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Thu12032020

Last updateMon, 24 Aug 2020 12pm

Good news, Sandler fans! You can file his latest “stupid” movie in the file “Stupid Sandler Films That Are Fun and Not Torturous!” It’ll go in that file with the likes of Happy Gilmore, Billy Madison and, my personal fave, Little Nicky. (Nothing in Sandler comedies beats Henry Winkler covered in bees … nothing!)

Hubie Halloween was directed by Steven Brill, who also directed Nicky and Mr. Deeds. Is it one of the best dumb Sandler movies? Well, no. It’s somewhere in the middle—not as good as Gilmore; just as good as The Waterboy; and definitely better than painful shit like The Ridiculous 6 and Jack and Jill.

Sandler plays Hubie, a safety-obsessed, Halloween-loving town resident with a speech pattern similar to the one he fashioned for The Waterboy. Halloween is coming; Hubie wants to help keep things safe with his super-Thermos—and he has eyes for Violet Valentine. Considering that Violet is played by Julie Bowen, who also played Sandler’s love interest in Happy Gilmore, who can blame him? Bowen looks happy to be back in Sandler-land.

Hubie is the subject of a lot of ridicule, with kids throwing food and metal objects at him while he rides his bike, and adult bullying from the likes of Ray Liotta, Tim Meadows and Maya Rudolph. The plot offers up a couple of scary subplots including a crazy neighbor (Steve Buscemi) and an escaped mental patient à la Michael Myers.

Sandler and Brill tee up a lot of dumb gags, and many of them land. The dialogue—especially during a rather nasty exchange in a barn—had me laughing hard at times, and the film never drifts into the lazy territory that Sandler films often do. In fact, Hubie Halloween is legitimately scary in spots. But best of all, it’s good-natured and fun, and never ugly.

One last note: If you don’t laugh at the many novelty T-shirts June Squibb sports in this one, well, you have a dead heart.

Hubie Halloween is now streaming on Netflix.

Published in DVDs/Home Viewing

Adam Sandler’s third movie with Netflix is the very definition of overindulgence. There’s a decent movie in here from director Steven Brill, who worked with Sandler previously on Little Nicky, Mr. Deeds and The Do-Over—but Sandy Wexler is a mess obscured by too many subplots.

Sandler stars as the title character, a talent manager trying to find new clients in the 1990s. After working with low-level comedians and daredevils, Sandy finds Courtney Clarke (Jennifer Hudson), an amusement-park performer with a stunning voice. Sandy takes charge of her career, and sends her on a superstar trajectory. Of course, Sandler creates one of his weirdo characterizations, with a goofy voice and strange mannerisms.

While some of the 1990s jokes involving Fruitopia, Arsenio Hall and the Atkins Diet are funny, Sandler and Brill take the movie off into a strange, unlikely romance realm that destroys all of the fun.

The movie is supremely overstuffed at 130 minutes, with one subplot too many involving Terry Crews as a flamboyant wrestler. His entire arc could’ve been left on the cutting-room floor.

Kevin James has a fairly funny supporting role as a ventriloquist who carries on regular conversations through his dummies, and Nick Swardson scores some laughs as a daredevil reminiscent of Super Dave Osborne and Evil Knievel. Hudson is good in her role, even when the character inexplicably falls for Sandy.

At 90 minutes and without the love story, this one might’ve been decent. As it stands, it’s another miss for Sandler.

Sandy Wexler is currently streaming on Netflix.

Published in DVDs/Home Viewing

The second of four films in the Adam Sandler Netflix era after the horrible The Ridiculous 6 is still pretty bad moviemaking, but The Do-Over is a step in the right direction. 

Director Steven Brill made two of the better Sandler vehicles in Little Nicky and Mr. Deeds, and their third pairing has its moments. That’s thanks in large part to the pairing of Sandler and an effective David Spade, who is cast against type as Charlie, a nebbish nerd looking for new start on life. Sandler plays Max, who shows up at their high school reunion, takes pity on Charlie and fakes both of their deaths so they can smoke joints and drink for the rest of their lives.

The plot isn’t that simple; the two wind up being pursued by a killer in a fairly funny homage to Die Hard. The film is put together better than most of the later Sandler comedies, and it packs quite a few good laughs. Unfortunately, it also veers into overkill way too many times, and the gross stuff feels discordant and just wrong.

Still, I liked the characters, and the film classes up a bit at the halfway mark when Paula Patton enters the picture. She has a fight with Kathryn Hahn that is one of the better smack-downs you will see in a movie this summer.

The movie doesn’t work as a whole, but it does show that Sandler and Spade could be a good screen duo in the hands of a semi-capable director. Also, it has Natasha Leggero in it, and that’s always a good thing.

Had everybody just declined a few of the extreme sight gags, and perhaps edited a solid 15 minutes from the movie, I might’ve been able to recommend the film. As it stands, it’s a near-miss. Hey, a near-miss for Sandler these days is a major triumph! 

Published in DVDs/Home Viewing