CVIndependent

Sat11282020

Last updateMon, 24 Aug 2020 12pm

One day, those of us who survive this crazy time will look back on this year—and particularly this week—and shake our heads at the sheer unbelievability.

The Trump tax thing. That debate. The sudden—and somehow surprising, even though it should have been rather predictable—flood of positive coronavirus tests among prominent people, headlined by the president himself, who is currently being treated at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center.

This has all happened since Sunday. And who in the hell knows what’s coming next.

So, on with the gusher of news:

• Today has seen a nonstop stream of updates regarding who has tested positive for COVID-19, and who hasn’t. Here’s The New York Times’ live updates page. It’s worth a follow—and you’ll want to hit refresh frequently.

• A professor of immunology, writing for The Conversation, breaks down why President Trump, who is 74, is more at risk of the coronavirus than people who are younger. Key quote: “As you age, the reduced ‘attention span’ of your innate and adaptive immune responses make it harder for the body to respond to viral infection, giving the virus the upper hand. Viruses can take advantage of your immune system’s slow start and quickly overwhelm you, resulting in serious disease and death.”

• A local news bombshell dropped yesterday: Palm Springs City Manager David Ready will be retiring at the end of the year, after two decades as the city’s chief executive. While Ready’s tenure as city manager was far from perfect—the whole Wessman/Pougnet thing happened under his watch—and his high salary made him a target for detractors, it’s undeniable that the city has grown and thrived, despite three painful recessions, since he took the top city job in 2000. Interestingly, both Indio and Palm Desert are also looking for new city managers right now.

• I have to tip my hat to Riverside County, which has done a fantastic job of issuing relevant and helpful statistical updates regarding the pandemic (even though it’s weird, if understandable, that the county takes weekends off, because the virus doesn’t). Anyway, every weekday, the county releases an updated Data Summary. Here’s today’s, and I want to draw your attention to the little yellow box in the upper right corner of the last page: The county’s positivity rate, after fairly steady declines since mid-July, is heading upward again—fairly rapidly. Is this just a little blip, like we had in mid-August and earlier this month? Or is it something else? Stay tuned.

• Some news that flew under the radar today, because of, well, you know: The grand jury recording in the Breonna Taylor case was released. NPR looks at what the 15 hours of recordings reveal.

• Gov. Gavin Newsom is on my personal shit list right now. Why? Per the Los Angeles Times: “Gov. Gavin Newsom vetoed a bill that would have further protected journalists covering demonstrations from physical or verbal obstruction by a law enforcement officer.” The Times explains his justification for the veto, which sort of makes sense, but not really.

• Barring a change of plans, cruise ships will be able to set sail starting next month—even though the CDC wanted to keep them docked until mid-February. The White House vetoed that plan, lest Floridians and its voters get upset.

Wisconsin has become the latest COVID-19 epicenter in the United States. Hospitals are strained, and health officers are panicked. From the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel: “Before Sept. 17, the state had never recorded a day with more than 2,000 new cases. Over the last seven days, however, it has reported an average of nearly 2,500 new coronavirus cases each day. Those aren't just the highest numbers of the pandemic; they're three times higher than a month ago.

Things are also rough in Puerto Rico—and not just because of COVID-19. According to NBC News: “The increasing demand for grocery boxes … coincides with a looming funding cliff that stands to eliminate or reduce food assistance to 1.5 million Puerto Ricans, including over 300,000 children, according to an analysis from the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities, a nonpartisan research and policy institute.” Yikes.

Texas Gov. Greg Abbott yesterday restricted the number of places where ballots can be dropped off by hand to one per county. Per NBC News: “Harris County, which includes much of the sprawling city of Houston, has a population of more than 4.7 million people, according to the Census Bureau. The county is home to 25 percent of the state's Black residents and 18 percent of its Hispanic population. Before Abbott's proclamation, the county had created 11 ballot drop-off locations.” Abbott cited security concerns, but really, how can this be viewed as anything but voter suppression?

Amazon said yesterday that nearly 20,000 employees—or 1.44 percent of the company’s workforce—have contracted COVID-19, as of Sept. 19. According to CNBC: “The information comes months after labor groups, politicians and regulators repeatedly pressed Amazon to disclose how many of its workers were infected by COVID-19. Early on in the pandemic, warehouse workers raised concerns that Amazon wasn’t doing enough to protect them from getting sick and called for facilities with confirmed cases to be shut down. Lacking data from Amazon, warehouse workers compiled a crowdsourced database of infections based on notifications of new cases at facilities across the U.S.”

