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Jimmy Boegle

A TV chef trying to pull off a successful stage show? Frankly, it sounds like a terrible idea.

But then again, Alton Brown is not your average TV chef. The show for which he’s best known (outside of Iron Chef America, perhaps), Good Eats—which ran on the Food Network from 1999 to 2012—is unlike any other cooking show in that it combines science, potty humor, theatrics and silliness.

“Theatrics,” of course, is the key word there: Alton Brown is as much of an entertainer as he is a chef, and that’s why his “Alton Brown Live” show—aka the Edible Inevitable Tour—ultimately works. (This show was produced by the some of the same folks who created the successful “Mythbusters: Behind the Myths” tour; “Alton Brown Live” surpasses “Behind the Myths,” because Brown is a natural entertainer, whereas Jamie Hyneman, while a lovable cranky genius, is not.)

The show kicked off at Palm Desert’s McCallum Theatre on Friday, Oct. 18, and is slated to head to almost 50 cities between now and next March.

On one hand, getting to see the world premiere of a show is a treat: The audience gets to watch something that’s never been seen before by a full audience. On the other hand, first performances are always test cases, to an extent, so certain bits will be raw and unpolished. Fortunately for those of us in the McCallum audience, the only real seriously unpolished aspects of Friday show came regarding the music. (More on that later.)

The show kicked off before the 8 p.m. curtain with a Good Eats staple: the lovable, burping-and-farting sock puppets, which represent yeast. (Yeast, you see, gives off gas.) Brown explained at one point during the show that he originally wanted the puppets to appear live, but producers couldn’t get that sound just right, so the yeast puppets were exiled to humorous and increasingly elaborate hijinks on the video screen before the show, at intermission, and at the very end of the show.

“I wanted a preshow entirely built on farts,” Brown joked.

Brown noted that he built his road show “based on stuff that nobody would let me do on television,” including upping the fart-to-burp ratio with the yeast puppets—and singing an occasional song. This led into a song he said he’d written for his daughter: “Is Cooking Hard?” The ditty started with the premise that cooking is not all that hard if, as the chorus explained, “you can understand a few rules you could count on five hands.” The joke was that with each singing of the chorus, the number of rules and hands went up.

On that first song, it was just Alton and a guitar; for subsequent songs, he was joined by Good Eats regulars Jim Pace (who played many roles on the show, most notably Alton’s lawyer) on drums, and music composer Patrick Belden on guitar.

Those songs were, by far, the weakest part of the show. The songs themselves were charming enough—a tune about the dangers of airport shrimp cocktails, for example, was quite funny—but Alton is a much better jokester and chef than he is a singer. There were also serious glitches during two of the songs: His attempt at an angry hard-rock song/Spinal Tap parody, “Easy Bake,” suffered from sound issues and distortion, and his “TV Chef” song toward the end of the show included missed cues and a do-over. (Having the lyrics to the songs displayed on the screen above the stage was a big help—even if the display didn’t always match what Alton was singing.) These glitches will subside as the tour rolls on, but even though the songs are amusing and—in the case of “TV Chef”—provocative, they’ll never stand up to the parts of the show in which Alton is doing what he does best: discussing and demonstrating cooking.

His illustrated monologue on “10 Things I’m Pretty Sure I Am Sure About Food” was pure genius. (Rule No. 3 came from a notable Iron Chef America food debacle: “Trout doesn’t belong in ice cream.”) His ice-cream-making machine—which harnesses the power of a carbon-dioxide fire extinguisher—was brilliant. And the highlight of the show came when he unveiled Mega Bake: an Easy Bake oven gone insane, harnessing the power of 54 thousand-watt lights that leads to interior temperatures approaching 700 degrees Fahrenheit.

The ice-cream-maker didn’t work exactly as planned—there was too much carbon dioxide and too little chocolate milk—and the Mega Bake pizza-making turned into a food fight when the audience volunteer accidentally hit Brown in the face with some cheese, but it was all in good fun, as was the audience Q&A portion, which included almost as many Doctor Who questions as food questions. (Brown is a big fan of the British show.)

