Webb. This was initially rejected (before later being used with a black slipcase over it); one of the alternative covers featured the legs of a man wearing khakis, white socks and black shoes. Written on the socks: “SUCK MY DICK.” One of Death Grips’ shows in 2013 ended quickly when the intro played, and a career suicide letter appeared onscreen—the group’s way of saying the show wasn’t happening. It seems Death Grips was never meant to be taken seriously, which is probably why it’s such a great group. Warning: Don’t get too close to the stage.

Major Lazer

I don’t think there’s a soul on this planet today who does not know who Diplo is. He’s been interviewed by Charlie Rose, produced a Madonna album, made a cartoon TV show … and made many infamous tweets. When Diplo gets together with Jillionaire and Walshy Fire for Major Lazer, it’s quite a spectacle. At Coachella in 2013, when they performed in the Mojave Tent, it was crammed beyond belief—and the energy drove the over-capacity crowd nuts to the point where I feared for my life. Major Lazer (below) will likely be performing at the same time as headliner Calvin Harris on the final night, but the group will bring the party. And remember: No Coachella story should end with the phrase, “and then I watched Calvin Harris.”

Published in Previews

Axe Cop (Thursday, April 16, FXX), season premiere: Few watched Fox’s failed attempt to take on both Adult Swim and Saturday Night Live with the late-night Animation Domination High-Def (ADHD—get it?) in 2013; fewer still are aware that the cartoon block moved to FXX in January of this year. Only the puttin’-the-“high”-in-High-Def Lucas Bros. Moving Co. and some lazy scribbling called Stone Quackers have been offering new episodes—until now! Axe Cop, about a cop with an axe and a great catchphrase (“I’ll chop your head off!”), finally returns for second season of epic ridiculousness from the mind of a 5-year-old, voiced by Nick Offerman (Parks and Recreation). But wait! There’s more ADHD goodness …

Major Lazer (Thursday, April 16, FXX), series debut: Major Lazer the musical entity is DJ/producer Diplo and a series of collaborators specializing in electro-house dancehall, reggae, moombahton, soca and other possibly-fictitious genres. Major Lazer the cartoon is a “rasta commando” with an ’80s G.I. Joe bent based on album covers and concert posters. It may look like an aesthetic clone of Adult Swim’s Mike Tyson Mysteries at first, but Major Lazer kicks the retro style up to frenetic levels to match the pounding beats. Adewale Akinnuoye-Agbaje (Lost) voices the titular lead, but the guest-actor list is where it really goes rando: Andy Samberg, Aziz Ansari, singer Charli XCX, rapper Riff Raff, Oscar winner J.K. Simmons (!), and Vampire Weekend’s Ezra Koenig as a “vegan vampire” (!!).

Bitten (Friday, April 17, Syfy), season premiere: Laura Vandervoort (Smallville) didn’t make much of a first impression in Bitten’s 2014 debut as a she-werewolf just trying to make it on her own in whatever big city Toronto is supposed to pass for onscreen. She was all blonde hair and blank stares, with none of the edge or humor that made surrounding Syfy hits like the late Being Human and the soon-to-be-late Lost Girl click—but she did get naked frequently, so there’s that. Season 2 looks to be more of the Twilight-adjacent same, as her ambition to break free from her beardy, mansplaining kin is further hampered by the arrival of … witches. Did we learn nothing from True Blood?

Lost Girl (Friday, April 17, Syfy), season premiere: On the downside, Season 5 will be the last for Canadian import Lost Girl. On the upside, the sexy supernatural soap’s final ride will consist of 16 episodes, up from the originally planned 13. Kenzi (Ksenia Solo) sacrificed herself to the Underworld at the end of last season, and the final mission of Bo (Anna Silk) is to bring her BFF back from the “dead,” which could prove difficult, as actress Solo is currently trapped somewhere at least as bad as Hell: AMC’s soggy period drama Turn: Washington’s Spies.

Orphan Black (Saturday, April 18, BBC America), season premiere: Ksenia Solo is also guesting on the new season of cult phenomenon Orphan Black—Tatiana Maslany can’t play every role … can she? In Season 3, the militaristic male Castor clones are targeting Sarah (Maslany) and her myriad clone sisters with—probably safe to assume—malicious intent; Helena (Maslany) is pregnant and imprisoned in a compound; and Cosima (Maslany) is somewhat on the mend. Season-opener episode “The Weight of This Combination” will be hard to miss, as it’ll be premiering simultaneously on BBC America, AMC, IFC, Sundance and We. “Sister” networks … oh, how cheeky.

Published in TV

It’s definitely hot out here.

The second day of the second weekend of Coachella 2013 featured high temperatures in the 90s by mid-afternoon. But despite the heat, most of the attendees were having a good time.

Still, many sought shade under the Mirage art exhibit, designed by Paul Clemente of Los Angeles. Mirage, a Frank Lloyd Wright-looking housing structure, was crowded in the open spaces under the roof.

