CVIndependent

Fri12062019

Last updateTue, 18 Sep 2018 1pm

April is, in my mind, the weirdest month of the year in the Coachella Valley.

April is a series of contradictions. It’s the craziest month of the year in terms of visitors, thanks to Coachella, Stagecoach, The Dinah and the White Party … yet the snowbirds are starting to leave, and we know May will all of a sudden bring relative calm (and blazing heat). The hotels are all full … yet during Coachella, in the west valley, the nights are fairly quiet.

Here at the Independent, if it’s April, that means it’s time for our annual Music Issue, and that means Brian Blueskye has been crazy-busy working on all of our extra coverage. This year’s issue, however, is a little different from previous Music Issues: Rather than focusing exclusively on the two big festivals, Brian decided to tie things to the local music scene, including the increasing popularity of Latin music. Read all of Brian’s fantastic coverage in the print edition and/or here at CVIndependent.com in the upcoming days.

Our coverage, of course, isn’t all about music; as always, our great columns, news stories, food coverage and arts writing are here, too—and I’d like to draw your attention to one story in particular, because it’s near and dear to my heart.

A couple of weeks ago, we published a story from our partners at CALmatters about the mental-health crisis in California. At the heart of the story is the heartbreaking tale of Elizabeth Brown, a brilliant, gifted college student who killed herself last year. The piece, in gut-wrenching detail, illustrates how our medical system often fails to properly care for people dealing with mental illness, and examines (so far futile) efforts by the state government to fix the problem.

This story hits close to home for me, because I suffer from depression. (What I have to deal with, thank goodness, pales in comparison to the severe problems Elizabeth Brown had.) My life serves as a perfect example of the insidiousness of depression and other mental illnesses: On the outside, things are going well for me. I have an amazing husband, great friends, an exciting social life and a rewarding career with purpose. Yet there are days when it takes every ounce of willpower I have to get going.

I bring this all up not because of me—I am fine, thanks to an amazing support structure, the fact that my illness is not that severe, and access to medication if needed—but because of you: If you often feel down, or anxious, or if you tend to isolate yourself, please get help. Talk to someone. If things get really bad, please use the resources mentioned at the end of the aforementioned story.

If you don’t feel down or anxious … well, someone you love probably does feel that way. Make sure you’re there for your depressed friends and loved ones—and understand that depression often just happens, no matter how things seem to be going in a depressed person’s life. Like I said, mental illness really is insidious.

As always, thanks for reading the Coachella Valley Independent. Email me with any feedback you may have, and be sure to pick up the April print edition, hitting newsstands this week.

Published in Editor's Note

It was late in the afternoon on Saturday, March 17. I was in San Francisco for a fantastic LGBT business conference, which had just wrapped up. My husband, Garrett—who spends most of his time in San Francisco due to work—and I had decided to take in a movie, and then get some Chinese food afterward, before I headed back to Palm Springs the next morning.

We were hurrying to the 4:30 p.m. showing of Love, Simon, at the Metreon. We were crossing Fourth Street, rushing to get across before the light changed. That’s when I stepped in a small rut in the road, lost my balance and tried to catch myself.

I failed.

I put out my arms to brace myself, and then took a literal tumble toward the sidewalk, coming to a stop just short of the gutter. As I started to get up, Garrett asked me if I was OK. That was when I realized my left forearm was pointing in the wrong direction.

“I don’t think so,” I said.

After Garrett and some passers-by helped me onto a bench, Garrett called 911, as I cradled my left arm with my right. After an excruciatingly long wait—toward the end of it, Garrett actually ordered a Lyft, fearing an ambulance would never come—paramedics finally arrived. I was loaded into the ambulance and taken to Saint Francis Memorial Hospital.

Fortunately, I have good insurance, and I received good care. After X-rays—the most painful experience I’ve ever endured—I was diagnosed with a left elbow dislocation. (Such dislocations are rare, apparently; normally, the bones just break.) After a procedure to put my arm back in place—during which, thankfully, I was anesthetized—my arm was placed in a splint and sling, and I was sent on my way.

I mention all of this, because this occurred just before we began production on the April print issue—our annual Music Issue, one of our biggest editorial issues of the year.

Last week, I edited and designed the bulk of the issue with just one arm. It was not easy. However, we were able to get it done for two reasons: First, I am blessed with an amazing group of friends, family members, coworkers and teammates, who constantly reached out to make sure I was OK. Thanks to all of you; you know who you are.

Second … there was no way in hell I was going to allow the issue to be curtailed or delayed in anyway—because it’s a damn good issue.

I must tip my figurative hat (with my right arm, of course) to Brian Blueskye, who not only churned out his usual impressive collection of great music interviews and stories; he also penned a terrific news story, about the businesses affected by a March 7 fire on Arenas Road in downtown Palm Springs.