The Paycheck Protection Program continues to be a mess. According to The Washington Post: “The Treasury Department and Small Business Administration have not yet forgiven any of the 5.2 million emergency coronavirus loans issued to small businesses and need to do more to combat fraud, government watchdogs told Congress on Thursday. Small businesses that received Paycheck Protection Program funds, as well as their banks, have been frustrated by the difficulty in applying for loans to be forgiven, despite rules saying that if the funds are spent mostly on payroll they will not need to be paid back.”

• A speck of good news: The supply of remdesivir—one of the most effective drugs in treating COVID-19—has caught up with demand, to the point where the drug-maker, Gilead Sciences has taken over distribution of the drug from the federal government.

The Washington Post has declared the current recession to be the “most unequal in modern history.” In web-graphic form, the newspaper explains how minorities and lower-income Americans have been hurt the most.

Speaking of inequality, check out this lede, from the San Francisco Chronicle: “Federal funding that put money in the pockets of local farmers and organic produce in the mouths of food-insecure families has come to an end. The United States Department of Agriculture launched the Farmers to Families Program during the pandemic to get free food to low-income families while supporting small farms scrambling for more business. But the department recently stopped issuing funds to local community organizations in favor of multinational food distributors like Sysco.” Sigh.

• I was again a guest on this week’s I Love Gay Palm Springs podcast, with hosts Shann Carr and Brad Fuhr. We discuss all things COVID—including sports! Take a listen, even though it was recorded yesterday, which seems like seven years ago, news-wise.

• Finally, if you’re in the mood to read about the inappropriate behavior that reportedly led to Kimberly Guilfoyle’s departure from Fox News, have at it, via SF Gate. Why should you care about Kimberly Guilfoyle? You probably shouldn’t, even if she is Gavin Newsom’s ex, is dating Donald Trump Jr., is the Trump campaign's finance chair, and became well known for her crazy speech at the Republican National Convention. But, boy, the things she allegedly made her poor former assistant—who, according to the New Yorker, was paid $4 million by Fox News to settle a sexual-harassment claim against Guilfoyle—do make for some salacious reading, if you’re into that sort of thing.

That’s all for now. Consider helping us continue producing quality local journalism by becoming a Supporter of the Independent. Please, please, please try to unplug and safely enjoy life this weekend. As always, thanks for reading.

Published in Daily Digest

After reading Friday’s Daily Digest, a reader unsubscribed from the e-mailed version, with this note:

“You shouldn’t be giving your personal opinion in informational articles. And if you are, you should clearly state it’s your opinion.”

Sigh.

OK, even though that reader left us, for those of you remain, here’s a disclaimer: This here Daily Digest includes both news links and bursts of personal commentary, by yours truly, Jimmy Boegle. By the way, there is no such thing as “objective” journalism, and it’s nigh impossible to write “informational articles,” with any degree of complexity, without some sort of “personal opinion” slipping, intentionally or unintentionally, into said article. So there.

I could write a treatise about this topic, but I won’t, because others already have. Google “objective journalism,” as well as “false balance” or “bothsidesism,” and you’ll see a bazillion pieces about all of this.

I’ll try to take the time to address this topic in more depth on a day when there’s less going on (so, sometime in 2023, maybe?), but for now, I’ll discard the words “objective” and “balance” and “opinion,” and just leave you with this: The goal of the Daily Digest, as well as everything else in the Independent, is to offer the reader a bit knowledge, entertainment and/or enlightenment, in a way that’s transparent, and fair, and as free of conflicts of interest as possible.

If you have any questions about this, or want to have a further discussion, hit reply—seriously. I am happy to discuss.

So, here’s the news of the day, along with those aforementioned bursts of political commentary:

• Is it just me, or does this seem, well, very wrong? “The Office of the Director of National Intelligence has informed the House and Senate Select Committees on Intelligence that it'll no longer be briefing in-person on election security issues, according to letters obtained by CNN. Instead, ODNI will primarily provide written updates to the congressional panels, a senior administration official said.

• Is it just me, or does this seem, well, scary as hell? “One of President Trump’s top medical advisers is urging the White House to embrace a controversial ‘herd immunity’ strategy to combat the pandemic, which would entail allowing the coronavirus to spread through most of the population to quickly build resistance to the virus, while taking steps to protect those in nursing homes and other vulnerable populations, according to five people familiar with the discussions.

