CVIndependent

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Last updateTue, 18 Sep 2018 1pm

On this week's weekly Independent comics page, which could be fired by Donald Trump at any moment: The K Chronicles checks in with Republican Sen. Jerry Mandering; This Modern World examines a confederacy of sociopaths; Jen Sorenson hails the freedom to be screwed; Red Meat needs to use the bathroom; and Apoca Clips looks in on the shenanigans of Lil' Trumpy.

Published in Comics

On this week's grossly overbooked weekly Independent comics page: Red Meat tries to build a better mousetrap; Apoca Clips ponders Syria; Jen Sorenson looks at a double-standard regarding the treatment of children; The K Chronicles tells a story about how just one teacher can make a difference; and This Modern World examines life during wartime.

Published in Comics

On this week's spied-upon-via-microwave weekly Independent comics page: The K Chronicles engages in a bit of shameless self-promotion; This Modern World looks back at Donald Trump's campaign promises; Jen Sorenson compares Obamacare and Trumpcare; and Red Meat gets ready to embark on a new career.

Published in Comics

On this week's heavily wiretapped weekly Independent comics page: This Modern World brings us more adventures of the Unbelievable Baby-Man; Jen Sorenson shows how taking away health-care funding can improve poor people's health; The K Chronicles tells a tale about the wife; and Red Meat eavesdrops on Papa Moai's visit to the Tobacco Shack.

Published in Comics

On this week's leaked weekly Independent comics page: Red Meat discusses God's own image with the deity himself; Jen Sorenson looks at GOP alternatives to Obamacare; The K Chronicles goes to the movies; and This Modern World learns that all those right-wing claims about President Obama were actually true!

Published in Comics

If you live in the Coachella Valley, you may receive a phone call sometime early next year from a nonprofit called HARC—Health Assessment and Research for Communities.

HARC’s new board president, Bruce Purdy, says it’s vital for you to take that call, and answer all of the survey questions that follow—even if the questioning is lengthy and a bit tedious.

“The data we’ll collect will ultimately support and improve the health and well-being of the residents of the Coachella Valley,” he said. “It will provide an objective picture of the health of citizens in this community, and help create programs and policies that will help improve health of a whole lot of residents.”

It’s HARC’s job to conduct this survey of residents every three years, and then compile and release the results.

So, why’s it so important to have this data?

“We believe that in the last five years, grants have provided roughly $12.8 million in support to local nonprofits that used HARC data to justify their requests,” Purdy said.

It’s Purdy’s experience with one of those nonprofits, the Desert AIDS Project, that led Purdy—a semi-retired development economist—to get involved with HARC. Purdy sits on the Desert AIDS Project’s board, and saw how helpful HARC’s data was to DAP.

“We’ve gotten so many grants because (we) have really good, analytical data (from HARC),” he said.

David Brinkman, the CEO of DAP, encouraged Purdy to join the HARC board, Purdy said. Dr. Glen Grayman, the chief population health officer and regional medical director of Borrego Health, had been the president of HARC’s board since it was founded in 2006, and oversaw the first three HARC surveys. When Grayman decided it was time to hand over the reins to someone else, Purdy was tasked with becoming that someone else. Purdy became the HARC board president in October.

The last HARC survey, conducted in 2013, showed the Coachella Valley’s collective health badly needed improvement. It showed a third of local adults between the ages of 18 and 64 didn’t have insurance. The data also showed high rates of hypertension, high cholesterol and binge-drinking, and that cancer rates and the number of children living in poverty were on the rise.

Of course, a lot has changed in the last three years. The economy has improved, and the Affordable Care Act has given more adults access to reasonably priced insurance plans. Purdy said he’s curious what the 2016 numbers will show.

“I’m really interested to see if the increase in people covered by Obamacare has helped, hurt or not changed at all the health and wellness of people in the valley,” he said.

Purdy said HARC is “inundated” with requests from nonprofits for various questions to be included in the survey. He said the 2016 survey will include deeper questions regarding two matters on different ends of the age spectrum: childhood obesity/early-onset diabetes; and the various health issues the valley’s older snowbird population is facing.

Purdy said the survey includes about 160 questions, and that he hopes to get more responses than the 2,000-plus received during the 2013 survey. Kent State University will again conduct the survey.

“We are very proud of and excited about the work we do,” Purdy said.

For more information, visit www.harcdata.org.

Published in Local Issues

On this week's tingly Independent comics page: The K Chronicles ponders a U.S. Open low point; This Modern World looks at the concerns of conservatives; Jen Sorenson does some kneejerkin'; and Red Meat enjoys some root beer.

Published in Comics

Many Republicans predicted that the Affordable Care Act, aka “Obamacare,” would send this country into utter chaos.