I could go on and on … but instead, I’ll let you go check out all of the great stuff from the issue—much of which has already been posted, and the rest of which will be posted in the coming days.

As always, thanks for reading the Coachella Valley Independent. Contact me with any questions or comments, and be sure to pick up the April 2018 print edition, hitting the streets this week.

Published in Editor's Note

A few weeks back, a fantastic discussion ignited in one of the alternative-newsmedia e-mail groups to which I belong. The topic was readership campaigns—advertising campaigns by newspapers to promote themselves to their own readers.

Some of the slogans being used in these campaigns are brilliant—especially the ones created by our friends at The Austin Chronicle in Texas.

You need us. We need you. Support free press. Read us, follow us, advertise with us.

No news is bad news. We need each other.

Truth is truth. Whether you like them or not, facts aren’t fake. We report the news at no cost to you, and no matter the cost to us.

We here at the Independent will be, uh, “borrowing” some of these ideas (with The Austin Chronicle’s blessing, of course).

These truly are unprecedented times in which we’re living. The attacks on the press by the Trump administration are simply shocking. Beyond the insults and slights, Trump and other members of his administration are picking and choosing which reporters get basic access—of course, less-critical media sources get dibs—that is, if any reporters get access.

(The same thing happens on the local level. We recently reached out to Palm Springs Mayor Rob Moon to talk about the downtown redevelopment project and its current entanglements; we got a response from the city PR person saying Moon and other city officials were not giving any interviews regarding the criminal proceedings involving the downtown redevelopment project. Three weeks later, Moon and others sat down with KMIR for a special regarding these very topics. Apparently, Moon and the city PR folks feared what types of questions we’d ask. Read more here.)

On the positive side, these unprecedented times have forced many media sources to drop the outdated, dishonest myth of “objectivity,” and instead start calling, as the saying goes, a spade a spade. It’s been downright refreshing to see CNN, The New York Times and other mainstream media sources start calling lies, well, lies. Sometimes, there is no “other side” to a story. Truth is truth. Whether you like them or not, facts aren’t fake.

As another of those Austin Chronicle ads says … we really do need you. Without our readers, the Independent is just paper or pixels. I hope you feel like you need us, too. Please, tell your friends about us. Give us feedback. Support our advertisers—and tell them you saw their ad in the Independent. And if you’re feeling particularly generous, please go to CVIndependent.com/Supporters and sign up for our Supporters of the Independent program.

The April 2017 print edition of the Coachella Valley Independent—our special Music Issue—is hitting streets valley-wide this week. As always, thanks for reading, and don’t hesitate to contact me.

Published in Editor's Note

April is going to be one helluva month in the Coachella Valley.

I came to this somewhat obvious conclusion after a marathon editing and compiling session, during which I perused tens of thousands of words of copy—much of which details how and why, exactly, April is going to be so amazing.

First up: music. Brian Blueskye has been hard at work over the last month-plus, doing interviews, gathering information and writing his butt off in preparation for our special print Music Issue. The result: four profiles on bands playing at Coachella; two profiles on Stagecoach bands; stories on other bands not to miss at both Coachella and Stagecoach; and a rundown of information on Coachella-related parties occurring before and during the festival. He also did two Lucky 13 interviews, as well as his normal monthly Blueskye Report. All of this music coverage, by the way, is fantastic; some of it is already online at CVIndependent.com, and the rest of it will appear within the next week or so.

If you’re a music-lover, and you see Brian around town during the month of April, you should really buy him a drink for keeping you so well-informed.

Next up: everything else that’s going on around the Coachella Valley—and there is a lot going on, much of which is detailed in a brand-new feature we’ve added to the Independent: monthly events listings from ArtsOasis, the creative-resource center that’s a project of the Coachella Valley Economic Partnership. Head on over to ArtsOasis.org, and you can peruse a fantastic events calendar that contains all sorts of great information—or you can just look in our Arts & Culture section for a selection of these listings, which have been edited and compiled by the Independent staff. (Don’t see your event included in the ArtsOasis calendar? Head to the website and submit the information, dang it!)

And now, back to music: The Independent is proud to be sponsoring a great April event that benefits a fantastic cause. The Pre-Coachella Warehouse Party is taking place at Coachella Valley Brewing Co. in Thousand Palms from 3 to 8 p.m., Saturday, April 5. The party will feature two stages of DJ music, live art, yummy food and, of course, great beer. In fact, you’ll get four beers along with your $35 admission fee; click here to buy tickets. Proceeds from the event will go to EcoMedia Compass, a group that wants to save the Salton Sea by promoting awareness of the sea, the problems it is facing, and potential solutions. (Props to my friend Alex Harrington, aka All Night Shoes, for being one of the party’s organizers.)

Yep. April’s going to be a truly special month for the Coachella Valley. Let’s get it started, shall we?

Published in Editor's Note