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Sun08182019

Last updateTue, 18 Sep 2018 1pm

On this week's provocative Independent comics page: The K Chronicles ponders the infamous "Asian Girlz" video; Jen Sorenson tackles the "Obamacare" silence battle; Red Meat fears those who are obsessed with blood; and The City raises the terror-alert level.

Published in Comics

As with a lot of other families living in the eastern Coachella Valley, when one of our family members fell sick, it meant driving about 100 miles across the border into Mexico, to the city of Mexicali, to get taken care of by a doctor.

The only other option, it seemed, was not being taken care of at all.

Now, because of health-care reform efforts in the United States, young people growing up today in the eastern Coachella Valley—the unincorporated rural communities of southern Riverside County—don’t need to go without health insurance the way I did. The scenario is finally beginning to change. At least it can change—if people here are made aware of the health services now available to them through federal health-care reform, right in their own community.

“We owe it to our country to inform the citizens to take advantage of all these resources that are available,” said Ronnie Cho, associate director of public engagement for the White House, during a speech about health care reform that I attended in Washington, D.C., as a reporter in April.

Cho is right. For the Affordable Care Act (ACA) to make a difference, people need to first be aware that health care is an option for them. People need to know that they can afford to visit a doctor, without having to stray more than a few miles away from their home.

When my family would go visit relatives across the border in Mexicali, we always took advantage of the opportunity to stop by the Mexican pharmacy to buy medicine for ourselves, as well as for our friends and neighbors who always requested some. As a child, I thought those trips to Mexicali to visit the doctor were the only way—it was just what people did—until later on in my youth, when my father got a job with a new trucking business that gave him medical benefits that included family coverage. Because my dad worked for a lot of different trucking companies during the years, and because there were lengths of time when he was unemployed, our health-care situation was never stable. for those few years, my family and I received the best health care we’d ever had.

“Young people are relatively healthy, so they think, ‘I don’t need health care,’ until something happens, and they actually need it,” said Cho.

Again, Cho got it right. I can remember my worried mother, back in 2008, telling my little sister and me that we once again did not have health insurance and would have to resume our trips to Mexicali.

In retrospect, I never minded the long trips to the doctor or dentist’s office. In fact, I never worried about my health. My parents always had medicine from Mexicali available in our cabinets for emergencies. For my siblings and me, it was not something that got in the way; it was something that we believed had to be done, because there was no cheaper option.

The irony is that even though being uninsured felt normal to me and my siblings growing up, it is families like ours who need that insurance the most. Families like mine who live in the unincorporated communities of the eastern Coachella Valley—most of us are Latino; many (like my parents) are immigrants; and many make a living as farm workers or do some other type of physical labor—are especially in need of the protections provided by health insurance, because of occupational hazards and other health risks associated with living in an area where people lack money and resources.

The Affordable Care Act, the bulk of which will be implemented on Jan. 1, 2014, is helping families like mine take control of our medical insurance, by providing options and a sense of security. It’s an idea—health-care security—that at one time, at least for my family, seemed impossible to imagine. The health insurance that for so long seemed like such a special privilege will now become available to more people than ever before.

The ACA was put into place in part to make sure insurance companies cannot end your coverage plan when you need it the most, cannot bill you into debt, and cannot discriminate due to pre-existing medical conditions.

Among other provisions, the ACA will secure medical insurance for American citizens after getting laid off or changing jobs. It will require insurance companies to cover the cost of mammograms and cancer screenings. And for the first time, young adults will remain eligible to be covered under their parent’s or guardian’s health-insurance plan through the age of 26, even if they are married.

As a result, 3.1 million young adults are now covered along with their families, and more than 107,000 Americans with pre-existing conditions who didn’t previously have insurance are now receiving health coverage, according to federal data.

If you know where to look, it is free and simple to apply for affordable or no-cost medical insurance programs such as Medicaid and the Childrens’ Health Insurance Program (CHIP), which cover medical services that include doctor check-ups, emergency care, hospital care, vaccinations, prescription drugs, vision, hearing and dental.

There was a time for a lot of us living here in the eastern Coachella Valley when driving across the border seemed like the easiest and most-affordable way to access health care. Fortunately, for many of us, that no longer needs to be the case. Our communities can have the security of health insurance that for so long seemed just beyond our reach, if we just know where to find it.

To see if you qualify for Medicaid or CHIP, or to apply online, visit insurekidsnow.gov. To find out what is your best insurance option for your specific demographics and needs go to finder.healthcare.gov.