The New York Times on Saturday ran a story saying that some coronavirus tests may be too darn sensitive. Wait, what? “Most of these people are not likely to be contagious, and identifying them may contribute to bottlenecks that prevent those who are contagious from being found in time. But researchers say the solution is not to test less, or to skip testing people without symptoms, as recently suggested by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Instead, new data underscore the need for more widespread use of rapid tests, even if they are less sensitive.”

Spain was one of the hardest-hit countries by the virus … and the second wave of COVID-19 has arrived there. According to The New York Times: “France is also surging, as are parts of Eastern Europe, and cases are ticking up in Germany, Greece, Italy and Belgium, too, but in the past week, Spain has recorded the most new cases on the continent by far—more than 53,000. With 114 new infections per 100,000 people in that time, the virus is spreading faster in Spain than in the United States, more than twice as fast as in France, about eight times the rate in Italy and Britain, and ten times the pace in Germany.”

Today is the final day of California’s 2020 Legislature session, and our friends at CalMatters have put together a tracker with some of the more noteworthy legislation that’s made it to the governor’s desk. Check it out.

• “Twitter on Sunday removed a post retweeted by President Donald Trump that falsely claimed the COVID-19 pandemic is not as deadly as officials have reported,” says this lede from USA Today, proving yet again that we are apparently in the worst timeline.

• And here’s yet more proof that this is the worst timeline, compliments of an Arizona State University professor, writing for The Conversation: “In August, the Trump administration announced the plan to end the 2020 Census count a month early, on Sept. 30 instead of Oct. 31. With about a month left before that new end date, fewer than two-thirds of U.S. households have been counted so far. The result will be that the Census will count fewer Black Americans, Indigenous peoples, Asian Americans and Americans of Hispanic or Latino origin than actually live in the U.S. That will mean less public money for essential services in their communities, and less representation by elected officials at the state and federal levels.” Sigh.

• Today marks the end of the deadliest month from COVID-19 in the state of California. Let’s all pray that August remains the deadliest month.

According to CNBC, President Trump’s executive order regarding the deferral of the payroll tax has resulted in a confusing mess.

• The head of the FDA had to come out and say that any decisions on vaccine use will be based on science rather than politics—and the fact that he had to come out and say that is alarming, says NBC News. “(Dr. Stephen) Hahn made the pledge after a series of recent public missteps involving the FDA and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention—two of the federal agencies critical to the U.S. coronavirus response—which have damaged their reputations at a time when they are needed the most, according to seven prominent doctors and scientists who spoke to NBC News. They say that the recent events are clear signs of political interference from the White House and that they have shaken their trust and confidence in the leadership of the agencies.”

• California needs firefighters. A number of former inmates got firefighting experience while they were in prison. However, former inmates aren’t allowed to be firefighters. The San Francisco Chronicle looks at this dilemma—which, fingers crossed, could be repaired by the Legislature in its final day this year.

• Two seniors at a Wisconsin High School thought it was, well, bonkers that their school had a dress code … but no face-mask requirement. The Lily, a publication of The Washington Post, looks at the successful fight Ava Rheeve and Julia Going put up against the madness.

The New York Times looks how the move to reopen colleges in some places is leading to technological advances that could benefit us all: “The fall of 2020 will go down as a period of profound experimentation at colleges and universities transformed into hothouse laboratories. They are trying out wastewater tests, dozens of health-check apps and versions of homegrown contact technologies that log student movement and exposure risk. And they are experimenting with different testing methods that might yield faster results and be easier to administer, such as using saliva instead of nasal swabs.”

• Online/virtual, not-in-person classes are under way at College of the Desert—despite a malware attack that took down the college’s website and email system. Yeesh!

• As god-awful as this pandemic has been, we can at least take a teeny, tiny amount of solace that it’s spurred some airlines to ditch change and standby feessomething United Airlines started a trend with following an announcement yesterday.

That’s enough for today. Please vote in the first round of the Best of Coachella Valley readers’ poll if you haven’t already. Also, if you value the Daily Digest and the other journalism published by the Independent, please consider throwing a few bucks our way. Thanks for reading; the Digest will return on Wednesday. In the meantime, watch CVIndependent.com for updates.

Published in Daily Digest