Of course, this didn’t happen. Nonetheless, there is murmuring among a few 2016 Republican presidential candidates that repealing the ACA would be one of the first things they’d do if elected. But in reality, the plan is working so well that it would be political suicide to try to repeal it at this point—and I am one of the millions of Americans who have benefited from the plan.

On July 3, 2014, I was diagnosed with a detached retina. A blow to the back of the head a week earlier and two subsequent airplane rides caused the injury. I was in South Bend, Ind., meeting my partner’s family for the first time, when I got the news. I was given a choice: I could have surgery in Indiana, and be forbidden to fly for six weeks (not an option), or fly home to Palm Springs as soon as possible and have surgery there. A detached retina is a serious situation, and time is of the essence, but since my retina was already completely detached, the doctor said a few days would not make much of a difference.

I was barely absorbing this information, since I was pretty much hysterical. Thank God for my partner, Eric, who calmly took control of the situation. It was after 5 p.m. on Thursday, July 3, the day before a major holiday. The office was closing up, and the janitor was vacuuming the carpet. Luckily, the ophthalmologist I had seen was kind enough to stay until we could make the arrangements. I will never forget the sight of Eric sitting on the floor, urgently trying to get through to someone in the Inland Empire Health Plan office in Palm Springs to set up an appointment ASAP. Fortunately, he got through.

We flew back to the desert on Saturday night, saw the IEHP folks on Sunday, and met with the surgeon on Monday; I had the surgery on Thursday, July 10. A series of miracles, to be sure.

My surgery—a vitrectomy—involved removing the liquid from the eye and inserting a gas bubble in the eyeball, which then pressed the retina back into place. The rehab is ghastly—six weeks of sleeping face-down on a special cut-out pillow—and keeping your head down at all times. Yes, at all times. That includes sitting, standing, walking, showering—everything, so that gravity can do its work.

I was a dutiful patient, and followed directions to the letter. Thankfully, the outcome was good: The vision in my left eye is at 99.9 percent, and will likely keep improving. Another miracle.

None of this would have happened if Eric and I had not received health insurance coverage from the Affordable Care Act, just two months before all this occurred. Eric and I are both professional performers, but we also have “job jobs” to pay the bills. He had just been hired to sell Steinways for SoCal Pianos in San Marcos, and I work part-time as the activities assistant at a local senior health care facility. Neither of us could afford health insurance before the advent of “Obamacare.”

In addition to my surgery, I had to fill five or six different prescriptions for eye drops (some of which I am still using more than a year later); go through cataract surgery the following January; and endure many, many follow-up appointments. My total out-of-pocket expense has been $30—to rush some lab work. Had I not had “Obamacare,” there is no question I would now be blind in my left eye. A friend of mine has a cousin who suffered a detached retina and did not have insurance. He lost his sight.

Of course, there are thousands of people like me who made it through catastrophic injury or illness because of the Affordable Care Act. Like 58-year-old Kathy Bentzoni of Slatington, Pa., who got a life-saving transfusion after being diagnosed with a rare blood disorder. Her previous insurance company called it a pre-existing condition and denied her coverage. Or 41-year-old Mike O’Dell of Kansas, who received a new heart after his heart developed an infection. His old health plan would not cover the $4,000 a month for anti-rejection medicine following the transplant.

Those who still disparage the ACA are ignoring the facts. According to a 2014 article in the Los Angeles Times, nearly 10 million previously uninsured people now have health care coverage because of the ACA. The nonprofit Rand Corp. indicates that fewer than a million people who had health plans in 2013 are now uninsured—and that’s because their plans were canceled for not meeting new standards set by the law. Fox News personality Juan Williams says half of those people can get better coverage for a lower price, and some will even get subsidies to help them pay for it. What the ACA basically did was put in place consumer protection so that health insurance companies could no longer take advantage of people by giving them crappy coverage.

It’s important to remember what insurance companies can no longer do because of the ACA: They can no longer cancel your policy if you get sick, deny you coverage or charge you more for a pre-existing condition, or impose lifelong caps on your health coverage. The ACA also mandates that your insurance company must pay for the ambulance ride if you are rushed to the hospital. Those are long-overdue, positive changes—so what’s all the fuss about?

So the next time you hear someone railing against “Obamacare,” think about the millions of people who now have access to healthcare who once did not. Think about Kathy Bentzoni and Mike O’Dell.

I will. And I will be filled with gratitude that I can today see a beautiful desert sunrise—with both eyes.

Published in Community Voices

On this week's straining-to-be-memorable Independent comics page: Red Meat has problems sleeping in a new bed; Jen Sorenson ponders the right's rights; The K Chronicles begs people to stop the hate; and This Modern World pays tribute to Jeb Bush.

Published in Comics

On this week's moving Independent comics page: Jen Sorenson wishes she could use her bike more; The K Chronicles wonders if some right-wing converts are for real; This Modern World enjoys the presidential-primary process; and Red Meat gets a special message from God.

Published in Comics

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