“Alton Brown Live” is a fantastic night of entertainment. Let’s just hope it doesn’t inspire other TV chefs to pursue similar endeavors.

Friday, 18 October 2013 08:00

The Lucky 13: Studio One 11's Terry Larson

Fans of the McCallum Theatre’s Open Call talent project are familiar with Terry S. Larson, 51; he was one of the 2013 finalists in the renowned competition. Regulars at Studio One 11, at 67555 E. Palm Canyon Drive in Cathedral City, are also familiar with Larson: He works at the LGBT bar as a server and bartender—and wows audiences with his singing voice in concert every Tuesday at 6 p.m., and every other Friday at 8 p.m.; there is no cover. For more information, visit www.studio-one-11.com. The Inglewood native and Cathedral City resident was kind enough to recently answer The Lucky 13.

What was the first concert you attended?

Journey at the Forum in Los Angeles.

What was the first album you owned?

The Carpenters, Close to You.

What bands are you listening to right now?

I mostly listen to new Broadway cast albums, and Sinatra, Linda Eder, and Michael Buble.

What artist, genre or musical trend does everyone love, but you don’t get?

Kayne West.

What musical act, current or defunct, would you most like to see perform live?

The Carpenters.

What’s your favorite musical guilty pleasure?

Barry Manilow.

What’s your favorite music venue?

Studio One 11 in Cathedral City (where I sing each week). :)

What’s the one song lyric you can’t get out of your head?

“Where is love? Does it fall from skies above?” from “Where Is Love?” in the musical Oliver!

What band or artist changed your life? How?

Barbra Streisand. (I come) from a church background, (and) it was apparent to me they didn’t sing with a lot of sincere emotion. Her voice brought me into the real world.

You have one question to ask one musician. What’s the question, and who are you asking?

I would ask Patti LuPone how she could produce a tear while singing “Don’t Cry for Me, Argentina” every night during Evita.

What song would you like played at your funeral?

I would like Linda Eder to sing “I’ll Be Seeing You.”

Figurative gun to your head, what is your favorite album of all time?

Barbra Streisand, The Broadway Album.

What song should everyone listen to right now?

“With You,” from Ghost the Musical. (Scroll down to hear it.)

It was not just another night in downtown Palm Springs.

Hundreds of people from across the Coachella Valley and beyond gathered at Clinic Bar and Lounge in downtown Palm Springs on the evening of Wednesday, Oct. 16, for the Coachella Valley Independent's Monthly-Edition Launch Party. 

The crowd was enticed by a live work of art created in front of their eyes by Ryan "Motel" Campbell; a DJ set by All Night Shoes (aka Alex Harrington), followed by several sets from The Vibe; and, of course, two hours of free drinks.

Scroll down to see some photos of the event (most of which were taken by Kevin Fitzgerald). If you have pics you'd like to add to the photo gallery, email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Thanks to all who came, as well as the fine folks at Clinic Bar and Lounge, and Venus Studios Art Supply.

Crave Dessert Restaurant Re-Opening in New Digs

Crave, which its owners tout as Palm Springs’ first dessert restaurant, is reopening in a bigger space at 6 p.m., Friday, Oct. 18.

The restaurant—which opened in 2011 at 390 N. Palm Canyon Drive—has a new home at 301 N. Palm Canyon Drive, Suite 200. The new spot is on the second story and features two patios. Customers will now be able to enjoy tasty dessert treats, coffee, beer and wine while overlooking the goings-on at the Amado Road intersection.

Crave does not only have new digs; it also has some new owners: Original owner Davy Aker has been joined by Raymond McCallister and Larry Abel, co-owners of businesses including Abel McCallister Designs and the Party Lab.

Crave will be open Wednesday through Sunday. Watch www.craveps.com for more info.

Fantasy Springs Launches Cupcake Challenge

Cupcakes for a good cause—has there ever been a sweeter clause?