“It’s pretty hot, but not too unbearable,” said John, from Santa Monica. “It bothers me a little bit, especially right now.”

The Helix Poeticus—a large mechanical snail that moves around—was close by, attracting the curiosity of attendees who were snapping photographs and touching it as it slowly slithered around the main stage area, close to Mirage. Eric Hendricks, from Orange County, was in awe.

“I love it; I love the interactiveness of Coachella with the people,” he said.

However, there was a potential downside.

"It’ll run you over if you’re not paying attention,” Hendricks said.

The Do LaB, a long-running exhibit at Coachella, features live DJs in an area within teepee-like structures. “The vibe is great, and there’s a lot of bass,” said an Indio man coming out of The Do LaB. The dance floor and the DJ stage resemble a smaller version of the dance parties once shown on MTV’s Spring Break.

On the subject of electronic dance music, Saturday’s lineup of EDM artists was featured in the Mohave tent as well as the large EDM-featured Sahara Tent.

Major Lazer took the Mojave stage at 6:25 p.m. on Saturday to a full house that extended to areas around the stage. Jillionaire and Walshy Fire jumped around, barking orders to the crowd to jump, put their hands up, and remove their shirts and toss them into the air. The people obeyed, sending a collage of various colored shirts into the air. Diplo stayed at the mixing board, offering remixes of songs from Nirvana, Damian Marley and Yeah Yeah Yeahs. Toward the end of the set, the group was joined by 2 Chainz, who performed earlier in the day.

The EDM in the Mojave and Sahara tents drew a large chunk of the crowd, trying to get a peek at artists such as Grizzly Bear and Fedde Le Grand. The main stage and the outdoor theater saw drops in crowd sizes between 6 and 8:30 p.m.

The ‘80s British ska band The Selecter took the stage at 7:10 in the Gobi tent to a small crowd. Many of the attendees had most likely never heard of the group, yet were dancing and bouncing around to the band’s anthems such as “On My Radio,” “Missing Words” and “Too Much Pressure.” The crowd had very few people “skanking”—a signature dance move done by ska devotees. But regardless, attendees couldn’t resist dancing or bouncing.

Punk icons the Descendents took the outdoor theater stage at 9:05. Milo Aukerman walked on and started playing “Everything Sucks” with some technical difficulties (the volume was too low) to a smaller-than-expected crowd. The band only plays a few shows a year due to Milo’s gig as a “plant researcher” at DuPont, and he chooses his vacation days wisely when it comes to touring. Still, the band had incredible energy and managed to pull in an audience that increased in size throughout the entire set. Milo read off a list if “punk commandments,” some of which were “thou shalt not commit laundry” and “thou shalt not take the van’s name in vain.” During what seemed to be a longer set than last weekend’s show, the Descendents looked happy and energetic.

The EDM presence remained strong through the evening. Moby … ahem, DJ Moby was performing at the Sahara, which was packed to capacity with an overflow. Moby, dressed in a Black Flag T-shirt, jumped up and down to pump up the crowd. He moved between fast-paced beats, ambient, trance, dubstep, and even a few cuts from his own albums. The visuals that flashed through the video screens were at times psychedelic, somewhat chaotic, and breathtaking. 

As The xx prepared to take the main stage, with Franz Ferdinand scheduled to play in the neighboring Mojave tent, DJ Moby’s audience began to thin out.

While Phoenix played on the main stage, New Order headlined at the Mojave tent. For a moment, it felt like a Metallica concert: New Order used the same intro as Metallica, Ennio Morricone’s “The Ecstasy of Gold.” When Bernard Sumner and the rest of the band took the stage, Sumner addressed a technical difficulty, thanking the sound engineer for failing to fade properly.

While Sumner (guitar and vocals) and Stephen Morris (drums) both look like they have aged into AARP status, make no mistake: They still rock! While Peter Hook is sitting out this reunion (and took a shot at the band in the press by referring to them as a “tribute band”), Tom Chapman fit in nicely on bass guitar.

Throughout the set, Sumner took shots at main stage headliner, Phoenix. “Thank you for being here instead of over there,” he said. Later on, he said—while experiencing technical difficulties in between songs—that they were out to prove to Phoenix that louder doesn’t mean better.

New Order played songs from throughout their career. “Your Silent Face,” from 1983’s Power, Corruption and Lies, featured a makeshift film in the background that made light of mankind’s destruction, showing shipwrecks off the shores of beautiful islands, helicopters flying over ravaged cities, shanties in parts of Los Angeles, and a big tidal wave hitting homes on the L.A. coast line. The band’s performance of “Blue Monday,” their hit single that was later covered by Orgy in the late '90s, delighted the audience. The former Joy Division members paid tribute to the late Ian Curtis with a portrait of him appearing on the backdrop as they played “Love Will Tear Us Apart.”

While I was leaving, I had one question in mind: Phoenix who? Performances on other stages stole the show from the early evening until the very end.

Photos by Noelle Haro-Gomez

Published in Reviews