CVIndependent

Thu11262020

Last updateMon, 24 Aug 2020 12pm

Today was one of the biggest COVID-19-related news days in quite a while, so let’s get right to the links:

Reopening processes around the country—and in some parts of California—are coming to a halt or being reversed, due to increasing COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations. In Texas and Florida, bars are being closed, and other business are being restricted.

San Francisco was planning on allowing hair salons, outdoor bars and other businesses to open on Monday. That move has been delayed indefinitely.

• And most worrisome locally: For the first time since the reopening process began, the state has told a county that it needs to re-impose a strict stay-at-home order—Imperial County, our neighbors to the southeast. And another neighboring county, San Bernardino, is close to running out of non-surge hospital beds

Riverside County is behind the curve at hiring contact tracers. The good news is that as of yesterday, the county was up to 220 of them, with 180 added in the last five weeks, according to the Riverside Press-Enterprise. However, the state says we need around 375 of them.

• Dr. Anthony Fauci said the federal government is considering a new way of testing for SARS-CoV-2—pool testing. “The approach works this way: Samples from, say, 20 people are combined into a single pool,” reports The Washington Post. “One coronavirus test is used on the entire pool. If the test comes back negative, researchers know they can move on to another pool of samples. If it comes back positive, only then would each individual be tested.

A Tucson emergency room doctor penned a column for The New York Times with this headline: “I’m a Health Care Worker. You Need to Know How Close We Are to Breaking.”

• While the state-by-state numbers here are probably too small to take too seriously … a recent Axios/Ipsos poll shows that 64 percent of Californians wear masks whenever they go outthe second highest percentage behind New York.

• A JPMorgan study shows a correlation between restaurant spending and the spread of the coronavirus, according to CNBC—and, conversely, “higher spending at supermarkets predicts a slower spread of the virus.” However, experts point out that this doesn’t necessarily mean restaurants are to blame for the spread.

• Also according to CNBC: The number of homeowners delaying their monthly mortgage payments is on the rise again, after falling for several weeks.

Can you shop safely in a brick-and-mortar clothing store? Esquire talked to some experts to get answers. Key quote from Erin Bromage, associate professor of biology and immunology at the University of Massachusetts: “It comes down to how long you spend in the store and how many people are in the store. If you are only in there for a short period of time, and they’re restricting occupancy, then the risk is low.”

From our partners at CalMatters, via the Independent: University of California campuses are telling students to prepare for a fall semester that will mostly—but not entirely—take place online.

• We’re now moving to our WTF?! portion of the digest, starting with the news that American Airlines is going to stop keeping middle seats open, and resume booking flights to capacity.

• It’s not often that I’ve wanted to tip my hat to Dick Cheney, but here we are: He says that real men wear face masks.

• Did you know North Carolina has an anti-mask law? It’s true—and it’s caused no small degree of confusion. It turns out the law is a decades-old measure meant to crack down on the KKK—but thankfully, it’s been temporarily suspended, at least through Aug. 1.

• Finally, this story is particularly devastating news to those of us here at Independent World Headquarters: Costco has stopped making half-sheet cakes. DAMN YOU ’RONA! DAMN YOU!!!

• No … we take back that “finally”; we can’t end the week on that awful note. So here’s some good news: San Francisco’s Transgender District was “the first legally recognized district in the world dedicated to a historically transgender community.” The economic downturn almost forced the nonprofit to close—but then came the Black Lives Matter protests. Now, the Transgender District is on firmer footing, as “the two movements have converged in a kind of intersectional synchronicity that is bringing renewed attention to the realities of transgender people of color,” reports the San Francisco Chronicle.

Readers, these are scary times. Please, take care of yourself this weekend. Wear a mask when you go out. Check in on neighbors and loved ones. Live in the now and enjoy life, because these days still count against the total number you have on this planet. Right? Oh, and help out the Independent, if you’re able, by becoming a Supporter of the Independent. The Daily Digest will return Monday.

Published in Daily Digest

There’s this story I’ve been obsessing over lately. It’s equal parts hilarious, pathetic and infuriating. It’s an example of how indefensibly awful governmental decision-making can be—and more important, emblematic of how institutional white supremacy can be so pervasive.

This is happening in my backyard—North Carolina—so let me get you up to speed. There are two things you should know about my state: Like other Southern states, we have an odious legacy on race—slavery, secession, the Wilmington coup of 1898, segregation, “urban renewal,” Jesse Helms, the whole deal. Unlike other Southern states, however, we have a mostly progressive education legacy, centered on the oldest publicly chartered university in the country, the University of North Carolina.

Our story begins where these two threads converge. In 1913, the United Daughters of the Confederacy donated a monument to UNC. At its commemoration, Civil War veteran and local businessman Julian Carr—there’s a town named for him a few miles down the road—fondly recalled the time he “horse-whipped a negro wench until her skirts hung in shreds.”

The statue, depicting a Confederate soldier, became known as Silent Sam and stood there for 105 years, until protesters toppled it in August 2018. In January, UNC-Chapel Hill’s outgoing chancellor—she’d given her notice that day—had its base removed. The monument was stashed away, and that was that.

Or so everyone thought. But let me back up.

Silent Sam had been the target of protests for decades, but things heated up a few years ago. After white-supremacist Dylann Roof murdered nine black people in South Carolina, and Southern states began reconsidering their Confederate symbolism, North Carolina’s right-wing General Assembly passed a law in 2015 barring the removal of Confederate monuments. Two years later, after neo-Nazis marched in Charlottesville, protesters in Durham ripped one down anyway. That fueled the fire around Silent Sam.

