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Perhaps you noticed that the Jerry Seinfeld program featuring the man interviewing comic guests has moved from Crackle to Netflix—and all of the old episodes are available on Netflix for you to peruse.

What you might not have noticed is Jerry’s deal wasn’t just to run the old shows: A new season of interviews just went up on Netflix, and it’s a healthy bunch.

As of July 6, there are 12 new episodes, including one with Jerry Lewis that was probably the comic legend’s last TV appearance. Others include Dave Chappelle, Ellen DeGeneres, Tracy Morgan, Dana Carvey and Kate McKinnon.

The winner in the new bunch would have to be the episode with Alec Baldwin, who does a hilarious re-enactment of a Broadway role that leaves Seinfeld in stitches. McKinnon is a close second, with her sad impersonation of a dog pooping and her winning rendition of Jessica Lange in American Horror Story (“Knotty pine!”). Actually, her impersonation of a Scottish man ruminating on Massapequa, N.Y. (Seinfeld’s hometown) might be the funniest thing in the new season.

As usual, he gets some pretty nutty cars in which to pick up his stars, including a dune buggy, an ’84 Ferrari and ’77 Toyota Land Cruiser.

Leave it to Seinfeld to take a format that looks lame and turn it into one of the more entertaining things on Netflix. The guy is a master.

Comedians in Cars Getting Coffee is now streaming on Netflix.

Published in DVDs/Home Viewing

The sequel to Finding Nemo is a bit darker than its predecessor, with Ellen DeGeneres returning as the voice of Dory, the lovable fish with short-term memory issues.

An event triggers a memory of family in her little brain, and she sets off on a journey to find her mom and dad (voiced by Diane Keaton and Eugene Levy). Pals Marlin (Albert Brooks) and Nemo (Hayden Rolence) join Dory on her quest, which culminates at an aquarium/amusement park that is graced with voice announcements by the actual Sigourney Weaver. Dory winds up in a pond, in a bucket of dead fish, and swimming around inside a lot of dark pipes.

In some ways, Finding Dory is to Finding Nemo what The Empire Strikes Back was to Star Wars: It’s a darker, slightly scarier chapter. However, it still delivers on the heartwarming elements, and contains some good laughs, many of them provided by Ed O’Neill as the voice of a conniving octopus. We also find out how and why Dory can speak whale, as she reconvenes with an old friend, Destiny the Whale Shark (Kaitlin Olson).

Overall, Finding Dory is not as good as the first chapter, but it’s still good, and DeGeneres rules as the voice of Dory. Her voicing of Dory definitely goes into the Animation Voices Hall of Fame.

Make sure to stay all the way through the credits for a rather lengthy final scene!

Finding Dory is playing at theaters across the valley.

Published in Reviews