CVIndependent

Fri10302020

Last updateMon, 24 Aug 2020 12pm

05 Oct 2020

Mysteries Surrounding Trump's Health; 'Proud Boys' Goes Gay—Coachella Valley Independent Daily Digest: Oct. 5, 2020

Written by 

This morning, shortly after I woke up, I stared at the ceiling for a few moments before sighing and silently saying to myself: Dear lord, what could THIS week possibly have in store for all of us?!

Trump’s COVID-19 case! The county’s tier status! A possible vote by the Board of Supervisors to sort of ignore the state’s tiers! The vice-presidential debate!

Strap yourself in for what could be a weird ride.

Today’s news:

Here’s the New York Times’ update page on the COVID-19 spread throughout the government. President Donald Trump left Walter Reed Medical Center late this afternoon to return to the White House, and didn’t necessarily look all that good while doing so—hours after he tweeted, in part: “Don’t be afraid of Covid. Don’t let it dominate your life.” Meanwhile, 210,000 Americans have died of COVID-19.

• Medical experts are saying that the details released regarding President Trump’s treatment for COVID-19 don’t make sense. According to The Washington Post: “Robert Wachter, chairman of the University of California at San Francisco’s department of medicine, said any patient of his with Trump’s symptoms and treatment who wanted to be discharged from the hospital three days after their admission would need to sign out against doctors’ orders because it would be so ill-advised. “For someone sick enough to have required remdesivir and dexamethasone, I can’t think of a situation in which a patient would be okay to leave on day three, even with the White House’s medical capacity,” Wachter said.”

• So … how much information should be released about a sick or fading politician? The New York Times points out that this is a question that goes well beyond Trump’s battle with COVID-19. Key quote: “This concentration of power in the hands of the old is an American phenomenon, Derek Thompson recently wrote in The Atlantic, noting that our leaders are getting older as European leaders get younger. ‘If government of the elderly, by the elderly, and for the elderly will not perish from the Earth, the rest of us might suffer instead,’ he lamented.”

I am just going to leave this headline from The Conversation right here, and then slowly walk away: “Trump’s COVID-19 diagnosis: What lies ahead could include a constitutional crisis over succession.”

The vice-presidential debate is still slated to take place on Wednesday—but Mike Pence and Kamala Harris will be seated farther apart than originally planned, with a Plexiglas barrier between them.

• Sort of related: The CDC today affirmed something it announced last month, and then took back, even though it’s now affirmed by scientists around the world: The coronavirus “can sometimes spread through airborne particles that can ‘linger in the air for minutes to hours’ and among people who are more than 6 feet apart.”

• That now-infamous Rose Garden ceremony officially announcing the nomination of Judge Amy Coney Barrett to the U.S. Supreme Court—which appears to have been a super-spreader event—has a Riverside County victim: Pastor Greg Laurie, of Riverside megachurch Harvest Christian Fellowship, attended the ceremony—and he announced today he has tested positive for COVID-19.

• Despite all of these cases, the White House is NOT doing contact-tracing from that event, according to The New York Times. Sigh.

• This is hilarious and fantastic: Gay men have hijacked the #ProudBoys hashtag away from the white-supremacist group by using it along with pictures of themselves and other gay men. CNN explains.

Regal Cinemas—which operates theaters in Palm Springs, Rancho Mirage and Indio—has announced it will close all of its theaters around the country for a while. “Regal is shutting down theaters again less than two months after it started to reopen U.S. locations in late August. The decision was announced after the James Bond franchise's No Time to Die was shelved until 2021, further pushing back a release that had already been delayed.” This comes just a couple of weeks after theaters were allowed to reopen in Riverside County.

• Dang it, even Iceland is having a coronavirus spike: “The government ordered bars, gyms and some other businesses to close and is limiting most group gatherings to a maximum of 20 people, down from prior restrictions that capped events at 200.

Some good news on the coronavirus treatment front, from the San Francisco Chronicle: “(A new) drug, which could eventually work on coronavirus much the way Tamiflu reduces flu symptoms, is being rolled out in a clinical trial at Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital, one of many U.S. sites that are enrolling volunteers for the study. The medicine, made by the drug company Eli Lilly, is a type of drug called a monoclonal antibody that in preliminary studies appears to help people in early or mild stages of the disease.”

• Some other good news: Most Riverside County Library System locations reopened today. Get details here.

Gov. Newsom today nominated Martin J. Jenkins to the California Supreme Court. According to SFGate: “Jenkins would be the first openly gay man and third African American man to serve on the state's highest court, potentially replacing one of the court's more conservative members with a former federal civil rights attorney who prosecuted cross burnings and police misconduct cases under President Ronald Reagan.”

• From the Independent: Kevin Fitzgerald checked in with the folks at the Coachella Valley Boxing Club, the Coachella-based gym, led by Lee Espinoza, that has produced multiple world champions. It’s just reopening after its doors were shut by the pandemic. Kevin also talked to Espinoza star pupil Citlalli Ortiz about her Olympic hopes. Key quote: “While the gym was closed, the aspiring champs of today were relegated to training outdoors in the summer heat of neighboring Bagdouma Park, or in the garages and backyards of their family homes. While Espinoza wasn’t involved in this day-to-day training, he made sure the equipment from his gym was available to anyone who needed it.

• Our partners at CalMatters examine something wildfires often leave behind: Tainted drinking water. Key quote: “When wildfires spread across California, they leave a cascade of water problems in their wake: Some communities have their drinking water poisoned by toxic substances. Others wrestle with ash and debris washed into reservoirs and lakes. And many living in remote stretches of the state struggle with accessing enough water to fight fires.

Please vote in our Best of Coachella Valley readers’ poll, if you haven’t done so already. If you can afford to do so, please consider becoming a Supporter of the Independent, to help us continue producing quality local journalism and making it available free to all. As always, thanks for reading.

Leave a comment

Make sure you enter all the required information, indicated by an asterisk (*). HTML code is not allowed.