Forgive the bad poetry (or whatever the heck that was); we’re excited about the second annual Fantasy Cupcake Challenge, taking place from 1 to 4 p.m., Sunday, Nov. 17, at the Fantasy Springs Resort Casino, 84245 Indio Springs Parkway, Indio.

Here’s how it works: Pros and non-pros alike can enter (by Sunday, Oct. 20) for prizes up to $750. Entrants then bake up a whole bunch of cupcakes (including four full-size entries and at least 300 tastes) and bring them in. The general public is invited to enjoy those tastes—tickets are $30, or $10 for kids age 3 to 11—and vote for their favorites while perusing a silent auction and enjoying live music.

Best of all: Proceeds go to Well in the Desert. In that spirit, anyone bringing three canned/nonperishable goods to the box office on the day of the event gets $5 off admission.

Yum. And yay!

Get more details at www.fantasyspringsresort.com/cupcakes.

Purple Room Update: Opening Planned for Oct. 24

More details have emerged about the revival of the Purple Room at Club Trinidad.

As we’ve previously reported, TRIO owners Tony Marchese and Mark Van Laanen have taken over management of the space at 1900 E. Palm Canyon Drive, which has had a controversial year. Well, we now have an opening date: Thursday, Oct. 24, at 3 p.m.

The supper club and lounge will offer live music booked by Gary and Joan Gand, of the Gand Band, and will feature food service until midnight Tuesday through Thursday, as well as Sunday—with service going until 2 a.m. on Friday and Saturday.

“Our Continental menu will have a mix of everything,” Van Laanen said in a news release. “From deviled eggs and Sloppy Joe sliders to fresh seafood and steaks, we’ll have delicious options for every palate.”

Get more details at purpleroompalmsprings.com.

In Brief

The Miramonte Resort and Spa, 45000 Indian Wells Lane, Indian Wells, is launching a series of wine events for the season. “Le Serate di Vino” events will feature wines complemented with the food of executive chef Robert Nyerick; the first event, on Friday, Oct. 25, will be the Oyster Bay progressive wine dinner, with five New Zealand wines paired with hors d’oeuvres, three savory courses and dessert, all for $75. Call 760-341-7200 for reservations or more info. … Dragon Sushi, in the 68300 block of East Palm Canyon in Cathedral City, is now open. As reported in this space before, it’s the sister restaurant of the much-loved Dragon Sushi in Indio. … Giuseppe’s Pizza and Pasta, 1775 E. Palm Canyon Drive, Palm Springs, held a Make My Pizza Challenge contest last month. Almost 200 folks entered, and the finalists were vetted on Sept. 19. The winning pizza: Christopher Giusto’s eggplant Parmesan pizza, featuring red sauce, breaded eggplant medallions, roast garlic, basil and ricotta cheese (pictured above). That’s not the only news from the Funkey family, which owns Giuseppe’s (as well as Bar in downtown Palm Springs): Next to Giuseppe’s is their soon-to-open Smoke Tree Supper Club. Watch for further details. … Bernie’s Lounge and Supper Club, featuring food by chef Jason Moffitt, will be opening soon at 292 E. Palm Canyon Drive, Palm Springs. … Earlier this year, a Kickstarter campaign went live with this pitch: “My name is Kelly McFall. With the help of my brother Kreg and my mother Jan, we are opening a restaurant in the El Paseo shopping district of Palm Desert." It went on: "Wilma and Frieda’s Cafe will be a full service breakfast and lunch farmhouse cafe with an urban twist.” The needed $50,000 was raised, and now the café, at 73575 El Paseo Drive, is open; details at www.wilmafrieda.com.

