CVIndependent

Wed11252020

Last updateMon, 24 Aug 2020 12pm

Happy Monday, everyone. I hope everyone out there had a fantastic weekend, despite the troubling nature of these times.

While my weekend had some lovely moments—a socially distanced patio dinner with friends being the highlight—I also spent a fair amount of time counting all of your votes in the first round of our Best of Coachella Valley readers’ poll. Well, all of that counting is complete, and I am happy to announce this year’s slate of fantastic finalists in 126 categories!

With that, voting is now under way in our final round of voting, which is taking place here through Oct. 26. As I’ve mentioned in this space before: We ask each reader to vote once, and only once, in each round. Whereas the goals of other “Best Of” polls in this town are to get their publications as much web traffic as possible from readers visiting their websites repeatedly to vote, our goal is to come up with the best slate of finalists and winners. So, please vote—but only once. And we’ll be watching IP addresses and verifying email addresses to cut down on the shenanigans.

Thanks to everyone who voted in the first round, and thanks in advance to all of you for voting in this final around. Oh, and congrats to all of our finalists; thanks for helping to make the Coachella Valley the amazing place that it is!

Today’s news:

• Unless you’ve been hiding in some sort of bunker for the last 24 hours, you’ve likely heard about the complete bombshell The New York Times dropped yesterday regarding Donald Trump’s taxes. The newspaper seems to have gotten Trump’s tax records—documents he’s long fought to kept out of the public’s eye—and they show a history of massive losses, suspect deductions and very little actual taxes paid. Most alarmingly, however, they show that the president has $421 million in debt coming due soon—which, as the speaker of the House pointed out today, raises security questions. It’s not hyperbole to say that this is one of the most important stories of the year. It’s also true that the revelations are unlikely to sway Trump devotees, given that previous unsavory revelations have failed to do so.

A series of wildfires in Sonoma and Napa counties have resulted in “significant loss,” according to the Los Angeles Times. Nearly 50,000 people face evacuations; the situation in wine country is beyond heartbreaking.

Donald Trump’s former campaign manager, Brad Parscale, was taken into custody yesterday in Fort Lauderdale, Fla., after he apparently threatened to kill himself. Parscale was fired as campaign manager in July but still worked for the campaign. According to The Washington Post: “The police were called by Parscale’s wife, Candice Parscale, who told the officers upon their arrival that ‘her husband was armed, had access to multiple firearms inside the residence and was threatening to harm himself.’ Parscale was in the house with 10 guns and was inebriated when the police arrived, according to a police report released Monday. His wife had escaped the house after he cocked a gun and threatened suicide, the report said. Her arms were bruised, and she told officers that her husband had hit her days earlier, according to the police report.”

• Efforts by Trump campaign donor and Postmaster General Louis DeJoy to “reform” the U.S. Postal Service by cutting costs and severely slowing mail delivery were dealt a blow by a federal judge today. According to the Los Angeles Times: “The U.S. Postal Service must prioritize election mail and immediately reverse changes that resulted in widespread delays in California and several other states, a federal judge ruled Monday. … The judge’s ruling came as part of a lawsuit by attorneys general for the District of Columbia and six states, including California, that accused the Trump administration of undermining the Postal Service by decommissioning high-speed mail-sorting machines, curtailing overtime and mandating that trucks run on time, which led to backlogs because mail was left behind.”

• Related is this scoop from Time magazine: “For three weeks in August, as election officials across the country were preparing to send out mail-in ballots to tens of millions of voters, the U.S. Postal Service stopped fully updating a national change of address system that most states use to keep their voter rolls current, according to multiple officials who use the system.” At least 1.8 million addresses (!) are effected.

• Oh, and then there’s this from NBC News: It turns out the USPS isn’t really keeping track of mail theft. “The Postal Service’s law enforcement arm acknowledged the shortcoming after NBC News, prompted by anecdotal accounts of an uptick in mail theft around the country, sought and received mail theft figures through a Freedom of Information Act request.

• Even though a federal judge has ordered the U.S. Census count to continue through Oct. 31, the bureau today said that Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross “has announced a target date of October 5, 2020 to conclude 2020 Census self-response and field data collection operations.” Hmm.

Politico over the weekend dropped a story with this frightening lede: “The (Health and Human Services) department is moving quickly on a highly unusual advertising campaign to ‘defeat despair’ about the coronavirus, a $300 million-plus effort that was shaped by a political appointee close to President Donald Trump and executed in part by close allies of the official, using taxpayer funds.” In journalism school, we were taught that this is called “propaganda.”

• Now let’s compare that story with this piece from CNBC: “The United States is ‘not in a good place’ as colder months loom and the number of newly reported coronavirus cases continues to swell beyond 40,000 people every day, White House coronavirus advisor Dr. Anthony Fauci said Monday.