For a year, the demonstrations became increasingly tense: There were protests and counter-protests, cops and tear gas, white supremacists and neo-Confederates. The statue turned into a PR nightmare for UNC. By the time it came down, almost everyone on campus was glad to see it go.

That wasn’t the case with UNC’s Board of Governors, however. The BOG, which manages the 17-campus UNC System, is appointed by the General Assembly. So when the General Assembly took a hard right turn in 2011, so did the BOG. And when UNC-Chapel Hill’s chancellor removed Silent Sam’s base in January, the BOG promptly removed her, months ahead of her scheduled departure. Several members insisted that Sam be returned to his former home—the hell with what students and faculty thought.

As it happens, neo-Confederates felt the same way. And here’s where things get weird.

Jump ahead to Nov. 27, the day before Thanksgiving, when, out of the blue, UNC announced that it had reached a “settlement” with the North Carolina division of the Sons of Confederate Veterans over the disposition of Silent Sam. This was strange, considering no one could recall the SCV filing a lawsuit over the statue. Stranger still were the terms of the deal: Not only did the neo-Confederate group get custody of the monument; it was also going to receive $2.5 million to build a facility to house it.

Yes: a $2.5 million gift from the state to an organization that romanticizes and mythologizes the slave-holding South, with the money specifically going to further spread those racist myths. That seemed bad. It soon got worse.

By the weekend, we’d learned that the SCV’s lawsuit, UNC’s answer, and the consent decree—i.e., the settlement—had all been filed within minutes of each other. By Monday, we’d discovered that UNC’s interim president and the BOG chairman had signed the consent decree days before the lawsuit was filed. And that’s not the best part.

An area attorney and former BOG member published a leaked message from the SCV’s “commander” to members detailing the group’s secret negotiations with UNC. I’ll gloss over the details, but here’s the gist: The SCV had been looking for a way to sue over Silent Sam since it was toppled, but the group found that it didn’t have a case. It didn’t even have the legal standing to sue. Nonetheless, when the BOG learned about the possibility of a lawsuit, it pre-emptively approached the neo-Confederates about a settlement. So long as Silent Sam didn’t end up back on UNC’s campus—too dangerous—UNC was willing to give the SCV whatever it wanted to avert a lawsuit that UNC knew it had no chance of losing.

I’ll note that UNC didn’t admit black students until the 1950s, and by 1963, it only had 18 black freshmen. The money it paid the SCV could cover the average debt of about 120 UNC graduates. Instead, it’s going toward a shrine for a treasonous white-supremacist insurrection.

So far, no one at the BOG has tried to defend this shit sandwich, but as best anyone can tell, they simply wanted the Silent Sam migraine to end. If it took paying Confederate fetishists a few million bucks to make that happen, so be it.

This is how institutionalized white supremacy works.

First, there was the presumption that objects meant to honor—not remember, but honor, which is what monuments do—those who fought to preserve chattel slavery should be protected by the state, and with it came an implicit message that the descendants of the slaves are worth less than the descendants of the soldiers who fought to keep them in chains.

Second, there was the failure to think about the moral implications of giving neo-Confederates money that could have helped disadvantaged communities or pay for scholarships or go literally anywhere else, knowing the money will further racist lies about the Lost Cause.

These considerations, if they were ever considered at all, were dismissed as unimportant. Because, to the white people making these decisions, they were.

Contact Jeffrey C. Billman at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Published in National/International

On this newly-released-by-the-FBI weekly Independent comics page: Jen Sorenson wishes the media covered climate change like it covers Hillary's emails; The K Chronicles enjoys residing in a swing state; This Modern World looks at the thing that ate America's brain; and Red Meat shares a tender childhood memory.

Published in Comics

On this week's high-fiber weekly Independent comics page: This Modern World listens in as The Donald gets advice from Putin; Jen Sorenson uncovers yet another Hillary Clinton "Scandal"; The K Chronicles tells the tale of two North Carolinas; and Red Meat deals with an inaccurate milk delivery.

Published in Comics

On this week's new and exciting weekly Independent comics page: Jen Sorenson examines a recent letter from the University of Chicago; The K Chronicles has a chat at Trader Joe's; This Modern World finds itself in a loop; and Red Meat returns from summer camp.

Published in Comics

On this week's toaster-oven-style weekly Independent comics page: Red Meat has issues with a sweet treat; Jen Sorenson takes some intelligence tests of our times; The K Chronicles examines the effects of the boycott on North Carolina; and This Modern World offers yet another installment of primary phenomena.

Published in Comics

On this week's unseasonably chilly weekly Independent comics page: The K Chronicles talks about North Carolina's creatures; Jen Sorenson shakes her head at more toddler shootings; This Modern World watches as The Incredible Trump runs amok; and Red Meat extends an offer of a coat.

Published in Comics

On this week's spritely Independent comics page: The K Chronicles is embarrassed by North Carolina; Jen Sorenson examines shell companies; This Modern World bitches about Bernie; and Red Meat's cowboys deal with a sorting issue.

Published in Comics

On this week's exciting Independent comics page: This Modern World deals with an alien invasion (but not very well); Jen Sorenson has a proposal for defenders of fracking; The K Chronicles packs up and moves cross-country; and Red Meat seeks some medicine, of sorts.

Published in Comics