The Rebel Noise is hitting the road. The four-piece Palm Springs rock band was formed in 2011 by brother-and-sister team Collin Pintor (lead guitar) and Ashley Pintor (drums), as well as Leopoldo Rodriquez (guitar/vocals); Ben Travis (bass) later joined the fold. The group is heading for San Diego, Santa Barbara and Atascadero later this month to share music and make new friends and fans. They’ll be back on local stages soon—including a New Year’s Eve show at Schmidy’s Tavern in Palm Desert. In the meantime, follow them and hear their music at www.reverbnation.com/therebelnoise and www.facebook.com/the.rebel.noise. Travis, 42, was recently was kind enough to answer The Lucky 13, as was Ashley Pintor, 29.


Ben Travis

What was the first concert you attended?

The Charlie Daniels Band with Molly Hatchet as openers. I was, like, 7 or 8, and have no clue why my parents would take me to that.

What was the first album you owned?

Devo (the one where they are wearing flower pots on their heads).

What bands are you listening to right now?

The Black Angels, Korn, Oasis, Buckcherry, and Tom Petty.

What artist, genre or musical trend does everyone love, but you don’t get?

Jazz.

What musical act, current or defunct, would you most like to see perform live?

Led Zeppelin.

What’s your favorite musical guilty pleasure?

I am a sucker for pop music.

What’s your favorite music venue?

Red Rocks Amphitheatre in Colorado.

What’s the one song lyric you can’t get out of your head?

“I’m on the night train; I can never get enough,” Guns N’ Roses, “Night Train.” I had various images about that lyric in high school until I read later on in life it was about Izzy and Slash drinking $2 bottles of cheap wine called Night Train.

What band or artist changed your life? How?

Kurt Cobain. (He showed) how simple songs can be great songs.

You have one question to ask one musician. What’s the question, and who are you asking?

I have so many questions for so many musicians, it’s hard to answer.

What song would you like played at your funeral?

Not sure about that. I can see the intro to “Hells Bells” being played at some point, though. That would be badass.

Figurative gun to your head, what is your favorite album of all time?

Guns N’ Roses, Appetite for Destruction. That album was my anthem in my teenage years.

What song should everyone listen to right now?

Man, that varies (depending) on everyone’s situation and condition at the moment.


Ashley Kay Pintor

What was the first concert you attended?

The Ataris.

What was the first album you owned?

It’s really sad that I’m having difficulty remembering this. I was a late bloomer with music. Possibly No Doubt.

What bands are you listening to right now?

Band of Skulls, The Kills, Band of Horses, The Dead Weather, Daft Punk, TOKiMONSTA. Umm, everything.

What artist, genre or musical trend does everyone love, but you don’t get?

I don’t mean to offend, but it’s got to be country. Sorry, guys. I’m not a hater; I just really don’t get it.

What musical act, current or defunct, would you most like to see perform live?

Nirvana, whether it be Unplugged or the Live and Loud concert they played in Seattle. Either way, I know it would be legend—wait for it—dary!

What’s your favorite musical guilty pleasure?

As of late, I hate to admit this: Katy Perry! It makes me want to go put whipped cream on my boobs and top them off with cherries.

What’s your favorite music venue?

I would have to say the Mesa Amphitheatre.

What’s the one song lyric you can’t get out of your head?

“If you want to sing out, sing out. And if you want to be free, be free, ’cause there’s a million things to be. You know that there are.” Ohhh, Cat Stevens.

What band or artist changed your life? How?

I would have to definitely say there are two: Postal Service got me through some pretty insane moments in my life. I wont get “emo” right now. Second, the Foo Fighters. Because of Dave Grohl and also getting to meet Taylor Hawkins, my love for music has gone through the roof. The energy and love for music the men in that band have is incredible, and they continue to out-do themselves with each new album.

You have one question to ask one musician. What’s the question, and who are you asking?

Dave Grohl: “Can I buy you a beer?”

What song would you like played at your funeral?

Foo Fighters, “Everlong” (acoustic, of course).

Figurative gun to your head, what is your favorite album of all time?

Foo Fighters, The Colour and the Shape.

What song should everyone listen to right now?

Umm … I’ll answer that at our next show. ;)

What: Pablo’s Chicken-Fried Steak

Where: Don and Sweet Sue’s Café, 68995 Ramon Road, Cathedral City

How much: $10.95

Contact info: 760-770-2760; www.donandsweetsues.com

Why: No knife necessary.