Channel 4 News, out of the United Kingdom, reported today that it had obtained a “vast cache” of data used by Trump’s 2016 presidential campaign. What did that cache reveal? “It reveals that 3.5 million Black Americans were categorised by Donald Trump’s campaign as ‘Deterrence’—voters they wanted to stay home on election day. Tonight, civil rights campaigners said the evidence amounted to a new form of voter ‘suppression’ and called on Facebook to disclose ads and targeting information that has never been made public.”

According to NBC News: “A major hospital chain has been hit by what appears to be one of the largest medical cyberattacks in United States history. Computer systems for Universal Health Services, which has more than 400 locations, primarily in the U.S., began to fail over the weekend, and some hospitals have had to resort to filing patient information with pen and paper, according to multiple people familiar with the situation.” Eek! Locally, according to the UHS website, the company operates Michael’s House in Palm Springs.

The San Francisco Chronicle today became the latest newspaper to examine the troubling fact that a lot of people who have “recovered” from COVID-19 have not actually fully recovered. Key quote: “The coronavirus can infiltrate and injure multiple organs. Studies have reported lasting damage to the lungs and heart. People have suffered strokes due to coronavirus-related clotting issues. The virus can cause skin rashes and gastrointestinal problems. Some people lose their sense of smell and taste for weeks or even months.”

A political science professor, writing for The Conversation, explains a study he did that proves something fairly self-evident: “Politicians deepen existing divides when they use inflammatory language, such as hate speech, and this makes their societies more likely to experience political violence and terrorism. That’s the conclusion from a study I recently did on the connection between political rhetoric and actual violence.” Yes, Trump’s speeches are examined, as are those by other world leaders.

Finally, the Los Angeles Times issued an unprecedented and expansive self-examination of and apology for decades of systemic racism at the newspaper. It’s worth a read.

Stay safe, everyone. Please consider helping us continue producing local journalism—made available for free to everyone—by becoming a Supporter of the Independent, if you can. The Daily Digest will return Wednesday.

Published in Daily Digest

It’s time for Gov. Gavin Newsom and, if possible, the California Legislature to make the usage of face masks mandatory.

It’s time. We see what’s happening in other states—most notably our neighbors to the east—where hospitalizations continue to skyrocket. We also keep seeing science come out showing how stunningly effective the use of simple face masks can be in slowing the spread of SARS-CoV-2.

What else are we seeing? We’re seeing concerning local upticks in hospitalizations. We’re seeing local business owners—trying so hard to do the right thing—upset after influxes of customers, many of whom are from out of town, wandering in without wearing masks, in violation of local mask mandates.

We’re seeing local health officials fleeing from their jobs due to public and political pushback—including death threats. And we don’t even have the words to describe the hostile insanity going on in Orange County.

The verdict is in: Masks work. Masks could potentially help society keep going without total calamity until we get a vaccine or otherwise get a handle on things. Masks can help retail, offices and restaurants keep their doors open. But due to horrific leadership from the top, misguided business lobbying and public intimidation, local mandates are being revoked or just not followed—if there are local mandates at all.

Since nothing’s ever going to happen at the federal level, that leaves the state.

In the seven-plus year history of the Independent, we’ve never written an endorsement or editorialized directly on policy. That is, until now: Gov. Newsom, it’s time to save lives and give California’s reopening process its best chance of success by enacting a statewide mask order.

Today’s links:

• Some of the most encouraging medical news since the pandemic began came out today: A commonly used steroid, called dexamethasone, has been shown by scientists at the University of Oxford to save the lives of many COVID-19 patients who require oxygen. According to The New York Times, “In the study, dexamethasone reduced deaths of patients on ventilators by one-third, and deaths of patients on oxygen by one-fifth.” Now, this doesn’t solve the pandemic, and the study has yet to be peer reviewed, meaning we need to take the news with that massive grain of salt we keep talking about. Nonetheless, this could be a very big deal in terms of saving thousands of lives.

• Speaking of taking things with a grain of salt: The county released its weekly district reports today. Looking at the District 4 report—in other words, the Coachella Valley—the COVID-19 numbers look so-so. We’re holding steady, more or less, with one big exception: The positivity rate is up to a disturbing 16 percent. However … the numbers don’t add up. If you divide the number of positives (345) by the number of tests (4,840), you get the positivity rate—and while the report explains that there’s a lag because tests results can take 3-5 days to come in, the difference between 345 divided by 4,840, or 7.1 percent, and 16 percent is so massive that it doesn’t seem possible for all these numbers to be correct; it’s also entirely possible I am misunderstanding something. I have a message in to the county to get an explanation; I will report back when I get an answer.