Alejandra Alarcon is a reporter for Coachella Unincorporated, a youth media startup in the east Coachella Valley, funded by the Building Healthy Communities Initiative of the California Endowment and operated by New America Media in San Francisco. The purpose is to report on issues in the community that can bring about change. “Coachella Unincorporated” refers to the region youth journalists cover, but also to the unincorporated communities of the Eastern Valley with the idea to “incorporate” the East Valley into the mainstream Coachella Valley mindset. For more information, visit coachellaunincorporated.org.

Published in Community Voices

It began when Joshua Ellis could no longer spit.

The blockage in his saliva gland resulted in swelling, and the pain forced him—a freelance web designer and writer—to visit a place that 50 million Americans who lack insurance coverage know too well: the emergency room. Finally, after hours of waiting, waves of guilt washing over him as a rising tide of heart-attacked, bullet-riddled and generally worse-off souls gurneyed inside to meet their fates, he received an X-ray.

What it revealed would lead Ellis 700 miles away into the Mexican city of Juarez and into the inscrutable mystery of the preserved heart of a baby vampire. To put it to a point, his teeth were killing him—specifically, his severely impacted wisdoms, which his skull had grown around. The teeth threatened to pierce his sinus cavity. Left unaddressed, they would likely break his jaw and possibly stab his brain.

In other words, Ellis’ new ebook, An American Vampire in Juarez: Getting My Teeth Pulled in Mexico’s Most Notorious Border Town (nsfwcorp.com, $2.99), is hardly your average trip-to-see-the-dentist tale. It’s a sordid, noir-esque memoir of how the richest country in the world fails to take care of its own and offers a vivid, no-holds-barred snapshot of the border relationship between the U.S. and Mexico. (Disclosure: Ellis and I worked together at Las Vegas CityLife almost 10 years ago, along with Independent head honcho Jimmy Boegle.)

In a civilized country like, say, oh, Canada, a death panel would convene to decide the best moment for Ellis’ grey matter to be lacerated by his own tusks and for his organs to be harvested to benefit Islamist militants needing donations. Kidding. In any other First World nation, Ellis would simply have made an appointment. In the U.S., he lacked coverage, and couldn’t afford treatment, so he did nothing. Luckily he landed a gig with a military contractor and months later met with an HMO dentist in a Vegas clinic sandwiched between a Food 4 Less and a smoke shop.

That’s when this Hellraiser-grade tell-all really gets under way: The Vegas dentist can only remove Ellis’ lower wisdoms and suggest an oral surgeon for the uppers. What the American clinic inflicts on the writer is absurd. The doctor calls him fat and leaves his lower mandible riddled with fragments and a serious abscess. Months later the healed socket still issues chunks of bone.

This is all before Ellis, 34 and married, decides to become a medical tourist in a city recognized as the world’s murder capital. Where rival drug cartels rack up massive body counts over turf and the only good journalist, foreign or not, is a dead one. Using El Paso as base and clandestinely armed with several unusual “pigstickers,” he moves across the border and back—carefully. Like a hyper-vigilant Hunter S. Thompson with chops rot, Ellis delivers darkly hilarious descriptions, as when a Juarez hooker solicits him.

A tiny woman steps away from a baby stroller and approaches me. She looks exactly like what would happen if Rosie Perez played the part of Gozer the Gozerian in a downmarket version of Ghostbusters. She’s got a bulldog jaw, a bizarre pompadour/mullet, and a white outfit that looks like something Juice Newton left in a Dumpster after a show in 1982. The general effect is disturbing.

 

It’s not entirely a freak show. Ultimately, his treatment at the hands of an Anglo doctor and his staff provides an interesting contrast to what Ellis endured in Vegas. I don’t want to give away what happens—hint: it’s terrifying and not for the faint-hearted. Suffice to say the author ends up spooking coyotes with a mouthful of blood while crossing the border and then contemplating a mummified pawnshop curiosity in El Paso. (The symbolism is rife with political meanings.) Along the way Ellis instructs the reader, breaking everything down, from maquiladoras to right-wing hysteria over Obamacare to pricing on (and clientele) for oral surgery in Mexico.

Vampire is the closest thing to a how-to guide for those of us who are uninsured and considering a trip for affordable care. At 20,000 words, the book is a brisk read and Ellis a riveting guide into a realm few have documented so compellingly. Perhaps more significantly, if you’re someone who makes resolutions to floss regularly and fails, this first-person account of medical travails will scare you straight and clean.

An American Vampire in Juarez by Joshua Ellis is available in Kindle, Nook and ePub formats.

Published in Literature

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