Every so often, I get a craving for a food that is terrible for my body, but fantastic for my taste buds. (The most embarrassing of these cravings: a Moons Over My Hammy from Denny’s. Yes, I have much to be ashamed of.)

Recently, one of these cravings struck: I needed chicken-fried steak, and I needed it now. And I knew just where to head: Don and Sweet Sue’s Café, in Cathedral City. Of course, Don and Sweet Sue’s is located on that stretch of Ramon Road that’s been FUBAR for several months now thanks to a much-needed repaving project, but lane restrictions and traffic backups weren’t going to stop me.

The prize for dealing with the traffic annoyances was ample: A big-but-not-obnoxious piece of battered, tenderized steak; some savory country gravy; two perfectly done over-easy eggs; hash browns; and toast.

Yummy.

While I appreciated the presence of the bread, potatoes and eggs, I didn’t come all this way for them; no, I was here for that steak and that gravy, and it was perfect. The breading’s crispness held up just enough under that gravy, which was splendidly seasoned—and the steak was tender enough to be cut with a fork. Yes, the good folks at Don and Sweet Sue’s provided me with a steak knife, as you can see in the photo, but the knife returned to the kitchen unused.

And I returned to Ramon Road and its construction delays carefree and happy. My craving was satisfied, and the world was a happy place.

The Coachella Valley Independent was born on Oct. 25, 2012.

The very first story to go live at CVIndependent.com was, really, nothing special. In fact, the piece was more of a test piece for us to build the website around than what I’d call “journalism.” It was just three sentences, plus a photo, explaining that Restless Heart was going to be playing a show at the Agua Caliente Casino Resort Spa.

The headline, taken from the name of a Restless Heart song: “Tell Me What You Dream.”

I never dreamt that less than a year later, the Independent would be where it is today. This summer, the Independent became the first Coachella Valley publication to ever be admitted to the Association of Alternative Newsmedia. We have now published about 700 stories online—and our October print edition, hitting streets this week, includes about 30 contributors and marks our debut as a monthly publication.

So ... It’s time to celebrate.

If you’re free, or if you can get free, I encourage you to head to Clinic Bar Lounge, 188 S. Indian Canyon Drive in Palm Springs, on Wednesday, Oct. 16. From 6 p.m. until midnight or so, contributors to and friends of the Independent will host a big party, to celebrate both our monthly print debut and our one-year online anniversary—and everyone (21 and over) is invited.

The bar will be open (translation: free drinks) from 6 to 8 p.m. But this is not just a drink-and-stand-around event: All Night Shoes (whose monthly Independent Fresh Mix debuted this month) will be DJ’ing all night, and artist Ryan “Motel” Campbell will be creating a live mural—on a 10-foot-by-5-foot canvas—as the party plays out around him.

It’s going to be a great time. I really hope you can be there.

Our switch to a monthly print schedule comes with new features. For example, esteemed music contributor Brian Blueskye will now be offering a look at the upcoming month’s local music events in every print issue; catch the debut of the Blueskye Report in print, or online later this week.

Of course, as we continue to grow, the Independent is looking for people to join the family. We’re always looking for writers who are willing to report on local matters, and on the sales side, we’d love to add another advertising rep or two. If interested, email me at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

As always, thanks for reading—and I hope to see you on Wednesday, Oct. 16.

Ryan “Motel” Campbell is asked how he’d categorize his art.

He pauses to contemplate. “I’d say that my work is … contemporary, fluid motion, cubist, urban, contemporary.”

He laughs. “That’s the short version,” he adds.

The description (aside from the two mentions of “contemporary,” perhaps) actually fits Campbell’s works nicely—as everyone can see at 6 p.m., Wednesday, Oct. 16, when Campbell will paint a 10-foot-by-5-foot mural live, as part of the Coachella Valley Independent’s Official Launch Party.