• The Palm Springs Police Department today announced that an officer has tested positive for COVID-19. The city says that officers who were in contact with that officer have been quarantined—and all seem fine—and that any known members of the public who came in contact with the officer have been notified. Get the info here.

• If you’re eating, or will be eating soon, or are generally averse to things that are disgusting, skip to the next item. Otherwise, check out this story from The New York Times; as someone noted on Twitter, this headline gets more disturbing with each word: “Flushing the Toilet May Fling Coronavirus Aerosols All Over: A new study shows how turbulence from a toilet bowl can create a large plume that is potentially infectious to a bathroom’s next visitor.”

• The San Francisco Chronicle talked to the owner of a Napa restaurant who opened his doors—only to close them again, and go back to doing just takeout, a week later.

• As noted in this space, numerous large media organizations have faced reckonings regarding diversity ever since the Black Lives Matter protests began—including the Los Angeles Times, NPR reports.

• From the Independent: We’re talking to three local protest organizers about their motivations; for the second piece in our series, we chatted with Erin Teran, one of the organizers of the #NoMoreHashtags rally in Indio last week. Key quote: “Going to a protest or a rally is so very important, because we have to be able to assemble and have a voice—but young people have to understand that you need to have a voice at City Council meetings and Board of Supervisors meetings, too.”

• Federal law enforcement agencies have pledged to investigate the hanging deaths of two Black men in Southern California in recent weeks. Local authorities have said there are no signs of foul play—but family members of the two men aren’t buying it.

• Some members of Congress who received federal stimulus grants and/or loans are now opposing legislation to shine a light on where all that taxpayer money went. See a problem?

• A GOP congressman who refused to wear a mask on the House floor has now come down with COVID-19, as has his wife and son. Ugh.

That’s enough for today. Thanks to all of you who have become Supporters of the Independent; if you would like to join these people in supporting quality local journalism, made free to all with no paywalls, you can do so here. We’ll be back tomorrow.

Published in Daily Digest

It’s been a crazy, confusing and all-round fascinating news day, so let’s get right to it:

Riverside County wants to move forward in the reopening process! That was the message sent today by the Board of Supervisors, who are trying to make the case to Gov. Newsom that we’re pretty gosh-darned close to being ready to move further into Stage 2.

• Los Angeles County is going to be closed deep into the summer! That was the somewhat misleading message sent by this Los Angeles Times headline: “L.A. County could keep stay-at-home orders in place well into summer.” The headline was later changed. Why? Well, the story ran amok on social media, and late in the day, the county’s public health director, Barbara Ferrer, sent out a news release clarifying that things were not as dire as the Los Angeles Times made things out to be: “L.A. County is continuing its progress on the road to recovery, with planned reopening of beaches for active recreation and an expansion of permitted retail activities coming tomorrow. While the Safer at Home orders will remain in place over the next few months, restrictions will be gradually relaxed under our 5-stage Roadmap to Recovery, while making sure we are keeping our communities as safe as possible during this pandemic. We are being guided by science and data that will safely move us forward along the road to recovery in a measured way—one that allows us to ensure that effective distancing and infection control measures are in place. We’re counting on the public’s continued compliance with the orders to enable us to relax restrictions, and we are committed to making sure that L.A. County is in the best position to provide its 10 million residents with the highest level of wellness possible as we progressively get back to normal.”

• Gov. Newsom was busy today. First, he signed an order allowing pharmacies to begin administering COVID-19 tests, which is a good thing. Second, he released a list of criteria restaurants will need to follow when they’re allowed to reopen for dine-in business. Third, he gave two Northern California counties the go-ahead to move further into Stage 2.

• Meanwhile, Arizona, our neighbors to the east, will pretty much be open by the end of the week.

• But back here in California, the state university system announced that—like College of the Desert locally—the fall semester will almost entirely take place online.

• Is all of this confusing the bloody hell out of you? Does what’s opening and closing and NOT opening and closing seem contradictory and random and baffling? I feel the same way! So, to make you feel better, here’s a delightful whiskey sour recipe. And if you don’t drink, here’s an easy chocolate cake recipe. The prep only takes one bowl—a needed dose of simplicity during these chaotic times.

• More encouraging drug news: While more study needs to be done, a combination of three drugs appears to be effective in helping COVID-19 patients recover.

• More evidence that the new normal may be better in some ways: Twitter has told most of its employees that they can work from home even after this whole mess is over.

• The city of Palm Springs could lose as much as $78 million in tax revenue this fiscal year and next, and wants federal help.

The California Legislature is working on a relief bill that would, among other things, give renters more than a decade to catch up on rent payments missed as a result of the pandemic.

• Are you young? Then Riverside County would like you to consider getting tested.

• Related: This opinion piece from Time magazine explains how testing a representative sample of the population could help slow the spread of the virus.

The economic shutdown is devastating small businesses. We knew that was happening, but The Washington Post has the numbers to prove it.

