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Thu12032020

Last updateMon, 24 Aug 2020 12pm

Good news, Sandler fans! You can file his latest “stupid” movie in the file “Stupid Sandler Films That Are Fun and Not Torturous!” It’ll go in that file with the likes of Happy Gilmore, Billy Madison and, my personal fave, Little Nicky. (Nothing in Sandler comedies beats Henry Winkler covered in bees … nothing!)

Hubie Halloween was directed by Steven Brill, who also directed Nicky and Mr. Deeds. Is it one of the best dumb Sandler movies? Well, no. It’s somewhere in the middle—not as good as Gilmore; just as good as The Waterboy; and definitely better than painful shit like The Ridiculous 6 and Jack and Jill.

Sandler plays Hubie, a safety-obsessed, Halloween-loving town resident with a speech pattern similar to the one he fashioned for The Waterboy. Halloween is coming; Hubie wants to help keep things safe with his super-Thermos—and he has eyes for Violet Valentine. Considering that Violet is played by Julie Bowen, who also played Sandler’s love interest in Happy Gilmore, who can blame him? Bowen looks happy to be back in Sandler-land.

Hubie is the subject of a lot of ridicule, with kids throwing food and metal objects at him while he rides his bike, and adult bullying from the likes of Ray Liotta, Tim Meadows and Maya Rudolph. The plot offers up a couple of scary subplots including a crazy neighbor (Steve Buscemi) and an escaped mental patient à la Michael Myers.

Sandler and Brill tee up a lot of dumb gags, and many of them land. The dialogue—especially during a rather nasty exchange in a barn—had me laughing hard at times, and the film never drifts into the lazy territory that Sandler films often do. In fact, Hubie Halloween is legitimately scary in spots. But best of all, it’s good-natured and fun, and never ugly.

One last note: If you don’t laugh at the many novelty T-shirts June Squibb sports in this one, well, you have a dead heart.

Hubie Halloween is now streaming on Netflix.

Published in DVDs/Home Viewing

Well … this oddity came out of nowhere.

Andy Samberg and his Lonely Island cronies recently dropped The Unauthorized Bash Brothers Experience on Netflix. This nutty 27-minute “musical poem” chronicles the late ’80s insanity that was the Bash Brothers—the steroid-enriched combo of Oakland Athletics baseball players Jose Canseco (Samberg) and Mark McGwire (Akiva Schaffer).

The short film chronicles their rise and fall, taking a hilariously esoteric deep dive into psyches that were apparently a lot more complicated than their athletic exteriors revealed. The Lonely Island guys grew up in the Bay Area, so this is something that is close to home for them. It’s also an inspired and unexpected choice upon which to base a half-hour music video.

Musical group Haim shows up with Maya Rudolph to do an ass-shaking routine that reminds of Janet Jackson’s “Nasty,” while Sterling K. Brown makes an appearance as, yes, Sia. This is actually as visually impressive as it is musically, in line with the Lonely Island’s hilarious Popstar: Never Stop Never Stopping.

The highlight actually comes during the credits, when Jorma Taccone shows up as a dorky, singing Joe Montana, another Bay Area sports legend. Popstar didn’t get any traction in theaters (although it deserved it), so maybe the shorter format will catch fire on Netflix, and we will get a bunch of these. That would be nice.

The Lonely Island Presents: The Unauthorized Bash Brothers Experience is now streaming on Netflix

Published in DVDs/Home Viewing

It’s tough being a puppet these days. After what seemed like a return to puppet glory with The Muppets in 2011, the cinematic Muppet momentum ended three years later with Muppets Most Wanted—and then the 2015 TV series tanked.

Considering this stalling of The Muppets franchise, it seemed like a good time for a former Muppet stalwart, Brian Henson (son of Muppet founder Jim), to take puppets in a more-adult direction. After all, Jim Henson had a more-adult incarnation for The Muppets in mind way back in the 1970s when they appeared on the first season of Saturday Night Live. (It’s true!) A raunchier band of puppets would be a fine addition to the Henson legacy.

That is, it would be a fine addition had Henson Alternative—an “adult” branch of the Jim Henson Company—made something better than The Happytime Murders, a listless, joyless, humorless exercise in how not to make a puppet movie.

The film is set up like a Muppets movie, with puppets interacting with humans—but Kermit and company are banned from the set in favor of bland, seriously unfunny puppets that fail to distinguish themselves in any way. Brian Henson directs, his first big-screen directing gig since Muppet Treasure Island, and it’s a lost puppet cause. Henson’s directing chops have not aged like fine wine; they’ve aged like a mango that got lost in the back of the refrigerator six months ago.

Melissa McCarthy—having a disastrous year with this and the terrible Life of the Party—takes the lead human role as Det. Connie Edwards, former partner of puppet cop-turned-private investigator Phil Philips (voiced by Bill Barretta).

The two team up again when puppet cast members of ’80s TV show The Happytime Gang start getting the cotton pulled out of them in a series of visually uncreative deaths. (OK, the one puppet getting shredded by band of dogs led by a Boston terrier made me chuckle a little, but it’s only because I have a Boston terrier currently living in my home, and I’m pretty sure she would shred a living puppet if given the chance.)

While there are hints of some funny premises—for example, Connie got a puppet liver transplant, so she’s tragically addicted to sugar—none of them are taken to fruitfully funny extremes. That’s because writer Todd Berger’s screenplay thinks gags should be a laugh-getters just because they’re naughty. There’s no room for wit or depth in his land of puppetry, just F-bombs and silly-string ejaculate. Frankly, I’m surprised the film doesn’t have an overload of puppet farts. (Actually, puppet farts might be funny. They’d sound like wind passing through sheets left out on a line to dry on a sunny summer day.)

Other human actors looking totally lost include Joel McHale as an FBI guy. (I couldn’t help but notice that McHale’s hairpiece/transplants look less convincing than the hair on the puppet heads.) Maya Rudolph fares a little better as Philip’s human secretary, but Leslie David Baker appears to be in serious pain delivering his typical police-chief lines. Elizabeth Banks gets the worst gig as Jenny, the only human member of the Happytime Gang, who is forced to make out with Philip.

I am very much up for some nastily funny puppet activity. I think Team America: World Police is one of the 21st century’s funniest movies, and The Happytime Murders had good people involved. Alas, a mundane McCarthy and babbling felt heads lead to what will stand as one of the year’s lousiest movies.

I’d say nothing that nothing good could come out of The Happytime Murders, but maybe its failure will create a hankering for the return of Kermit and friends. Regardless, something tells me if McCarthy gets a script for a new Muppet movie by courier in the future, she’s going to kick that courier in the nether region.

The Happytime Murders is playing at theaters across the valley.

Published in Reviews