The Independent is celebrating our one-year anniversary online, as well as the launch of our monthly edition, with free drinks from 6 to 8 p.m.; a DJ set by All Night Shoes; and the live creation of the mural on canvas, which will later be donated to the LGBT Community Center of the Desert, for the organization’s silent auction at the Center Stage event.

Campbell, 32, is an accomplished artist whose works and installations have been featured in galleries far and wide. (See just a small sampling of his works at www.ryanmotelcampbell.com/index.html.)

Ryan “Motel” Campbell—the nickname came to be, he says, because friends used to regularly stay at his house, aka the “Motel Campbell”—teaches regularly at Venus Studios, which is co-sponsoring the launch party; the good folks there are donating the canvas on which Campbell will paint, as well as other materials.

He says he often came to the desert while he was growing up in Los Angeles, and he credits the Coachella Valley for giving him inspiration.

“I really love the desert—something about the energy, something about just being here, I connected with immediately,” he says. “I would come here from Los Angeles and feel just completely disconnected, which is great.”

As a kid in L.A., Campbell fell in love with graffiti.

“I went and wrote on every mailbox and every sidewalk, and I’m not proud of it,” he says. “… I knew better. I had a very nice upbringing. My family taught me to always be respectful. But I needed to have my voice heard.”

In 2001, he decided to move to the Coachella Valley; his mom already lived in here, in Palm Desert.

“I had the opportunity to move here and jumped all over it,” he says. “I moved here—and found myself totally bored out of my mind.

“Oddly enough, in the bag of things that I brought with me—my worldly possessions—I had my sketchbook. So I broke out my sketchbook, and I just started drawing. I started looking at a lot of the graffiti I was doing and saw the monotony in it. I saw that I wasn’t really progressing. … I felt like I needed to push myself.”

Campbell started visiting local museums and galleries; those visits led to what he called a “wave of inspiration.”

“I said, ‘You know, I want to do something different. I want to try to really take the fundamentals of this graffiti art … and put it into creating something that’s more fine art’—art that spoke to me, that I was able to connect with and identify with and really enjoy.”

The melding of influences has led to Campbell’s “contemporary, fluid motion, cubist, urban, contemporary” style.

“It’s very inspired,” Campbell says about his art. “It’s inspired by movement. It’s inspired by motion, a lot of fluidity. I think that depicted where I was and where I am in life. I like to cruise through. I don’t want to fight too much.”

Today, in a way, Campbell has come full-circle: He often teaches alternative-education classes to kids with whom he can closely relate.

“I was basically going in to teach (kids who were just like) myself when I was in high school,” he says. “I was going in to teach kids who were rebellious and angry and wanted to do vandalism and go out and make a name for themselves.”

He says some kids even recognized him and his works from his graffiti days.

“The question (from the kids) was always like, ‘How come you don’t go out any more?’ he says. “For me, the necessity and the outlet have changed over time.”

Today, he says, kids have more outlets than he did when he was young. He cites skate parks as an example, as well as some of the efforts that forward-thinking arts organizations like Venus Studios are making.

“Kids want to go out and paint. They want to go out and write their name,” he says. “They want people to go out and see the work that they’re making. What I’ve been able to do with Venus Studios is we have Spray Paint Session Saturdays, where we invite people to come in and bring their spray paint. We give them a large-size canvas to paint on, to display their work in a venue where they’re not harming anybody, and they’re not getting into any trouble. They have an audience that’s interested in what they have to say, in a place where they can show their work.”

When asked what attendees at the Independent Launch Party can expect while Campbell spends four to six hours creating a brand-new work of art, he says that he often draws inspiration from the audience when he produces live works.

So come and help create Campbell create a contemporary, fluid-motion, cubist, urban, contemporary piece of art—for a good cause to boot.