• Parts of Europe are starting to reopen, too, and The Conversation says the United States may be able to learn some lessons from that process.

Some people are perfectly happy with being stuck at home. God bless them.

• And now for something completely different: Cactus Hugs examined the mysterious message that was being painted on the roof of the Red Barn bar in Palm Desert. UPDATE: The message is finished, and it says “Suck My Governor.” While Red Barn management meant this as an insult, it sounds to me like a compliment, in that it’s an invitation for the governor to receive some pleasure, and I have clearly thought about this too much so I am going to be quiet now.

That’s all for today. Buy our Coloring Book, because you want to support local journalism AND the Create Center for the Arts AND local artists. Please consider becoming a Supporter of the Independent if you have a few bucks to spare, and you value independent local journalism. Wash your hands. Wear a mask. We’ll be back tomorrow.

Published in Daily Digest

After a flurry of rumors, parodies and anticipation, the lineup for Coachella 2013 was finally released earlier this week.

While those of us here at the Independent have our own opinions on the lineups (No Daft Punk?! Damn it!), we'll shut up for now. Instead, we scoured the good ol' Weekly Wide Web for reactions.

We did find a wee bit of consensus. For example, everyone was understandably bummed that some of the rumored headliners (Stones, Bowie, Daft Punk) were just rumors; and there's a surprising amount of consensus that the second-tier acts are rather strong. 

Here are eight bits of reaction worth noting, in no particular order:

  • The Los Angeles Times' August Brown was surprised by the lack of EDM (electronic dance music) in the lineup. "One has to scroll down to the third line of any given day before a proper dance act is listed (some electro-leaning bands like The Postal Service and New Order have higher billing). In more recent years, EDM acts like Swedish House Mafia and Tiesto have closed out nights on the main stage and drew more fans than the ostensible headliners," Brown notes.
  • The provocateurs over at Spin offer 10 reasons why the lineup sucks—and 20 why it doesn't. Spin's Chris Martins, for example, is excited about the reunion of The Postal Service, but pissed about the apparent lack of holograms. (RIP, Tupac.)
  • Across the pond, the folks at The Guardian seem thrilled that British bands "dominate" the lineup. "Joining Damon Albarn and co on the first night of the event, which takes place over consecutive weekends in April, will be the Stone Roses. The band will be playing their first US gigs since re-forming in 2012," the paper notes. "The lineup has a heavy UK presence, with performances promised from the xx, New Order, Hot Chip, Two Door Cinema Club, Biffy Clyro, Foals, Franz Ferdinand, Jessie Ware, Jake Bugg, James Blake and Johnny Marr."
  • Speaking of the Stone Roses: An entire Tumblr page has been developed to compile the reactions of (mostly younger) Twitter-users asking: Who in the heck are the Stone Roses? It's an oddly amusing read. (Doesn't anyone know how to use the Google these days?)
  • The folks over at MTV.com (Remember when MTV had music credibility? The folks who have tweets on the aforementioned Tumblr page probably don't!) focus on the reunions. James Montgomery writes (after actually using the word "kvetching"): "Late Thursday night, (Coachella) organizers took to Twitter to reveal the full lineup for the 2013 edition of the fest, which features recently-reunited acts like the Stone Roses, Blur and the Postal Service, returning indie champs Phoenix, the Yeah Yeah Yeahs and Vampire Weekend and, uh, the Red Hot Chili Peppers."
  • Up in the Pacific Northwest, Portland, Ore.'s Willamette Week is decidedly unimpressed with the lineup. "Coachella’s hotly anticipated lineup is out and—woof. If this lineup was announced for (George, Wash. festival) Sasquatch, we’d be ho-hum. But for the West Coast’s premiere music festival to have Blur, Phoenix and the Red Hot Chili Peppers headlining is really bumming us out." Writer Martin Cizmar then goes on to list holograms that could save the festival. Har!
  • Hollywood.com's Jean Bentley sees evidence of Coachella organizer Goldenvoice's disappointment in the lineup announcement's timing: "The fact that the lineup was announced via Twitter after 8 p.m. (Pacific time!) on a Thursday—and the fact that it's out weeks later than in past years—is also quite telling. If bigger names were playing, it seems like the bands wouldn't have been revealed at such a random, late hour."
  • And finally, the granddaddy the alternative press, The Village Voice, gives the lineup a thumbs-up—albeit a weak thumbs-up. Brian McManus writes: "So what do you think? There's lots to like in there if you drill down far enough. Visions of a reunited Postal Service and the four Wu Tang members who actually show up wandering the camp grounds together are already swimming through our heads."

For more information on the festival, including an inaccurate countdown clock (as of this writing, the clock says the April festival is just two days and change away, which we don't think is correct), head over to coachella.com.