Ryan “Motel” Campbell will paint starting at 6 p.m., Wednesday, Oct. 16, at the Coachella Valley Independent’s Official Launch Party. The event takes place at Clinic Bar and Lounge, 188 S. Indian Canyon Drive, Palm Springs. A hosted bar will be open from 6 to 8 p.m., and All Night Shoes will spin music all night. Admission is free. For more information, call 760-904-4208. Below: “Reclining Nude” (from life study), 48 by 36 inches; acrylic, spray paint and charcoal on wood. Above: “Sorting It All Out,” 24 by 24 inches; acrylic, spray paint and charcoal on wood.

Are You There, God? It’s Me, Karen Carpenter—from the Palm Canyon Theatre

Margaret Simon moves to New Jersey, falls in love, enters sixth grade, joins an all-girl group, obsesses about bras and becomes a woman—all while singing the hits of the Carpenters. The play is loosely based on Judy Blume’s coming-of-age novel. 8 p.m., Friday, Oct. 18, and Saturday, Oct. 19; 2 p.m., Sunday, Oct. 20. $25. At 538 N. Palm Canyon Drive, Palm Springs. 760-323-5123; www.palmcanyontheatre.org.

Frida—The Musical

This bio-musical about the life of world-famous painter Frida Kahlo shows the folklore, drama and tenderness of this exceptional woman, who endured the most intense physical and emotional pain. Its brought to the stage by a cast of 30 actors, singers and dancers; it ties together the music and popular culture that Frida valued so much. 8 p.m., Friday, Oct. 25. $29 to $79. At the McCallum Theatre, 73000 Fred Waring Drive, Palm Desert. 760-340-2787; www.mccallumtheatre.com.

House of the Rising Son—from the Desert Rose Playhouse

Tom Jacobson’s play is a mysterious romance that evokes the steamy atmosphere of the French Quarter in New Orleans. The action centers on Dr. Trent Varro, who brings his younger lover, Felix, back to New Orleans to meet his wealthy relatives. Ghostly sightings and unexpected revelations follow. 8 p.m., Friday and Saturday; 2 p.m., Sunday, through Sunday, Oct. 27. $25 to $28. At 69260 Highway 111, Rancho Mirage. 760-202-3000; www.desertroseplayhouse.org.

Master Class—from Coachella Valley Repertory

Toward the end of her career, opera star Maria Callas taught master classes at Lincoln Center. In this play, by Terrence McNally, the audience gets to watch her in action with her students, as she reflects on her life and career. 7:30 p.m., Wednesday through Saturday; 2 p.m., Sunday, from Wednesday, Oct. 23, through Sunday, Nov. 10. (Oct. 23 and 24 are previews.) $35 to $50. At the Atrium, 69930 Highway 111, No. 116, Rancho Mirage. 760-296-2966; www.cvrep.org.

The Mousetrap—from Desert Theatreworks

Agatha Christie’s well-known whodunit features chills and laughs as the harried detective tries to solve the mystery before another of the lodgers at Monkswell Manor winds up dead. 7 p.m., Friday; 2 and 7 p.m., Saturday; and 2 p.m., Sunday, from Friday, Nov. 1, through Sunday, Nov. 10. $23 to $25. At the Arthur Newman Theatre in the Joslyn Center, 73750 Catalina Way, Palm Desert. 760-980-1455; www.dtworks.org.

The Sound of Music—from the Palm Canyon Theatre

The classic Rodgers and Hammerstein musical. 7 p.m., Thursday; 8 p.m., Friday and Saturday; 2 p.m., Sunday, from Friday, Oct. 4, through Sunday, Oct. 13. $32. At 538 N. Palm Canyon Drive, Palm Springs. 760-323-5123; www.palmcanyontheatre.org.

Standing on Ceremony: The Gay Marriage Plays

Keith Coleman, in association with Palm Springs Pride, presents an encore performance of a series of short plays, conceived by Brian Shnipper and written by Emmy-, Tony- and Pulitzer-winning authors. 8 p.m., Friday, Nov. 1, and Saturday. Nov. 2. $29 and $39. At the Annenberg Theater at the Palm Springs Art Museum, 101 Museum Drive, Palm Springs. 760-325-4490; www.annenbergtheater.org.

The Sudden Glide—from Script2Stage2Screen

This comedy, written by David A. Crespy, explores the life of a 60-something Southern-born actress, Yvonne Allaway, as she faces the toughest hurdle of her life—a fifth Academy Award nomination for Best Actress, and she’s again pitted against Meryl Streep. On the way to the ceremony, she is given just enough coke and booze to throw her off her game—and make things very interesting. 7:30 p.m., Friday, Oct. 4, and Saturday, Oct. 5. $10. At the Unitarian Universalist Church of the Desert, 72425 Via Vail, Rancho Mirage. 760-702-0062; www.script2stage2screen.com.

Vivien—from the Palm Canyon Theatre

The play offers a journey beyond Vivien Leigh’s triumphs into the madness that tortured her. She reflects on her tumultuous relationship with Laurence Olivier and her tragic battles with manic depression and tuberculosis. 8 p.m., Friday, Oct. 25, and Saturday, Oct. 26; 2 p.m., Sunday, Oct. 27. $25. At 538 N. Palm Canyon Drive, Palm Springs. 760-323-5123; www.palmcanyontheatre.org.

When Andrea “Andi” Spirtos was diagnosed with breast cancer in 1993, she did not have health insurance, and had to figure out how to come up with at least $700 per month for treatment.

“I sold everything I could think of to sell,” she said. “I’d literally fast so I could save enough money for my chemo.”

Spirtos’ story is all too common—and that’s why the Desert Cancer Foundation exists. The nonprofit was founded in 1994 by Cory Teichner, Arthur Teichner and Dr. Sebastian George, and since then has helped many thousands of cancer patients who are uninsured, underinsured or otherwise lacking funds to pay for their care. Today, cancer-survivor Spirtos is in a much better place; in fact, she works for the Desert Cancer Foundation as its director of donor development.

October is going to be a busy month for Spirtos and the rest of the folks involved with the Desert Cancer Foundation, because it's National Breast Cancer Awareness Month.

The foundation, with some help from the Miramonte Resort and Spa, is kicking off the month a little early: From 5 to 8 p.m., Thursday, Sept. 26, the Miramonte will launch “Think Pink,” a month-long series of events and specials, during which some of the proceeds will be donated to the Desert Cancer Foundation.

The launch party will include a fountain commemoration, live music and specialty pink cocktails. Through October, the Vineyard Lounge will offer those special pink drinks, and each Thursday, Gina Carey will perform, and donate $5 of each CD she sells. The WELL Spa will offer special “Think Pink” treatments, and the Miramonte will accept donations for the foundation at the front desk.

Of course, the Desert Cancer Foundation has more big plans for National Breast Cancer Awareness Month.

On Saturday, Oct. 12, El Paseo in Palm Desert will be the site of one of the Desert Cancer Foundation’s biggest events: Paint El Paseo Pink. Through Oct. 5, individuals and teams can register online to participate for about $25 per person; on-site registration begins at 8:30 a.m., Saturday, Oct. 12, with the walk starting with an opening ceremony at 9:30. The foundation, with the help of the Desert Healthcare District, hopes to raise at least $150,000 at the event, and some El Paseo businesses are getting involved; for example, Spirtos praised Brighton Collectibles for holding a special “Girlfriends Day” from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., during which some of the proceeds will go to Paint El Paseo Pink.

However, raising money is not the only goal of the event.

“We’d like to raise awareness for people to get screenings,” Spirtos said. “Not just women; men can contract breast cancer as well.”

Spirtos said she’s proud of the fact that thanks to the support of local sponsors and the medical community, the Desert Cancer Foundation arranges $7 in services for every dollar donated.

“It’s wonderful to have people coming together to support the foundation,” Spirtos said.

For more information on the Desert Cancer Foundation, or to register for Paint El Paseo Pink, visit desertcancerfoundation.org. For more on the Miramonte Resort and Spa, visit www.miramonteresort.com.